laws on sleeping outside?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by dadridesagain, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Cemeteries are quite okay, the residents never complain.

    Did have a close call once though ,camped right against the fence of one in Montana.
    Nearing dawn I awoke hearing some clicking and hissing noises. Turned out to be the automatic lawn sprinkler system had kicked into working mode. Now THAT would have been fun had I pitched the tent or only unrolled a sleeping bag among ,or on top, of those .

    Check for buried sprinklers always!
    #41
  2. pjm204

    pjm204 Long timer

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    I've camped at cemeteries, college campuses, parks, all kinds of places. I will echo something stated several times, come in just before/after dark, and leave early. Don't leave any traces, don't make noise, don't make a fire. If you don't bother anyone, likely no one will bother you. I also will sometimes follow powerline trails if I am on the right bike and camp when I find a flat spot.
    #42
  3. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day.

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    Signs at "normal" entrances (driveways, field roads, logging roads, etc.) is all that is necessary in Illinois. You don’t need a fence or purple paint perimeter. If someone is on your property without asking they are trespassing. Also I was told that it is illegal to be in a cemetery after dark in Illinois. ? And yes, I know Illinois is eff’d up!:lol3
    #43
  4. falcn

    falcn Squidless Soul

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    Just wanted to reiterate this one...

    What the link points to is a list of ADVRider Inmates that have offered sleeping space in their yards or houses for other inmates on their journeys across the county/world.

    I wish I was a more active member here and knew about it when my wife and I rode from Pittsburgh to SD and back (no not for Sturgis) last year. You sometimes get to sleep inside and get home cooked meals and hot showers!
    #44
  5. Wlfman

    Wlfman Long timer

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    Power Lines. Most have a road/trail of some sort with woods on each side. Ride back a ways and pitch your tent.
    #45
  6. superslomo

    superslomo Adventurer

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    There's some correlation with bicycle tours and camping, though a bicycle is way easier to heave over a guardrail and into the woods to properly stealth camp. I, and folks I've known have had good luck on bicycle tours just stopping in at police stations in small towns and asking whether it's okay to use the town park, and had recommendations from the cops about it.

    You're flipping a coin, in that they might say no, and leave you stuck for the night, but I've never had it happen... not infrequently they'll recommend someplace comfortable and quiet, and leave you be.
    #46
  7. Merlin III

    Merlin III Mean SOB

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    Not to be argumentative, but I disagree. Firstly, trespass laws are State specific. What is true in one State is not necessarily true in the adjoining State. Signage requirements can vary considerably. The definition of a fence can vary also. Constructive Notice also comes into play. Constructive Notice is defined as what "a person or entity should have known, as a reasonable person would have, even if they have no actual knowledge of it" (the law). Also, there are other laws you could be violating other than trespass laws. The mere tone of this discussion clearly indicates that all of us realize we are doing something (stealth camping) that may cause us legal or personal confrontations.

    I am just saying, it is much easier and prudent to ask permission to camp on private property. The only exception IMHO would be if you were in wildlands where there was very little likelihood of being noticed. Everyone has their own risk tolerance-just sayin...........
    #47
  8. bones_708

    bones_708 Been here awhile

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    Umm what did you disagree with? Sure trespass laws are State specific and often municipalities also have their own trespass laws but in every jurisdiction there must be notice given for there to be criminal trespass. I have indicated that one should be aware that "notice" may different in different locations. Assuming you read both my posts then I pretty much covered this. Also the thread is about sleeping outside not stealth camping which I've been quite clearly critical of for any number of reasons.
    #48
  9. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

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    The town cop wants to avoid any paperwork. If you are nice and obviously not a threat, criminal , they are usually glad to help, they have even called someone to get me permission.

    Rod
    #49
  10. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    your more willing trying to sleep somewhere illegally, than standing up and TELLING your wife that your gonna take the proper time needed to do the trip and actually enjoy yourself?
    grow a set my friend, and enjoy YOUR life.
    #50
  11. dadridesagain

    dadridesagain Adventurer

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    Where is the wanker filter setting?

    I ended up enjoying the hospitality of friends and family along the way, enjoyed a shower and a bed each night, didn't spend a dime on hotels. Covered 2400 miles in 4-days and had a blast.

    Monday, left Boston at 3am, covered 953 miles in 15 hours exactly arriving in Lexington KY at 6pm.

    Tuesday rode south and did the Cherohala Skyway, The Dragon, Foothills Parkway to Gatlinburg to Asheville, NC where a colleague put me up in a hotel. Total 11 hours, 450-ish miles

    Wednesday rode the Elk Mountain Scenic Hwy to the Blue Ridge Parkway, then to Mountain City, took The Snake to Bristol, then brisk highway droning to Fairfax, VA. Total 10 hours, 550-ish miles.

    Thursday, back to Boston, stopping at Revzilla in Philly to pick up some sweet alpinestars riding shoes. 470-miles, 9 hours.

    Wife happy. Balls happy.
    #51
  12. ScooterboyII

    ScooterboyII Adventurer

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    Rest stops are about the last place I'd try to sleep for more than about 20 minutes. They are very noisy and since your sleeping out in the open with people walking by all night, it's very hard to get any real sleep. Churches, parks, cemeteries, or off in the woods about a 1/4 mile works for me.
    #52
  13. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    rest stops all have trucks parked overnight. is that not camping too?
    maybe those signs mean do not set up a tent?
    i've sleep in my car at many a rest stop. no one ever bothered me.
    i'd gather a tent would be alot noisier w/ the trucks idling.
    #53
  14. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    i'd say one of the best approaches it to just put down a pad and sleeping bag behind your bike. much more low key than visible tent and if the police do check, just say it would have been unsafe for you to continue & you're leaving in a few hours. they'll let you stay for fear of causing you to move while sleep-deprivation impaired. they're mostly checking to see if you're on the run.
    #54
  15. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    that's a good one. those are paid right of ways or owned by the power company and thus the chances of someone coming around and saying to move is slim to nill.
    #55
  16. tkent02

    tkent02 Long timer

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    She can be replaced.
    #56
  17. theshnizzle

    theshnizzle Long timer

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    i have slept in a cemetary,abandoned cafe,a parkette, closed for the night gas station, a rest stop,behind a church and probably a couple other places i cant remember. I dont particularly enjoy stealth camping, i am a solo female, and sleeping so far away from anybody or anything somestimes frightens me....a little.

    I feel the safest in church parking lots nd cemetaries. islept at a rest stop years ago off 81. wasnt fun and i dozed,not slept. my bike isnt off road worthy, so that eliminates a lot off possibilities. But saving 20/ 25 bucks a night buys alot of fuel. of course, then you are sleep deprived.....oh the tangled web i weave!
    #57
  18. h2o_snow

    h2o_snow Water, snow & dirt too.

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    This is why I like ADV - different topics - different styles - different bikes but its the journey that matters.

    Have been lucky to travel in all 50 states and camp in most. Hitched across the country a few times in my youth and have stories. Reading this thread put a smile on my face.

    Stealth camping is fun and interesting. I always prefer to toss out a crappy 5x7 poly tarp and sleep under the stars - even below freezing. This allows me to rise with the sun - been there, done that, and get on the road - great to hit a local cafe at 7:30 with 100 miles down.

    Bivy sacks - have had many. They are best used below freezing due to condensation issues. Goretex is overrated. Sleeping in a bivy in a 60 degree southern Appalachian rain storm on a bald is a recipe for a wet, clammy, shitty sleep experience. I prefer a 3 pound pyramid style tent - you can toss it up in 2 minutes with 4 stakes and have decent shelter over your existing tarp/pad/bag system.

    I'll usually check my little travel atlas - out west drive a few miles off any uncontrolled interchange and look for a flat spot. Get away from the truck noise. In the east, cops, local parks, dirt side roads and cemeteries have been great resources. WTF - I'm not concerned with getting arrested - have had more the a few Leo's help me out and have been invited in for breakfast by farmers as well.

    Conversely - rest areas are to be avoided. My idea of a bivy is to crash hard and recharge the batteries - not be worried about being hassled, scared or hear idling trucks all night long. Many screwed up rest area experiences. In a pinch, in the driving rain, I have tossed out a bag under highway overpasses. Quite a few have a flat concrete ledge just underneath the road above. Lots of noise but.....dry.

    In conclusion - steath camping is a lifestyle choice - you start to get an eye. Once a lowbagger.......My primary concerns are noise and a flat sleeping area. Pretty amazing what actually works for a bivy site if you don't need to worry about a flat tent platform. Interesting what the surrounding area looks like in the morning light. Be creative - had a fine eve with Mrs. Snow a few years back. Crashed in eastern Washington on the way to a Priest Lake ID wedding at a wldlife refuge. Slept under a covered viewing platform overlooking a lake - very pleasant and...the wife approved (in the morning).
    #58
  19. westerlywinds

    westerlywinds Two Wheels-Ride it

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    My friend and I once had a wonderful camp on a hill that split the freeway in Virgina. Ahill looking down a long valley. We had stopped at a store hap pork chops and broccoli and onions cooked while watching the full moon rise .Traffic noise but no cars in sight.slept well on long grass pushed down for padding.Eggs and bacon for breakfast at sunrise then a 850 mile day on the way towards New Mexico.:D BMW R/90 @R/100
    #59
  20. theshnizzle

    theshnizzle Long timer

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    funny you mention that, i have always eyeballed the grassy area that splits freeways,some are like little forests and i bet no one but the odd cop pulls in there.
    #60