KLR650 Only Thread......

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by willys, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. tjk2134

    tjk2134 Adventurer

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    I have over 10,000 miles on my 17 front sprocket, I had to trim the cover but managed to tuck the wires away from the chain and so far so good. It turns about 5000 rpm at 85mph.
  2. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Omnia mea mecum porto

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    Ok, I wasn't supremely confident in what it said, but because I have more of a "photographic" memory of sorts, I was pretty sure there was a diagram of the label in there somewhere. Guess I was not fullly correct (more detail below.) So here's what my owner's manual says. No diagram, just text.
    [​IMG]

    So the only real spec that I wasn't familiar with was the "SE, SF, or SG".
    Looked it up and here's what I found. All are obsolete. :lol3
    [​IMG]

    My KLR Clymer manual says the following:
    [​IMG]
    Again, no diagram.

    Maybe it's my Suzuki Clymer? Nope. Same basic story though.
    [​IMG]

    Lastly, I checked my '03 Honda Shadow Spirit 750 owner's manual. Bingo.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    So, technically, no, my KLR manual doesn't specifically reference the labeling like I thought.

    In my search for further knowledge in limited time this morning, I stumbled into this article by Motorcycle Consumer News which supposedly "debunks" the Auto oil vs. Moto oil debate. :dunno

    I'll try to give it a full read when I have time.
    LINK HERE.

    Also, as to my personal experience, I used Mobil 1 in my bike for MANY miles. Made sense to me because that's what I used in my car too. Well, I can't prove any correlation, but I'm probably one of few individuals on here that have replaced the clutch in my KLR. Take that as one potential data point if you like.
  3. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    Thnx for posting above... some good info. I think the oil in KLRs leads a tough life. Reading this article below convinced me to change my oil out sooner than I had been doing.

    Another interesting automotive vs motorcycle oil article: http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html
  4. redog1

    redog1 KTM 690R

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    in both my 2009 and 1990. I use Castrol GTX 10w40. Tried different viscosities but found 10W40 works best for me and my riding. The only thing I've found with using automotive oil is the clutch tends to grab when started in gear cold. After warm it's a non-issue. My clutch doesn't slip, never has unless I've been riding it in technical terrain. When I start my bike cold in gear, I just tap the start button to "break" the clutch loose. Haven't had any problems, both bikes have 32K on them now and I've had the 2009 since new and the 1990 since approx 18K miles. I'll stick to what works for me. :D
  5. MacNoob

    MacNoob piney fresh

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    Seems to be a KLR issue regardless what oil is used.

    Generally only 'thinner' oil like 5W-30, 10W-30 (stuff we're not using anyways) will have the dreaded friction modifiers. 'Thicker' oils that we use (xW-40, xW-50) never will. Thus they will never say 'energy conserving' in the API donut symbol.
  6. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Bad Influence

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  7. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer

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    Neither does mine (2007 Kawasaki KLR650 Owner's Manual):

    [​IMG]

    So much for Kawasaki's recommendations (no prohibition listed for "friction modifiers" or "energy conserving" in the KLR250 Service Manual supplement, either).

    The Clymer Generation 1 KLR650 manual contains the same italicized caveat regarding additives you imaged above, but I found no specific friction modifier/energy conserving oil-in-the-bottle cautions:

    [​IMG]

    Regardless, thanks for sharing your most interesting research.

    Oils containing "friction modifiers" or formulated with some "energy-conserving" association may indeed be detrimental to wet clutches; just didn't recall any Kawasaki advice to that effect.

    Sorry about your clutch; if it failed as a result of running zinc-laden Mobil 1, this fact's worth a warning to KLR (and other wet-clutch motorcycle) riders.

    Again, appreciate the references.
  8. Tsotsie

    Tsotsie Semi-reformed Tsotsi

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    Now if you have a Kawasaki KLR works manual it tells you specifically to use Moly based grease when assembling several parts of the motor - starter motor idler gear bearings, clutch lifter shaft, etc.

    I have never heard of a documented failure regarding the use of different oil types in KLR's or extended oil change periods. There is a heap of opinion, assumptions, claims, speculation and "..I know a mechanic who told me...", "...an oil rep once told me...", relating to when, how, why not and why. Low oil, yes.

    Choose the right weight oil that KAWA suggest, then the color of the bottle you like or flip a coin. You cant go wrong.
  9. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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  10. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Omnia mea mecum porto

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    Seems interesting that my Honda manual says it when the clutch technology is basically identical.

    Regarding my clutch- I alluded that I couldn't directly attribute the cause. I did use Mobil 1 for many touring miles with medium-duty off-roading. I later switched when my clapped out car dictated cheaper, thicker oil.
  11. Mnrider2

    Mnrider2 Been here awhile

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    Is 5.10-17 and 3.00-21 the right tire size or should I get a 3.25-21 front.
    thanks
  12. Nitro1970

    Nitro1970 Been here awhile

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    I get whichever oil is the cheapest when I get on the oil aisle at Walmart. Rotella T, Delo 400, Castrol GTX... I just change it at 2K miles and ride...


    Either front will work
  13. Mnrider2

    Mnrider2 Been here awhile

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    Yes but I still like the fries from Burger King better than the ones from McDonands :)
  14. Aprilia

    Aprilia Long timer

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    Lots of mis-info regarding viscosity...Here is a post I did over at another KLR forum. Hope that helps explain it better.

    As others stated you should purchase/use the oil as outlined in your owners manual. Different engines (bearings actually) require different viscosity. My Viper requires 0W even in our 115F summer heat.
  15. Nitro1970

    Nitro1970 Been here awhile

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    Yeah the ones they have now are pretty dang good... Years ago McDonald's fries where better than Burger King, Dairy Queen and their daughter Wendy's
  16. Tsotsie

    Tsotsie Semi-reformed Tsotsi

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  17. jules083

    jules083 Long timer

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    I have a big gun exhaust on my 05, it pops a bit. I've gone from too lean (po) to too rich, and might even have been right at some point. I'm not exactly a klr expert, or jetting expert, but I think its the nature of the beast.


    Does anyone else's klr get this weird 'speed wobble' thing on the highway? At around 75 indicated my bike starts getting this lazy wobble back and forth. I played with rear preload and it didn't seem to change anything. I typically stay below 70 anyways, so its not a major issue, but that will probably change next summer when I use the bike more for longer rides. Running kenda big blocks, front at 95% rear at about 60% ish. Both were new 700 miles ago.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2
  18. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Bad Influence

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    NO.

    Many factors can contribute to front end "wobble";

    Possible causes.........
    Low tire pressure
    Unbalanced tire
    Warped brake rotor
    Bad wheel bearings
    Mismatched front and rear tire treads designs
    Bad or mis-adjusted neck bearings
    Uneven weight distribution / front to rear

    or possible other causes. Start simple, like readjust weight, re-balance your tires, check neck bearings and so on........
  19. mxboy96

    mxboy96 Adventurer

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    No offense to anyone out there who spends time studying engine oils or is an actual technician, but don't you think it'd be better to just use what the owners manual tells you to, being the people who actually 'built' the machine probably know what's best for it? Think about it;) The japanese aren't as dumb as they used to be(ex. WWII). Plus it'd save a whole bunch of time for riding than unneeded arguements proving people wrong.
  20. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    Agree to a point. My takeaway from these various oil related articles I've read is that most (pretty well all?) of the name brand oils are pretty decent quality nowadays... and certainly much better than 20+ years ago. This business tho of mineral based oils (automotive or motorcycle) showing significant degradation in as little as 800 miles really surprised me. These scientific studies do seem to confirm that full synthetics degrade much slower, holding up much better under severe use. I would rather know than not know (about the truth in motor oil quality/performance), particularly given the claims of some manufacturers, and the huge price difference between some oils. Check out the price of a new KLR head - sure makes me very reluctant to attempt to save a few pennies extending an oil change interval! I don't think that anyone here is really suggesting deviating away from OEM viscosity recommendations or oil change intervals.