KTM 690 Adventure (re)build

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by mrwwwhite, Oct 12, 2014.

  1. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Cheers S_S, hope to put myself to work soon and start the detailed write up but I was a bit busy with the second stage of my rebuild project ;) and desperately in need of an adventure during the long and cold east European winter I'm currently paddling (yes as in pushbike) my way from Lake Victoria to the Indian Ocean. We plan to return at the beginning of feb. and promise to get back to work both on the writing and on the second stage which I promise it's gonna be even more interesting :wink
    #21
  2. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Long timer

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    Looking forward to it!
    Do you guys have another blog where you post your non moto adventures as well?
    Also, any hints as to what the second stage might include?
    #22
  3. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Cheers! Unfortunately we got pretty lazy and our blog (www.intotheworld.eu/en) is just updated with only half of the Asian cycling bit (as China has stupid expensive rules for bringing your bike around we cycled across all the way to SE Asia last year after biking our way to Mongolia and back)
    More recent photos on FB: Facebook.com/www.intotheworld.eu or Instagram.com/2intotheworld

    As for the spoiler I'll be a cheap bastard and only say that it will include lots of CF and Kevlar cloth :D
    #23
  4. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Long timer

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    Back yet? Can you tell I'm interested in details? Ha ha
    I've been following your instagram and see you are still posting pics from Africa so I'm guessing you guys are still on your adventure!
    #24
  5. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Cheers, Africa was a blast! and on pushbike is just what you need there. I would say is the perfect way to travel on that particular continent.
    Already working on write up and promise I'll return with content pretty soon. :freaky
    #25
  6. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Ok fellas, back to the write up.

    So after riding for more than 25k around Central Asia, Mongolia and Siberia and after ripping the BAM road with a not-so-professionally-welded frame under me (a frame that fractured again near Severobaikalsk), I managed to bring the bike to Moscow. There I met Kostya, a fellow rider and 990 owner. Kostya repaired the fractures like a true artist. A couple of vodka shots later I was ready to leave Kremlin behind. Sadly my plans to ride the bike back to my garage were soon shattered. The intake rocker arm bearing seized In Ukraine. Only 500km shy from Bucharest!

    [​IMG]

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    For the next six months I struggled to solve the frame issue with KTM. So it happens that I was not doing it from the comfort of a home, but from a tent. When the frame fractured I had already the tickets for China, where I was supposed to continue my journey with Ana, on bicycles, all the way to SE Asia. That was an adventure in itself (you can read about it on our blog) and much more difficult than anticipated. Almost as difficult as it was to find a way to fix my KTM.
    In the end the Factory agreed to contribute with a discount for a new frame. Probably the fact that the bike had no service history after the first 1000km, that I’m the second owner and that my 690 was a pretty old 2009 model all weighted in the decision of the Factory not to replace the frame free of charge. Too bad for me. 'Cause in the meantime I've heard of at least one other case of 690 fractured frame that was replaced free of charge…
    Now the fractured frame had to be delivered to the dealer, so I started stripping it to the bone. But they only wanted the VIN. I ended up cutting it from the head stem and with it in my pocket I went to pick up the replacement. It'd been a year since the fracture incident!
    Now that I had all the parts laying around in my garage it was a good time to clean everything thoroughly. Also it was a good time to spend some extra hours 3D scanning some vital components (frame, engine, seat etc.) for my future project. As a true 3D scanner is pretty expensive piece of kit, I used a photometric approach. I tried different softwares, ending up with mixed results.

    [​IMG]

    Then I spent another couple of hours sticking small dots to the frame bars. The dots were to be recognized by the photometric software and translated to the 3D modeling software. This worked a bit better. Now I had a beautiful, shiny orange trellis frame sitting in my garage and another one hoovering in my computer.

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    Back to getting greasy, first I focused my attention to the fuel tank. In 28K I have never replaced the in-tank fuel filter, and it was time to do so. Having the tank out helps a bit, as the pump/regulator combo is securely tucked in and the line connectors are a bit tricky to open using a small flat screwdriver. Was planning to change the lines for intank fuel hose as inmate Uller, did but finding the special SAE 30R10 submersible fuel resistant hose proved to be pretty difficult (as no auto parts shop would carry such product and importers tend to sell only dozens of meters). I was able to find a replacement fuel filter at the auto part shop (pre ’11 models use Mahle KL15) and I also found some Mikalor hose clamps. Filter replacement is a pretty straight forward job, just use a dremel to open the two Oetiker clips and replace the dirty filter with a new shiny one. In my case, the replacement filter (not Mahle, but compatible brand) had no bevel lip (hope is the right word) at the end of each pipe, so I had to use some heat in order to make one. Cleaned the O-rings and put everything back together. Done.

    Needed parts:
    1x KL15 (or compatible) filter (post ’11 use KL97)
    2x Mikalor hose clamps


    Optional (Uller mod):
    1m (you will use less but it’s the length you’ll find it) 8mm ID SAE 30R10 submersible fuel-resistant hose
    4x Mikalor 13-15 hose clamps


    [​IMG]

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    Now I have a different opinion on the necessity to change the OEM tank bolts. I believe the reason they break is not the actual bolt, but rather the polyurethane bushing. I bought my bike at a little over 1000km and already the tank had a bit of free-play. You can feel it if you slowly lift the tank up and down using handles molded on the tail. I just used some electrical tape on all four polyurethane bushing and they fit snug in the designated space. 25K on Central Asian roads carrying quite a load (Enduristan saddles, Enduristan 51l Dry Bag, extra tires set) and had no issue what so ever.
    Time to replace the tape :p

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    #26
  7. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Next was the engine.
    Before I left to cycle in China and SE Asia, I had the chance to open the valve cover and assess the damage of the intake rocker arm bearing failure. Besides the obvious intake/exhaust rocker arm replacement I knew I had two more problems: One - a damaged cam lobe. Two - a missing adjustment shim. The first problem was easily tackled by ordering a new cam. As the difference in price was not that huge, I went with a Rally Cam that you can find in the 690 Factory Engine. Some people complain about the decrease of torque in the mid-range, but hey, I must confess that for me it’s a mix of placebo and real emotions. Once I had my target set on that part, I convinced myself that “I really needed it”
    The second problem kept me on the edge while I was opening the valve cover, then the alternator cover, then the clutch cover. All sorts of bad case scenarios went through my head. I inspected every nook and corner of the engine’s inside. Opening the engine completely in order to reach the inside of the gearbox was not very appealing. So I decided to shift my focus for the moment and to continue with the cam swap.
    With the cam out you can see the difference between the OEM and the Rally Cam. Mattighofen engineers made this engine a breeze to work on and changing a cam is just a matter of turning the engine to TDC (aligning the upper cam/case mark and the lower balancing shaft hole), taking out the automatic hydraulic tensioner (or manual, if you have one) and to unmount the camshaft holder. With the cam out (you have to be careful with the chain not to fall inside) and with no pressure on the tensioner rail, I heard the sound of relief: my lost shim was tucked behind the rail, and once the tensioner and cam were out, it just fell down. Phew!!!
    Rally cam in, both rockers in, valve clearance set and done.

    The clutch cover had a small crack that I tried to repair with some epoxy resin. Will see how long it will last. The amount of oil coming out of the crack was minimal anyway. Although I ordered new cover gaskets I decided reuse the old ones with some red gasket maker.

    Parts used:
    1x 75036061144 Exhaust Rocker arm
    1x 75036060144 Intake Rocker arm
    1x 76536010100 OEM Camshaft
    Or
    1x 76236010044 Rally camshaft


    [​IMG]

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    First shim is out.
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    The hunt for second shim begins. Come out, come out, wherever you are...
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    Setting TDC.
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    Rally Cam.
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    OEM cam is out.
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    Carefull with the time chain.
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    Victoryyyyyy!!!! Few days less of work.
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    Rally/OEM cam side by side.
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    New rocker arm (intake/exhaust)
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    They have different marking...
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    ...than the one that failed.
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    Careful with the rocker arm shaft position (flat surface facing up).
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    Tighten to spec.
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    Had to grind the valve spring retainer a bit for the shim to seat properly.
    (after the bearing failed and the after the shims jumped out, the intake rocker arms were rubbing directly on the retainer and made a small lip)
    [​IMG]

    Some of the shims had the dimension erased, so had to be checked.
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    Re-tighten and check the valve clereance (0.07-0.13)
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    New filters in.
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    Clutch case repair.
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    Clutch case repair.
    [​IMG]

    Back to my small 3D design studio: certain parts were not suitable for 3d scanning with a photometric method. Actually most of the results I got for all the metallic or painted parts were unusable, because most softwares require that the surface of the scanned object is matte and uneven. Is the reason why the photometric scanning technique is mostly suitable for topographic or architectural surveys. Still, the engine scan ended up being usable for rough shaping and sizing.

    The seat scan was also partially usable, so I decided to rebuild it, but I did not put too much effort into it as it’s not that essential at this stage. Other bits and bobs like the radiator, L/R engine support, the upper and lower triples, the handlebar, the HB clamps, the front mask, the front suspension, the exhaust header, and partially the rear tank had to be manually reconstructed. Over the weekend I taught myself another modelling software and got to work. I used generic 3D parts (wheels, brakes, etc) in order to get the feel of the whole bike.

    Seat has to be rebuild.
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    Engine is fine for rough shape
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    Let's model the rest...
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    Not too shabby.
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    It's nice to be able to test the front end tolerances for different years.
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    #27
    *kartman* and Frgich like this.
  8. MeinMotorrad

    MeinMotorrad Long timer

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    :clap

    Love the 3D stuff.
    #28
  9. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Cheers!
    #29
  10. mrgeoff

    mrgeoff Adventurer

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    Very cool video, top effort, thanks for sharing :-)
    #30
  11. ramjet

    ramjet Long timer

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    Extremely enlightening and entertaining. Many Thanks for such a detailed writeup! :clap
    #31
  12. Night Falcon

    Night Falcon Spilt milk makes me cry like a girlie girl :-(::

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    Love build threads. The attention to detail is enthralling. Makes me want to get another kayteaemsixninety :D
    #32
  13. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Thanks guys! Love to share with like-minded people :)

    For me it makes me want to get 6 of those, prep them well well and do trips "into" the world to introduce this awesome machine to any non believer, fat Beemer addict out there :p
    #33
    Frgich likes this.
  14. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Riding over 25k with the stock suspension and having a leaking fork seal made me research about options to upgrade while doing a well needed service. With the help of other inmates on the 690 suspension thread I ended up extending the front forks using EXC parts and the rear shock using a SKF seal head for KYB shocks.

    Basically any 690 fork can be extended to 300mm travel but by far the pre ’12 models are the easiest to work with. Is just a matter of swapping the springs, piston rods and rebound adjuster rods with the EXC parts. For the 12-13 years (same forks but with different trail to accommodate different triples offset) and 14-15 (compression in one leg and rebound in the other) it’s still doable but it involves machining the rods to different lengths.

    Using a WP OC Fork manual (just give ggl a hit using WP 4860 MXMA pdf) and watching some very instructional youtube videos I opened my forks, replaced the dust and seal rings with SKF parts, swapped the EXC parts, changed the shim stack from the 690 scheme to one from ’13 500 EXC for both base and mid valve and topped up with Motul fork oil to the recommended 110mm air gap. Once you get the hang of it on the first leg you finish the second one in no time. By far the most difficult part was improvising something to replace the vice clamp block. You need one to dismantle the mid valve from the piston rod. By using the hydraulic stop and the fork cap to lock the piston rod and then clamping the hydraulic stop by the metallic nut in a vice I managed to have the rebound valve out quite fast. Also by using some electrical tape you can avoid using a fork seal bullet and by cutting and reusing one of the old oil seal between the axle clamp and the new dust seal you can avoid using a seal driver. For me it worked like a charm and few hours later I had two serviced, revalved and 300mm travel extended forks.

    You start by turning both clickers fully counterclockwise.
    [​IMG]

    The front triple is in handy to remove the fork cap
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    Remove the fork cap from the piston rod.
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    Remove Spring.
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    Remove rebound adjustment rod.
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    Drain dirty oil.
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    Clam the axle clamp using soft jaws (I had to improvise)
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    Unscrew the compression holder out of the axle-clamp.
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    Prepare to make a mess :p
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    Take out the cartridge
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    Take out the dustseal, circlip
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    Heat the outer tube near the oilseal.
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    Pull the outer-tube from the inner-tube.
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    Inspect and clean everything.
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    This is how the forks looks like when disassembled.
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    Take out the piston rod.
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    You can see the EXC rebound adjustment rod is 25mm longer than the 690 "R" rod
    [​IMG]

    Same for the piston rod
    [​IMG]

    Disassembly the rebound and compression stack and replace the shims using the desired scheme (I used one from a '13 500 EXC)
    [​IMG]

    Cuting the old oil seal. It's good method if you don't have a fork driver.
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    It seats nicely on the new SKF oil seal and can be removed after the oil seal will seat properly.
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    I used some tape instead of a fork bullet.
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    Greased it well
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    Then I used the old dust seal also cut between the new seal and the fork clamp.
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    Then just pound it until the oil seal seats properly, remove the old seals, insert the circlip in place and the new dust seal.
    [​IMG]



    The rest it's pretty obvious. Is the reverse disassembly process.



    I used Motul Oil. They always helped our adventures so I'm biased.
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    Pour slowly and carefully. You don't want oil in the rebound adjuster.
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    Compress the fork up and down (see the below clip courtesy of Slevans Racing - Thanks JEFF!!!)
    [​IMG]

    I reused one rebound adjustment tube and a syringe the set the air gap height. The bigger the syringe the faster the process :)
    [​IMG]

    Insert EXC spring.
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    Tighten the fork cap.
    [​IMG]

    Parts used:
    2x 48600968 SKF seal
    2x 48600969 SKF seal
    2x 48600568 PISTON ROD D=12 L=554
    2x 48600559 ADJUSTING TUBE L=520
    1x 91410017S SPRING 4,8N/MM SET
    2x MOTUL Fork Oil Factory Line light 5W
    Shims for revalve.
    For all KTM's suspension settings just go to www.ktmshop.se, select the year and modell and you have a nice pdf with all the infos in the dokument section (shims stack, oil level, travel lenght etc)
    #34
    Maraktm likes this.
  15. DesertRatliff

    DesertRatliff Tinker Tinker Ride Ride

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    ^^^^^^
    Awesome stuff! Almost makes me want to tackle the EXC fork extension by myself. Thank you. I will be saving this post!
    #35
  16. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    If you have a pre '12 Enduro or Enduro R is not that hard to be honest. If you're used to work on your bike and have a bit of mechanical knowledge you can do it in 1-2h.

    Here are some interesting clips that helped me familiarize with the procedure:

    <iframe width="1100" height="619" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/s2kwV98lZ4Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    <iframe width="1100" height="619" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/eru0iV8sU8Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    <iframe width="1100" height="619" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/glG3gUjxjEU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    <iframe width="1100" height="619" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/24kDZHsHwDI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    And the appropriate WP OC 4860 manual can be downloaded from here.

    As for shim stack personally I used this one.
    #36
  17. jfman

    jfman Long timer

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    Great bridge crossings!

    Can you run regular fuel in the 690? What is the compression ratio?
    #37
  18. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Cheers:freaky,

    It's quite high at 11.7:1 but it runs ok with any fuel. The worst I put was 78 in Uzbekistan as they were having a fuel shortage when we crossed back in 2013.
    You can select a bad fuel map (using the under the seat switch) but I never bothered. Mine always stays on position 2 - Aggressive with a fellow inmate custom throttle curve (AMa'a RPM relative map)
    #38
  19. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Back to the suspension!
    For the rear is different. First off only 08-11 &#8220;R&#8221; models have 275mm travel to start from. The rest have only 250mm and doing this mod you only end up with ~270mm of travel. Which would unbalance the geometry of the bike if used with a 300mm extended front fork. You still have the option of buying a used &#8216;08-&#8217;11 &#8220;R&#8221; shock (they are not very expensive) or investing in a RRP Tractive Adventure/Rally Shock that has 300mm of travel.
    I&#8217;m sure that with a bit of research from someone with the right connections would be possible to find a longer piston rod from a KYB shock (complete with rebound rod) that would bolt on the 690 clevis making a 300mm travel shock from any year.
    For me was easy choice: get a SKF KYB seal head, open and inspect the compatibility with the &#8220;R&#8221; shock, get the needed shims for revalve (I used inmate &#8220;Letter J&#8221; scheme that he generously shared in the suspension thread) and send the whole package to a suspension shop for assembly (as you need a vacuum machine and about 10 bar of Nitrogen). The suspension guy also repaired the stuck rebound rod. Using a SKF seal head gives around 5-7mm extra travel which because of the linkage system translates into 290-295mm of wheel travel.
    The SKF seal head used in conjunction with the OEM spacer moves the upper seal dangerously close to the rebound hole in the shock shaft so it has to be machined about 1mm in order to move the seal away from the hole.

    Parts used:
    1x SKF.seal head SH KYB-18-46-20
    Shims for revalve.


    Desasembly is pretty straight forward. Clamp the shock in a vice.
    [​IMG]

    Release the nytrogen.
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    Open the shock body.
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    Carefully take out the circlip holding the sealhead.
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    Drain the dirty oil.
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    Take out the piston and shims.
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    690 Enduro R shock in pieces.
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    OEM Sealhead with spacer.
    [​IMG]

    SKF Sealhead with spacer.
    [​IMG]

    OEM vs SKF
    [​IMG]
    #39
  20. mrwwwhite

    mrwwwhite Been here awhile

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    Short side story.
    Upon returning from our Asian trip without any plans for future rides or means to continue our previous adventures, one thing was clear: I needed to bring back my 690 to life. Such a rebuild required a proper workspace. My garage was a 50+ year old structure, which had been neglected during my 3 years of nomadism and was now in dire need of a renovation.
    The garage was the “man cave” of my late grandfather. He’s largely to blame for my passion: he was a mechanic and the one who (alongside my late father) taught me many of the technical skills I have. I should probably mention that I was born in his car, after a vivacious New Year party. Sadly, my grandfather died before any real changes could happen in the Romania. Back in his time there were no “Home Depot” stores and he had limited supplies to do such renovations by himself. People considered themselves lucky if they managed to find the materials to build something in the first place, so they had this “fix it only if it’s broken” mentality. My grandfather’s garage used to be an E.R. for Dacia cars (as 99% of the private cars in communist Romania were Renault 12 copies, locally made @Dacia plant). Replacement parts were scarce, if at all, and a guy who was able to fabricate, to rebuild broken components or to scramble for a creative fix, was your best friend.

    So I started by throwing to the garbage all the unnecessary things…
    [​IMG]

    … took everything out.
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    My plan was to lay a new concrete slab over the old cracked one and make a nice slope at the entrance. Ana’s dad came to the rescue and we started by modifying the height of access doors.
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    Then we removed the leaky roofing completely.
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    And replaced the wooden structure.
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    New waterproofing.
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    Mixing and pouring concrete is one damn heavy thing to do, so I hired some help.
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    A bit of plastering, some white paint and a epoxy paint and…
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    Ta dah… the place is like new :evil
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    And I can begin taking the 690 to pieces.
    [​IMG]
    #40
    oldsole and *kartman* like this.