Kiwi Dreams - Europe & Morocco 2014

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by young1, Apr 17, 2014.

  1. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    Nice, only a Baldrick (Black Adder) fan would have picked that up :-)
    #41
  2. iny46

    iny46 Adventurer

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    Welcome in Europe Mike :clap
    you know there are a bed and some beer for you in the near of Munich
    #42
  3. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    The "plat du jour" or daily special is often a very good deal in cafe's or bistros. One of the things I enjoy about France is participating in what I call "courtesy rituals." For example, in a shop or a petro station/mini mart you may see a tray or small plate on the counter. If, so, place your money on the tray instead of handing it to the cashier directly. They will take up your money, and put the change on the tray for you to take. In large supermarkets, however, I have found that a direct hand to hand transfer is the norm. Expect to be greeted in any shop or store you enter, so get into a regular habit of saying "Bonjour" to just about every one you meet! Even if you lack confidence in French, I recommend trying to use it as I have found that people appreciate any well-meaning attempt I make to speak their language, and that once I have shown my respect thus, they will often switch to English to make things easier. Just my 2 pence based on my experience. Have a wonderful trip! I'll be following in spirit!
    #43
  4. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    I know a smattering of French and have been saying bonjour, merci beaucoup, tre bien, Bon nui (all possibly spelt wrong here but you get the idea).

    Where I am staying tonight the woman knows a wee bit more English than I do French. At times I feel like I am in an episode of Allo Allo, but with lots of charade moves etc. but we get there. It is part of the excitement and learning with travel.

    After many kilometres in motorways today it was a delight to ride the little lanes between here and Ypres tonight.

    Thank you Blader

    Kiwi Mike
    #44
  5. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    Thanks Andreas, would be great to catch up and as I get closer to Germany in, wow, almost 3 months time I will try and head your way. I will build up a thirst just in case :-)

    Mike
    #45
  6. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    And he's rolling! :D

    All the best for your travels mate. I look forward to following your progress so keep the updates coming :deal

    Cheers
    Clint
    #46
  7. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    Whoo Hoo, Take care mate, not as easy on the other side of the road is it. Even walking across the road can be tricky. :eek1
    #47
  8. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    You are telling me, on the little lanes around here I keep saying keep right, it just seems so unnatural.
    #48
  9. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    After lunch yesterday there were a couple of bucket list places I wanted to go. On the way out of Calais I thought it quite apt to see a wild poppy growing so close to Flanders.

    [​IMG]

    Next stop Dunkirk where I stood by the memorial, to take this photo

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    It was very windy yesterday afternoon, not too nice. However I arrived in Bailloul, delightful little town near border with Belgium. This is the bnb I am in, sure beats a modern hotel!

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    Then I headed to Ypres for the 8pm Menin Gate ceremony, quite moving seeing the thousands of names on the memorial. This is people leaving at the end.

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    And finally the delightful roads to ride on between here and Belgium.

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    To Le Havre today with a few detours on the way.

    Kiwi Mike
    #49
  10. Te Hopo

    Te Hopo AKA Deanohit

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    Damn that last shot looks like such a nice road to ride. :D
    #50
  11. Olirider

    Olirider Been here awhile

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    Hello,

    Welcome to France !
    That's funny : As soon as arrived, you managed to find an endangered species : the French Communist Party (PCF). :D
    It's true that northern France used to be its natural settlement...
    #51
  12. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    Up to lunchtime great riding through small villages, bush areas etc. At lunchtime the rain set in so I changed the GPS setting to fastest route and spent time on the motorway.

    I did learn some valuable lessons;
    Sitting on a bike seat in France with a wet ass feels the same as in NZ.
    3 hours in the rain is a good test of waterproofing
    Not all of my jacket pockets are waterproof
    Wet / soggy toll "tickets" from the toll booth can not be read by the automatic reader at the motorway exit
    It is hard to hear a Frenchman through the intercom try and speak English with a helmet and air plugs in.
    The fuel light will come on just as you pass an exit for fuel
    While paging through the GPS options to find closest fuel, you will miss the turning for the next one!
    French women are very understanding when it comes to having wet riding gear hanging around the house

    Any way to the photos

    I went past quite a few war cemeteries today, this was at Caestre

    [​IMG]

    Morning coffee and toilet stop (across the road where that chap is heading). Like NZ people are far friendlier in small bars, horse gambling type places. I "chatted" to the locals while I had my coffee.

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    My first toll booth, about to experience the wet toll booth ticket problem...

    [​IMG]
    #52
  13. Night Falcon

    Night Falcon Tiger Tamer

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    Subscribed have a safe and fantastic adventure you guys. Loving the pics already :clap
    #53
  14. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    A separate post for these photos. In 1942 my dad, a Lieutenant in the British Parachute Regiment, took part in a raid on occupied France. The object was to attack a German radar station and steal key parts for the English scientists to examine.

    While planning my route to pick Leanne up in Portugal I thought it would be nice to go to the French town, Bruneval, where the raid took place. I found out then that there is a memorial to Operation Biting.

    The view walking to the memorial

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    Here is a poppy that one of our family wore to the New Zealand ANZAC day celebration on 25.4.14, placed alongside my dad's name (the last name)

    [​IMG]
    #54
  15. Olirider

    Olirider Been here awhile

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    #55
  16. Padmei

    Padmei enamoured

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    Hey Mike good to hear you're travelling. Looking forward to your updates esp Morocco. If Phil can't make it as your emg mechanic there I'm sure I can fill in.

    What are you taking your pictures with? Sorry to be critical but with such an awesome trip coming up you should really get a good camera - your warehouse phone isn't doing it justice:deal

    Ride safe bro
    #56
  17. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the offer Padmei, I will keep it in mind :-)

    I have sent you a PM re the camera (are my settings wrong...)
    #57
  18. ErikMotoMan

    ErikMotoMan Long timer

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    Big dude, pink helmet ? Scary! When in Southern Spain look up my friends Hana and Patrick of http://www.motoadventours.com. They'll tell you everything you need to know about Morocco.
    #58
  19. young1

    young1 Been here awhile

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    Thank you Erik, I was in touch with Hana early on and she is a LinkedIn contact. We are staying with a tent space inmate in Lisbon, by chance he also takes tours to Morocco so we have had, and will get more, advice from him.

    And yes that helmet was scary, maybe he was colour blind and his mates were playing tricks!

    Thanks again
    Kiwi Mike
    #59
  20. ErikMotoMan

    ErikMotoMan Long timer

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    The company founded in 1963 by McLaren is best known as a Formula One constructor but has also competed and won in the Indianapolis 500 and Canadian-American Challenge Cup (Can-Am). The team is the second oldest active team (after Ferrari) and one of the most successful teams in Formula One, having won 182 races, 12 drivers' championships and 8 constructors' championships.

    The team won its first Grand Prix at the 1968 Belgian Grand Prix but their greatest initial success was in Can-Am, where they dominated from 1967 to 1971. Further American triumph followed, with Indianapolis 500 wins in McLaren cars for Mark Donohue in 1972 and Johnny Rutherford in 1974 and 1976.

    Bruce McLaren died (aged 32) when his Can-Am car crashed on the Lavant Straight just before Woodcote corner at Goodwood Circuit in England on 2 June 1970. He had been testing his new M8D when the rear bodywork came adrift at speed. The loss of aerodynamic downforce destabilized the car, which spun, left the track and hit a bunker used as a flag station.

    Motorsport author Eoin Young has noted that Bruce McLaren had "virtually penned his own epitaph" in his 1964 book From the Cockpit.

    Referring to the death of team mate Timmy Mayer, McLaren had written:

    The news that he had died instantly was a terrible shock to all of us, but who is to say that he had not seen more, done more and learned more in his few years than many people do in a lifetime? To do something well is so worthwhile that to die trying to do it better cannot be foolhardy. It would be a waste of life to do nothing with one's ability, for I feel that life is measured in achievement, not in years alone.

    After Bruce McLaren died, Tim Mayer's brother, Teddy Mayer took over and led the team to their first Formula One constructors' championship in 1974, with Emerson Fittipaldi and James Hunt winning the drivers' championship in 1974 and 1976 respectively. Anyone who has followed F1 is aware of what a powerhouse Mclaren subsequently became - Sadly, McLaren himself wasn't able to witness the success of his talents and labor.

    Attached Files:

    #60