KLR250 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Bad Company, May 10, 2008.

  1. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    You're not confusing foot lbs for inch pounds are you? I would not even bother with a torque wrench. The cover should go on easy. If you have to wrestle with it something's not right. Then just go around and snug all the bolts wrist tight and that should be enough.
  2. HBL

    HBL Adventurer

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    Thanks. Actually, wrist tight is exactly what I did. The factory torque specs always feel a bit much to me on this older bike.

    The cover went on easily and seemed to set perfectly flat against the case. I was completely baffled when it cracked.

    The only thing I didn't pay close attention to was how the clutch mechanism engaged inside. I'll pay more attention with the second attempt but am wondering if there is anything in particular I need to look for. Is alignment not required, does it align itself, or do I need to make sure it is in some specific position when I slide the cover on?

    Thanks again. I appreciate the suggestions. This just seemed like an easy fix...


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  3. KLR250NC

    KLR250NC Adventurer

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    I have another questions for the experts. I was using a half ass wheel chock on the trailer I was using to transport the 'new' KLR to be inspected. Hit a bump, tire slid over and it fell on the right side. Dented the radiator and the fan shroud. I cranked it and let it run for about 10 minutes but the fan never came on. The previous owner said that the fan didn't come on until 3/4 of the way on the temp gauge. I have bent the shroud off the fan to where it is not touching but the fan is still hard to turn by hand.

    Question 1- Should the fan turn freely by hand or should it not? It feels like it has a bump in it every rotation, but it is not touching anywhere.

    The radiator did not leak fluid when it was running but I had the bike upright. I will post some pictures when I get home but it probably depressed the right side radiator approx 1/2"-1" on the side.

    Question 2- Should I try to EASILY bend the radiator side bracket back out so the engine shroud will fit back or just order another right side radiator. I found some on ebay fairly decent priced compared to new.

    Is there anything else I should check or should be worried about? Rookie move, I know.
  4. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    My fan turns easily. Maybe you could pull the fan off the shaft and check the shaft for straightness. The other stuff may or may not matter. I would be cautious about bending stuff as you might break it.
  5. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    You can check your fan circuitry (up to the thermal switch) by grounding the lead to the thermal switch. The fan should activate when the lead contacts electrically frame ground.

    If the fan does not turn under this test condition, the fan relay or the fan motor itself could be malfunctioning. You can test the motor in isolation by applying + 12 VDC to the fan's blue wire.

    The thermal switch, at the bottom of the radiator, grounds the lead at a temperature around 200 degrees F. to activate the fan relay and the fan. You can boil it on the stove if necessary to test.

    This link takes you the BigCee's fan circuit wiring diagram for the KLR650 (Generation 1); same as the KLR250's except: No fan fuse on the 250, IIRC:

    http://www.bigcee.com/faq/KLR-Fan-ckt-4.jpg

    Back to the question at the top of this post: If you drain and refill your radiator in your "treatment," be sure to burp the radiator fully; the KLR250 is very sensitive to air pockets in the coolant plumbing.
  6. rube

    rube Been here awhile

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    I have a cycleracks rack on my klr250. It is a Great rack for my commute. I have a 10 gallon tough tote on it, which I find incredibly handy.
    Since I first got the rack I have had trouble withe the rear mounting tabs. They just do not line up well with the threaded holes on the underside of the seat rail that they are suppose to bolt into. I was able to get the 8 mm bolts threaded, but it seems that every time I do a little dirt riding that the right rear mount bolt shakes loose. The it is always very difficult to get the replacement bolt lines up again. I lost the bolt again today and am looking for a better way to attach the rear mount to the bike. I want it to be easier to attach, and less likely to come apart.
    My idea is to drill a hole all the way through the seat rail so I can use a through bolt and lock nut, rather than fighting to get the bolt started in the threaded stock mounting bolt. I was going to drill the hole slightly undersized and use a 6 mm bolt and lock nut.
    Anyone tried this before, or any other ideas about a better way to attach the cycleracks rack to the klr250?

    Thanks
    rube
  7. dfye55

    dfye55 Been here awhile

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    Another awesome ride thanks to my 05 klr250! Rode stoney lonesome dualsport this weekend. All the other bikes I saw were dirt bikes with lights added, ive got OEM signals and the cycle racks. It kept up with other bikes ok, handled the tight woods and technical sections great. I stayed away from "black" and difficult sections, cause I'm just an occasional rider. Ill try to wade thru the hours of video to post some highlights. The bike is awesome, increased the damping and preload made a difference from last years soft ride, but better.

    Sent from mobile
  8. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    I bought a set of progressive 1136 springs for my '98. I'll get them this Thursday, hopefully. Seller says they come with PVC spacers, but no directions. I've been reading online about installation, and I'm a little confused.

    Do you get rid of the stock steel spacers and just put in the progressive plastic ones? You don't use both, I assume. Does the amount of recommended fork oil change, or is it still 190mm from top? Same 10w20, or something different? Is it true I won't need to air them up, or will they still require air?

    Anyone installed these springs? I'm looking forward to some front end improvement. I also have a Galfer stainless brake line and EBC shoes to install. Any advice on what type brake fluid? 4 or 5?
  9. MILLENNIUM FALCON

    MILLENNIUM FALCON Been here awhile

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    Im glad to see this thread is still alive! I went out for a nice Sunday ride on my 95'. It was about 40 miles on the back roads near my house. Lookouts, fields, farms and Mountains. It was Beautiful Then back home for a campfire and some mountain pies and marshmallows with the family. It was a great summer day. Sorry To picture bomb this thread, but I didn't think anyone would mind. [​IMG]
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  10. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    Picture-bomb away! Looks like you had a great day!
    Beautiful family. The dog looks like he has his priorities.

    Is a mountain pie another name for a grilled cheese sandwich?
  11. MILLENNIUM FALCON

    MILLENNIUM FALCON Been here awhile

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    Thank you...haha. Yeah the dog knows who to sit by. The Mt pie in our area can have anything inside it. These were pizza filling. We make cheese steak,Ruben,ham and cheese. And dessert fillings. Pretty much anything you want. They are bake inside a cast iron pie iron. They are my primary source of food while camping. They also make mean egg mcmuffins
  12. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    Great pics. Where? My guess is PA.
  13. MILLENNIUM FALCON

    MILLENNIUM FALCON Been here awhile

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    Yup central pa
  14. MotoJ

    MotoJ Mobtown Hacker

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    Any pointers?
  15. lwood10

    lwood10 Adventurer

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  16. Powderaddict

    Powderaddict Been here awhile

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    Ugh, still having issues overheating. Like where the coolant boils over and runs out the overflow line.

    I've done the following:

    - Burped the coolant tank several times
    - Replaced the Radiator cap twice
    - Checked the oil for coolant (oil came out clean)
    - Wired the fan to a toggle switch, fan runs all the time (helped a bit)

    So as long as I'm moving at a good clip, the bike is fine. But when stopped, the temperature climbs drastically. Like it will go from normal to way into the red at a stop light. When stopped, if I rev it up, it pushes the coolant through and drops the temp, which the fan toggle switch has helped with.

    A couple things:
    - This bike has a 330 kit in it. Awesome, I love it. I can keep up at 75 all day long. The previous owner stated it had heating issues, but he drilled a small hole through the thermostat, and that it took care of the heating issues. Apparently not. He's telling me to drill a second hole of the same size. Does this make sense to anyone? What would this accomplish?
    - I can smell the faint smell of coolant from the right radiator. I can't find any leaks, anywhere. I suspect there may be a small hole or crack somewhere in the radiator. There's no visible signs, just the smell. It's not strong, but strongest right where the fan draws air through the radiator. I am going to replace the right side radiator.

    I want to feel confident my bike will not overheat if I am in stop and go traffic. I'd like to ride to Denver, but don't want to ride in Denver until I get this issue fixed.

    So a couple questions:

    1. Does the hole in the thermostat make sense to anyone? I think I'll replace the thermostat while going through everything. The one that's in there is supposedly pretty new, but who knows. The previous owner was pretty adamant about drilling the hole through the thermostat as solving his overheating issue with the 330cc engine.

    2. Do you know if the radiator from any year will swap in? I have an 89, and have found conflicting info. There's one for a 99 on ebay right now, but their little part guide says it won't fit.

    3. Revving the engine seems to push the coolant through while at a stop where idling doesn't. Might that indicate any other problems?

    4. Any other ideas?

    Thanks!
  17. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    You may just be paying the price of the 330 cc bit-bore hop-up!

    The water pump, etc., were NOT designed to handle the heat load of a 330 cc engine at idle. Rather, a 250 cc engine.

    Drilling a hole in the thermostat sounds like a fool's errand to me; when the thermostat reaches its threshold temperature, IT OPENS FULLY! What good would another (one weep hole exists OEM, IMHO) small hole do, when the thermostat is CLOSED?

    Your problem, I gather, occurs when the coolant is HOT; during these moments, the thermostat is completely OPEN. Don't see another small hole helping anything.

    Think about it: You've INCREASED the possible volume of combustible mixture by unit time by approximately 30 per cent; does it make sense that extra combustion, at idle, without additional air flow or coolant circulation, may not be able to keep up with the heat load?

    Further, I'm not familiar with your 330 kit. Unless extraordinary steps were taken, regarding piston design, cylinder/head/gasket dimensioning, the COMPRESSION RATIO could be increased . . . by how much? Again, 30 per cent. The higher CR suggests possible higher combustion chamber temperatures.

    Heat control/stabilization has been a problem of hop-up eternally; ask someone who raised the compression ratio of his flathead Ford V-8!

    Regrettably, there may be no free lunch; the additional displacement may require heat management compensation by--additional radiator capacity, a more robust water pump, an enhanced cooling fan . . . hey, what about TWO cooling fans?

    As things stand, I'd consider you're ahead of the game--you have increased power, and safe, stable engine temperature operation at speed. Without significant cooling system modifications (never mind the hole in the thermostat), you may have to nurse it through idling intervals, on a hot day.

    That said, still--congratulations on your performance improvement!

    -----------------------------

    I'll try to answer one question:
    No, IMHO. Revving the engine makes the water pump turn faster, circulating a greater volume of water per unit time, available to cool the engine, again, IMHO.
  18. kidflyr

    kidflyr Adventurer

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    1. drilling a hole in the thermostat will allow more coolant past the T-stat before the engine is up to the thermostat's rated temperature. This means that the bike will take a slight amount longer to warm up from a cold start, and may take a few seconds longer to heat up at idle after traveling at speed. If the PO was using the bike on trails, with sustained rpms or on roads with few stops, I imagine he could become convinced of "Problem solved!" after drilling a little hole.

    2. Radiator from any year should swap in. Different colored plastics and the wimpier, NOx-emmision friendlier cams of later model-years are the most major changes the bike got over the years from Kawasaki.

    3. See XDragRacer's post.

    4. Run a more watery mix in the radiator: if you're running 50/50 water/antifreeze, try 80%water/20% antifreeze, or just distilled water and a corrosion inhibitor.

    Consider a coolant additive, such as water wetter. The main selling point of such additives is that they lower coolant temperatures.

    Remove or chop the fender, or run a smaller one like the acerbis supermoto fender (I mounted one, it made crosswinds much less of an issue also) or UFO superbike low mount fender. Any of these will allow more air to the radiator, though mainly at speed.

    Patman mod. Again, this one helps mainly at speed, seems to help the fan exhaust stay separated from the air flowing into the radiator at a stop too.

    Higher pressure radiator cap. I wouldn't try this until you're confident of your radiator's structural integrity, and I'd get new hoses on there for peace of mind. This will increase the boiling point of whatever coolant you use, keeping it as a liquid and in the radiator doing it's duty up to a higher temperature.

    Lower temperature thermostat: it will open sooner, allowing coolant to flow through the radiator beginning at a lower temperature, slowing the onset of the problem. Not perfect, but more elegant than drilling a hole in the thermostat.

    Run without a thermostat: I would consider this a last resort because it would subject the cylinder and head to rapid temperature swings and likely run too cool on the highway, but it would allow maximum flow that the coolant pump can offer by removing any obstruction from the thermostat or its "frame". You'd need to replace the thermostat with an O-ring like watt-man does with his Thermo-Bob kit.

    watt-man has done some thorough testing on the 650 in the realm of the cooling system, and much of it is transferable to our KLR250's:
    http://watt-man.com/uploads/Margin.pdf

    Send an e-mail or make a phone call to Greg at Cycle Works Racing in PA. His shop is the only one I'm aware of that offers a 330cc kit. http://cycleworksracing.net/
  19. ChromeSux

    ChromeSux Un-plated and Unscrewed

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    Have you checked the hose routing, one time i worked on my KLR250 hooked the coolant hoses up backwards at the motor, dont laugh, it was easy to do, i had the same type problem, as long as i was going along at a good clip things were fine.

    Came home that afternoon and studied the situation and realized what i had done, what made it so easy to mix up the hoses, is they fit just fine backwards.
  20. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    For powderaddict:

    I believe these are correct. It's how the bike came and I have no cooling issues.

    [​IMG]

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