KLR250 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Bad Company, May 10, 2008.

  1. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Here's my new (to me) '03 KLR 250. Since buying it a few weeks ago I've changed all fluids and filters, replaced the tubes and tires, installed new grips, replaced the chain and sprockets, and had the valves adjusted. Today I installed a gently used front rotor (mine was a little too groovy), and replaced the front pads with EBC Carbon models. I also made the back platform that holds the Pelican pistol case. I made the platform out of 3/8" luan plywood, coated it in marine epoxy, then gave it a couple of coats of Army green epoxy ammo can paint.

    I've probably put about 500-600 miles on the bike so far, and it's given me no trouble whatsoever. Last weekend I took it on a 3 day trail-riding adventure in the Mid-Michigan area. All in all I'm very happy with it so far.
    [​IMG]
  2. Hannda

    Hannda Short, fat, bearded, slow

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    31,610
    Location:
    Not yet far enough away from town
    A gal on the site is considering buying my wife's '04 KLR250. She wants to know if there are any "universal" racks that will fit the KLR250 to hold soft luggage - like DirtBagz or the soft panniers she currently owns. Any suggestions or recommendations? Thanks in advance.
  3. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Since I removed the toolbag from my '03 KLR 250 to make room for a rack to hold a small Pelican case, I decided to relocate the tool bag to the spot just above the front fender. There just happens to be two unused bolt holes there, so I used them to bolt my homemade tool bag bracket to the bike. First step was to make a wooden bottom for the toolbag, out of some 1/4" luan plywood I had lying around. I used the toolbag itself as a template to locate the bolt holes that I used to bolt the bag and wooden bottom to my metal relocation bracket.
    [​IMG]
  4. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Next step was to cut out the material for the bracket itself, out of some heavy-gauge sheet metal:
    [​IMG]
  5. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    I used the wooden bottom to locate the holes on my metal bracket. Next I inserted the wooden bottom into the bag, and put the original toolbag bolts through the holes:
    [​IMG]
  6. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Next I placed my custom metal bracket over the stock bolts, and secured the bracket to the bag with split washers and stainless nuts. When everything was tightened up, it sandwiched the bag between the wooden bottom and the sheet steel bracket:
    [​IMG]
  7. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Next I just bolted the bracket/bag to the lower fork clamp:
    [​IMG]
  8. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

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    Oct 26, 2009
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    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Due to the gauge of the sheetmetal used, the bracket is very sturdy. I think the use of split washers throughout should keep anything from vibrating loose. Now I've got a place to keep my digital camera, pocket knife, etc. while cruising around during the day, and I no longer have to access my locked rear box whenever I need these items. As a final step I cleaned the bag with a product called Vinylex, which left it looking like new. Total cost for this project was $2.65 worth of hardware, and about an hour of my time.
    [​IMG]
  9. ECDLTF

    ECDLTF Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    49
    That was a good idea to relocate the tool bag. How long do you think the material in the tool bag will last? My tool bag is in pretty good shape on my 2000 KLR. What kind of grips did you put on? Do you still have the stock handlebars? What kind of tires to you install? Thanks.


  10. HandKPhil

    HandKPhil Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    Oddometer:
    579
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan

    The tool bag itself seems to be in good shape. Should last at least a few more years, I would think. The plywood I used for the bottom is a high-grade mahogany that's about 1/4" thick. I've actually used it as the skin on a couple of boats I built.

    The grips are called ProGrips, I believe. I just found them hanging on the wall at my local dealership. They were about $10.00, and they're very comfortable and highly grippy. The handlebars that are on my bike are stock, as far as I know? The tires are brand-new Shinko 700 Trail Masters. I think they're pretty good all around 60/40 tires.
  11. Quick5pnt0

    Quick5pnt0 Adventurer

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    Aug 27, 2009
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    Location:
    PA
    Nice work!
  12. Harris1200

    Harris1200 Been here awhile

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    Sep 14, 2009
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    313
    Location:
    Sydney, Sutherland Shire
    Hey guys, sorry if this has been covered but what kind of performance can i expect from a 92 klr250. I picked this little baby up from ebay for next to nothing for my little brother to learn to ride on. He loves it! It doesn't seem to have much power up top but, it really struggles to sit on 100 km/h down the freeway. Is this normal or should i start playing around with it.

    Thanks any thoughts would be great

    Chris
  13. Hannda

    Hannda Short, fat, bearded, slow

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    31,610
    Location:
    Not yet far enough away from town
    Unless your brother weighs in at 200 kilos it should cruise nicely at 100 km/h (62 mph). Should cruise nicely at 65 mph or maybe a little better if you're at a low altitude. 70 mph would be a push and 75 is probably top speed to be used only for short stretches, like for passing - at least at the altitude I live at. At sea level it may be able to cruise at an indicated 70mph (I'm sure others here will chime in with better, local, information). It may just need a tune up.
  14. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    170
    Location:
    S.E. Pa

    I don't weigh in at 200 kilos but close to 3/4 of that with camping gear and the lil' beast will pull at 100kmh on the highway no problem. At first I thought RPM's were high and was a little afraid - but 2 years and 7500+ miles later 110 kmh is easy and 120 for short stretches.

    Just keep an eye on valve adjustments
  15. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,818
    Nice work, HandKPhil!

    Here's an image of a similar commercial product installed:

    [​IMG]

    This firm also manufactured a plastic "dock," for the space atop the rear fender where the tool bag originally perched.

    [​IMG]

    Apparently, the demand for KLR250 aftermarket products isn't particularly great; my last try accessing the vendor's website bounced, although an archived version was available.
  16. Harris1200

    Harris1200 Been here awhile

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    Sep 14, 2009
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    313
    Location:
    Sydney, Sutherland Shire
    Thanks for the reply guys. I thought it should go a bit better. Ill do all the tune up stuff and pull the carby apart and see whats going on... i have a feeling someone has played with it and now it running mega rich.

    Cheers
    Chris
  17. ECDLTF

    ECDLTF Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    49
    Is that vendor still selling KLR250 parts or is he out of business? By the way, you have a nicely accessorized KLR. What kind and size of tires are you running? What other accessories did you add to your KLR? How do you like the rear rack? Thanks.

  18. Quick5pnt0

    Quick5pnt0 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    54
    Location:
    PA
    At the very least you'll probably want to clean the carb, adjust the valves and throw a new plug in it. I can definitely see the possibility of the carb jets being gunked up and basically starving the motor of fuel at higher rpms.
  19. ChiliRTF

    ChiliRTF Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Somerville MA
    Selling my KLR250, located in Pepperell, MA (on the MA/NH border).

    I've posted in Flea Market, but given the rate at which new listings start, things get buried pretty quickly.

    Link to the listing here.

    Has a leaky fork seal which will be fixed this weekend. It's just sitting in the garage and wants to be ridden, make me an offer.

    Thanks!
  20. McHaven

    McHaven Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    Rusk, TX
    May be picking up a 94 KLR250 for the girlfriend today. Seems like it would be a great starter bike for her. She'll just have to get used to that terrible color scheme. Its the Barbie years colors. It isn't running, but it was listed for 250 bucks! Dad's on his way to check out. I wonder what mysteries lay
    ahead

    edit: Got word back from my dad, who went out to say the bike. The photo in the ad was like 3 years old and the bike looked like it had been sitting in the bay for 2 years. Rusty, engine seized, etc etc. DAMN.