KLR250 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Bad Company, May 10, 2008.

  1. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    Have a soft spot for the 80s/90s Barbie plastics. Extra points for purple frame.
  2. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    The girlfriend wants to try painting it with the plastic paint, she's saying flat black. I don't know, the color is growing on me. Her bike though.

    All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
  3. beeper

    beeper Badger tickler

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    My 95, for reference. :wink:

    [​IMG]

    The previous owner painted it, were it me I would have left it the factory color but this looks fine as well.
  4. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Thanks, she's seen that picture a few times actually. She wants seat and frame done also, along with trimming an inch or so of foam out of the seat. It's a project for next winter I think.

    How's the windshield done? I was wanting to put a screen on and make some wind deflectors on the handguards for now, at least until it warms up some. Handguards will be easy, it has bark busters on it already.


    Does anyone have any of the gas tank rubber puck things laying around, or know of a cheap source? I need that, a left radiator shroud, and some mirrors. The mirrors broke off at the base and ripped some of the switch housing out, I'll just get some universal clamp on one's I imagine. The shround isn't too important right away, but I'd like to get one eventually. It's there, just cracked and bent out from the missing rubber tank puck.
  5. dfye55

    dfye55 Been here awhile

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    The KLR250 supplement manual shows 4 snap rings that hold the rear suspension links in. I don't see snap rings, appears to just be a washer, no split and no snap ring plier holes. Anyone run into this before? Do I just pry these washers off?

    Thanks
  6. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    There are snap rings over the washers holding the suspension in place. They can be a little hard to see at first, especially if the components are dirty. Otherwise it's a bit difficult to get the washers off.
  7. redneckdan

    redneckdan Hold my beer & watch this

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    Yup, little wire 'C-rings' versus what we would normally think of a snap ring which has the two little holes to use pliers for removal. Find the notch in the C-ring then use a pair of small blade screw drivers or dental picks to pry the ends out of the groove.


    Pay attention to how the dog bones come off, they are asymetrical; unlike the 650 which can be swapped side to side or upside down.


    My wifes bike is a barbie colored '95. She wants to paint it as well, she is think a desert tan color. Maybe next winter we will get around to doing a total tear down.

    When you get a chance, tear down the forks or at least change the fluid. Found some nasty stuff in there when I did mine last month.
  8. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    Highly recommend this. It's easier than you'd think to do and can make the bike feel much better.
  9. beeper

    beeper Badger tickler

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    The windshield is an aftermarket tall screen from a KLR 650 that I cut a few inches off the bottom and simply drilled and bolted it to the stock flyscreen. It works great at keeping the windblast off my chest and there is zero buffeting at highway speeds( btw I'm 6'4", results may vary), I'm pleased at how it worked out.
    The wind defectors I cut from an old plastic truck bedliner.

    [​IMG]
  10. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    I gave you an ADV salute as I flew over G-ville at 3000' this afternoon. What's up with these friggin' clouds?:D
  11. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Thanks beeper. I take it the stock front piece is stiff enough to support a small screen then. The one I make her will probably be smaller, as she's only 5'4". She doesn't really care right now if I make one or not, and might not even like it after I make it. She's never had one before.

    She's pretty bummed out over the weather right now. Yesterday was cold. Today it should hit 45, she has to work all day. Turning cold again tomorrow.

    Todays plan is just an oil change and a bit longer test ride, I want to be sure about everything working right. It seems to bog a bit with a quick throttle opening, but I think that will clear up if I let it warm up more. It was 20 something when I rode it, and I didn't go far. 1/8 th mile at most.

    All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
  12. beeper

    beeper Badger tickler

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    I failed to mention, the top bolts are long enough to just come in contact with the gauges for added support. I placed a piece of duct tape where the bolts contact the gauges and that was sufficient to protect the plastic housing. So yes, the stock flyscreen seems strong enough.
  13. redneckdan

    redneckdan Hold my beer & watch this

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    The momentary off idle bog is a trait of the carburator Kawasaki selected for this bike. Things can be done to reduce or eliminate it (ranging from tweaking the CV to pumper or FI) but they will affect fuel mileage.
  14. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Good to know, thanks. I think I'll just turn the air screw out a touch to see what that does then call it good. It runs fine otherwise, no sense opening a can of worms with jetting.

    All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
  15. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    Although Kawasaki may use another nomenclature, the screw-in-question is commonly called a fuel screw, given its location on the engine side of the carb. Idle mixture screws on the air intake side of carburetors are called air screws.

    Backing out the fuel screw, as you suggest, fuel-enriches the idle mixture. 1-3/4 turns out (from a soft bottoming) should be a good starting point, IMHO.

    While I don't think the "22-cent mod," drilling out the slide vacuum port to 7/64" diameter and shimmng the needle with a # 4 washer, of great significance on the KLR250's CVK34 carburetor, might improve throttle response some.

    Yet, as redneckdan posts above, CV carburetors have an inherent lag in slide opening, after the throttle is opened.
  16. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    I know about the cv carb lag, this is more than that. If its below 2000 rpm or so and you twist it to half throttle or more it looses all power. You basically have to roll on the throttle at first. Over 2500ish all is well.

    All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
  17. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    Blocked pilot jet? Vacuum leak?
  18. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    A possibility; diaphragm may be punctured or torn; improperly sealed . . .

    The needle and the needle jet dominate the mixture at throttle opening; might check them out, maybe a # 4 washer shim might help.
  19. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    And here's the 'can of worms' I was hoping to not get into. Oh well.


    For today there's not much to do, the bike shop is closed and hardware store hours are tight on Sundays. No sense tearing apart for a shim then finding out I need something at the bike shop. Still haven't done an oil change yet either, so the bike pretty much needs everything. It's cold and windy right now but she wants to go for a ride up the street. Fluids are there, valves are correct. Should be no harm done, doubt she'll put 1/2 mile on it in this weather.

    Here's the dumb question time. I apologize before hand. I've always bought new(er) bikes, and worked on junk cars. I never saw a reason to buy a nice car, that's good bike money. So basically I am perfectly comfortable doing pretty much everything to a car, but bike knowledge is limited. Learning as I go.

    Carb- plan is to have a shim on hand upon teardown. Clean everything, shim the needle, check the condition of all rubber hoses, put back together. Worth noting that the muffler had some sort of mod done, the spark arrester is gone and the hole on the end seems bigger than it should. No idea what stock looks like, I'm guessing someone just unbolted the tip and threw it away. Sounds OK, but may have leaned out the mixture some.

    Oil- Not to start an oil post, but I always run 5W40 Rotella synthetic in everything else. I haven't seen a reason not to run it in this, but I'm listening.

    Forks- This will be my first time. If all goes well I have an XRR and my KLR650 that should have been done long ago. I'm hoping disassembly won't turn into a project. On the oil level height, I never quite understood how to measure that. I once changed springs on a TTR125, and if I remember right I have no idea how I could have measured the fluid height. Am I missing some easy step here, or is it more involved than I think?

    Coolant- I'll drain and re-fill. Nothing crazy should need done here I imagine. What type of coolant do you guys run? I've never had a bike old enough to consider changing the coolant. Probably should have on a few that were pushing 8 or 10 years old. I learned from my dad, who is a harley guy. He never saw a reason to change that stuff, and I went with it.
  20. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    Carb/Exhaust- Sounds like you've got this covered

    Oil- Dance with who brung ya

    Forks- Two routes: just replace the oil or full disassembly and replace the oil. Either way you'll need fork oil and new seals, and is fairly straight-forward:

    Replace Oil
    1. Remove front wheel, brake caliper, speedo sensor and cable
    2. Loosen top fork cap (easiest while front wheel is still attached), leave finger tight
    3. Loosen triple trees and remove forks
    4. Remove fork caps, take out spring, spacer, fork spring guide
    5. Turn upside down and drain (get as much out as possible)
    6. Replace fork cap and tighten
    7. Remove seal snap ring
    8. Wear safety goggles and wrap fork seals with a rag
    9. Slowly pressurize the fork using the fitting on the fork cap. Sometimes it takes 20-30psi, sometimes 100. Suggest do it in 10 psi jumps, letting it sit at each new pressure
    10. Seals will pop. Work them out with picks, small screwdrivers, etc
    11. Clean seal surfaces
    12. Place new seals, a suitable section of PVC should work great as a driver
    13. Clean internal components, refill with suitable oil. Generally 430mL will get you to 170mm from the top of the tube (measured vertically).

    Disassembly- Same as above until #5
    1. Remove front wheel, brake caliper, speedo sensor and cable
    2. Loosen top fork cap (easiest while front wheel is still attached), leave finger tight
    3. Loosen triple trees and remove forks
    4. Remove fork caps, take out spring, spacer, fork spring guide
    5. Turn upside down and drain (get as much out as possible)
    6. Place a Craftsman 13/16" spark plug wrench backwardson a 24" socket extension (see below pic) and put this down the fork tube and on the fork damper rod
      [​IMG]
    7. Place a 6mm allen on the bottom bolt (you will either need long arms or two people) and take that bolt out
    8. Remove fork seal snap ring
    9. At this point the only thing holding the fork together are the fork seals; hold the bottom fork with one hand and "slam" the top fork out with the other. Think of it like a bearing puller.
    10. Remove the internal dampener rod components and clean. This stuff will be icky like the fork oil, recommend a big bucket
    11. You should be able to get it from here

    Coolant- Whatever's cheapest.

    Hope that helps!