KLR250 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Bad Company, May 10, 2008.

  1. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Awesome, thanks a lot. Seems easy enough, just take my time with it. I need to get a measuring cup thing also, I don't have anything suitable to measure 430ml.

    All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
  2. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    Thanks! Regarding the 170mm measurement from the oil to the top "vertically", is that dead nuts vertical or as measured with the forks in the triples on an angle? I supposed one cannot hold the front end of bike up with the caps off.

    A clever person could drain and fill one at a time thus keeping the front end up. I know I'm splitting hairs on this. I need to be prepared to rebuild the forks at home in CT when I return from my Sonny's BBQ weekend.:dg
  3. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    Isn't "night and day," but . . . shimming the needle might help. Don't want to drill out the vacuum port to 7/64" diameter while you're at it? Then you'll have a complete, righteous "22-cent mod!" (Full disclosure, my KLR250's CVK34 is stock (fuel screw adjusted); my KLR650 has full 22-cent mod.)
    Only "crazy" thing; be sure to burp your cooling system thoroughly (run with radiator cap off 'til coolant circulates, expelling all air bubbles and pockets; then top off coolant (IMHO, any 50-50 coolant''s o.k.), button her up, and ride!).

    Without burping, an air pocket may frustrate coolant circulation on idle, causing high temperature indication without triggering themal fan switch.
  4. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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  5. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Xdragracer, I can drill out the port while I'm there. I did my 650's and it didn't seem to change much though. Either way, i have the bit and ill be in it that far. Might as well do it.

    I'll make sure to burp the system, thanks.


    It looks like somewhat of a project measuring the oil height. The fluid level is going to be at an angle obviously, and it has to be 170mm down, at the center, with a 2mm leeway? Seems hard to get right.

    All typos and misspellings blamed on my phone.
  6. 3DChief

    3DChief "Moto therapist"

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    It's not complicated to measure at all. Take 2 zip ties and make a "T". The top of the T goes across the end of the fork, the vertical leg of the T hangs down into the fork. Measure the end that dangles down into the fork and cut it at 170mm. With the fork off the bike and vertical, pour in oil until it touches the end of the dangling zip tie. Cycle the fork a few times to make sure all the air is out and re-check the level.

    Tim
  7. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    Thanks for the pic of the fork procedure.
  8. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Cool, thanks.

    newcastledan, thanks for your help also. Hopefully this all goes as easily as planned.
  9. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    I was messing around last night, figured I'd throw this picture up for anyone curious. A Giant Loop Coyote fits the KLR fairly well. The rear hooks just barely fit, I have the strap as long as it can go and had to pull them pretty tight. They are meant to hook on the fender, but I have the left side on this gusset looking part of the frame and the right where the helmet lock used to be. I may notch the fender later to get it to fit better, haven't decided if it's needed or not. The kicker barely works, but does. You need to angle your foot out some and kick with your heel. The lower straps need to be on the passanger peg bracket to angle the bag down. If they are on the frame like I do on my XR then the bag sits more flat and the kicker hits the bag.

    I have the bag stuffed with random clothes, and the sleeping pad on the back was just for me to see how it would hold. If traveling with the girlfriend the bag will be packed with light bulky stuff and I'll carry the heavy stuff on my bike. If I was by myself on this bike there'd be more strapped on, but it should still work fine.

    [​IMG]
  10. enumclaw

    enumclaw I just....don't know

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    Timely. Been thinking the last few days how a Coyote would work on the 250. Thanks.
  11. dfye55

    dfye55 Been here awhile

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    thanks! Wondered about fit and kicker.

    Sent from mobile
  12. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    Here's a few more pictures I just took:

    Kick starter clearance. It's tight but works:

    [​IMG]

    The gusset at the bottom is where the hook is currently:

    [​IMG]

    I think I'm cutting a small notch in the fender to move the hook up to just above the frame:

    [​IMG]

    Bag sits a bit crooked. Notching the fender and moving the hooks up will fix this

    [​IMG]

    Strap is right at the limit. Again, a fender notch will fix:

    [​IMG]
  13. stevemd

    stevemd Adventurer

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    These are made in the USA, FA67R. Seem to get good reviews online. Thanks for any feedback. ('89 KLR250)
  14. enumclaw

    enumclaw I just....don't know

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    That's what I use. They seem to stop the bike. :lol3
  15. Voidrider

    Voidrider Been here awhile

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    I've mentioned my '89 basket case. I am reading and re-reading this thread for info.

    I realize I need the KLR 600 base manual, and the KLR 250 Supplement. I found that the KLR 600 appears to have been in production from '84-'90? I am wondering, would the manual of any particular year be preferable?
  16. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    Not preferable, IMHO, because referrals in the KLR250 supplement are referred to the KLR600 base manual.

    You could probably interpolate some yourself and "get by" with a KLR650 manual, either Kawasaki publication or Clymer's, but . . . wouldn't say the technique "preferable" to a KLR600 manual; YMMV!
  17. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    Finally got my basket case twofiddy running. The 1.0mm over Wiseco piston worked great....until the slighly ganked cam chain tensioner cap screw gave way and started burping oil. Also noticed that the handlebars took some hits, so that's on the list too.
  18. EmkIoway

    EmkIoway Adventurer

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    I have a Klr 600 base manual for sale you can have.
  19. dfye55

    dfye55 Been here awhile

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    Got my bash plate installed, finished setting the valves and got her put back together. Wired in phone, gps, and Trail Tech computer on a switch. So far so good.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Then I pulled the rear suspension links and pins to swap for lowering links and was disappointed to find rusty pin surfaces and rusty pins where the links were in contact with them. :eek1 I tried polishing out with steel wool, but there is very shallow pitting. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    After seeing that the pins rotate on roller bearings, and those surfaces were clean and undamaged, I have come to the conclusion that unless there is a loose fit, the rusted links and pins are not a problem.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Thoughts? :ear<o:p></o:p>
  20. newcastleadam

    newcastleadam Artful Tagger

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    Should be fine. Perhaps apply a film of anti-seize during re-installation?