Killboy failure Dragon Fest

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by SCQTT, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Sweet Jebus. Are you better at braking with four fingers or two? It matters more what the rider is good at and comfortable with than how many fucking fingers they use! :baldy

    There are a shit ton of motorcycles out there, that even with factory spec/service brakes, you still need four fingers on the lever to get maximum braking from.
  2. tedder

    tedder irregular

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    Right. New riders, so teaching a preferred technique that works on all bikes is better than teaching advanced skills.

    Generally speaking it's much easier to "feel" the brakes with four fingers, even if it only takes one. I'm baffled why people are obsessed with finding the minimum number of fingers necessary on their bike.
  3. RxZ

    RxZ Legal Drug Dealer

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    :nod

    I recently replaced the pads, fluid, and lines of the braking system on my ex500. Still have to squeeze HARD with all fingers for max braking. In normal riding I can get by and get stopped with two fingers. In town, I use all four, just in case.
  4. livo

    livo Been here awhile

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    I'm in love :raabia

  5. crofrog

    crofrog Long timer

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    Try finding a pad with a higher initial torque, increasing your rotor diameter or look at changing to a master cylinder with a different bore size.
  6. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Been here awhile

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    Having recently been taught "correct braking technique" after 30 years of riding one thing popped up to surprise me.

    Using only two fingers on the brake can create a situation where the throttle is still open a bit so your braking against the engine. Not good for N00bs. Proper lever adjustment & a closing fist technique allows full braking control or full throttle control but not both.
    Oh, here's the bus. I'm off.
  7. tedder

    tedder irregular

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    We have a large supply of bores here.
  8. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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    New pads is easy.

    Larger rotors? Well, now we're making adapter brackets for the calipers, but OK.

    Larger bore master cylinder will get you less lever travel (so you don't have to pinch your fingers) at the expense of power (force multiplication)l- so you have to use all your fingers to get maximum braking.

    Smaller bore master cylinder gives you more power at the expense of pinching any fingers left on the bar.

    What was the goal again?
  9. Contevita

    Contevita Cigar Adventurer

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  10. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    All that and more. The cheaper bikes usually came with single pot calipers. I upgraded the KLR with a 300 mm rotor, four pot caliper, and new master cylinder. I refuse to own a bike with inferior brakes. Except for the Triumph, which is a correctly restored vintage machine, and it is ridden at events only.
  11. GSequoia

    GSequoia Where are my tools?

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    That's rather personal, don't you think?
  12. LittleRedToyota

    LittleRedToyota Yinzer

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    it's not about finding the minimum necessary.

    using 1 or 2 fingers allows you to maintain better control over the handle bars and throttle at the same time you are braking. you can use all 3 controls (plus the clutch on the other side) with fine input at the same time.

    also, covering the brake with all the fingers you use to apply it allows you to apply it more quickly (as the fingers are already in place instead of having to reach for the lever). and covering the front brake level with 4 fingers all the time would sacrifice bar and throttle control.
  13. dbuzz

    dbuzz Citizen of the world

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    Because that is what all the 'cool' riders do because they saw someone they thought was 'cool' doing it. Then they have to justify it ... hence the hair splitting and finger counting. :roflIt's kind of like how one peice leathers automatically mean you are a great rider :D

    Monkey see, monkey do.
  14. ray h

    ray h Been here awhile

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    No problem, I'm just messing with you.
    I took all kinds of guff from a couple of inmates for riding with my highbeam on so I'm just spreading it around.
  15. Kingsized

    Kingsized Kingsized Adventurer

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    It's all good. I never got my farkles in a tuff, ha!
  16. crofrog

    crofrog Long timer

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    Not to mention the first time your braking and the front starts to tuck with all four fingers on the brake is going to be awesome, as you try to reduce pressure on the brakes while pushing the bars back straight and and scaring the shit out of yourself...
  17. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

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    Give some people credit for espousing the method that works best for them, vice drinking the coolaid and parroting what others do. I am a 1 or 2 finger braker, and a 2 finger clutch person... dirt or pavement. That works for me, it works better than 4 fingers. If 4 fingers worked better, I would espouse that as the method that works for me. Please don't paint with so broad a brush.

    Barry
  18. Orygunner

    Orygunner Adventurer

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    If a new rider is braking, why do they need to use the throttle? As an experienced rider, I sometimes brake with two fingers and blip the throttle when downshifting to match engine RPM to road speed, but that's the only time that the throttle isn't rolled completely off when using the front brake.

    Remember, this conversation started because someone that took the MSF basic rider course was told to use all fingers on their brake and they wanted to know why. It's simply because not covering the brake on the range, and using all four fingers when braking is the best practice for new riders, both for proper consistent technique and safety, for all.

    If you (or anyone else) as an experienced rider, based on your experience and frequent practice with stopping quickly on your bike find that you can do so as safely and quickly with 2 fingers as you can with 4, that your other fingers don't get pinched or limit your brake application, then do it that way. :thumb

    I haven't seen any riders, even new ones, sacrifice bar & throttle control from using all four fingers on their brake (or covering the clutch at all times), on the range or the street. What little off road riding I've seen I can CERTAINLY see the reason on rough terrain, but we're talking smooth pavement here where the bike's not bucking & bouncing.

    ...Orygunner...
  19. Orygunner

    Orygunner Adventurer

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    Are you talking about locking and skidding the front wheel? That's the only reason the bars are going to turn anywhere but in the direction of travel.

    The proper technique when that happens is to quickly RELEASE the front brake and smoothly reapply. You can't "push the bars back straight" to maintain balance while the front wheel is skidding, simply releasing the brake will straighten the bars no matter what else you try and do.

    I've seen some pretty gnarly front wheel skids on the range, and releasing immediately is the only solution. Every single person that released the front brake (before the bike was down, of course) regained control of the bike, even when they had been using all four fingers on the brake.

    ...Orygunner...
  20. HooliKen

    HooliKen Awesome is a flavor

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    :dhorse


    :dhorse

    :pope


    Wear r d pikchures?

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