Leading leg ideas/pix?

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by iantochips, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. iantochips

    iantochips Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Portugal
    Looking to build some leading legs for my soon to be joined up VL1500/Dnepr combo. No replies to my previous VL1500/Dnepr thread so I'm trying to be more specific.

    I'm a small fella (not in the first flush of youth either!) and I just know the thing will have heavy steering. The bike alone is 300kg. My theory is that ditching all the chrome covers- there's even one on the brake caliper, why would you do that???- should save a few kg at least. I'll cut down the mudguards and generally go for a retro look. I live up a dirt road so I'll try for a paint scheme which matches the colour of the dust....desert sand I think. Ural owners might talk to me, I could pass it off as the 2013 Dnepr revival model?

    I'm doing all this in a very rural part of Portugal so it'll all be my own work. The nearest machine shop is 50 miles away. I'm a bit concerned that the lowers only have caliper lugs I can use on one side- my thinking is a robust hoop over the top which picks up on the fairly beefy mudguard mounts as well. The brakes are minimal already, so I'm planning to run two calipers on the disc. I know heat build up is a consideration but I'm not planning serious Alpine pass storming. I'll be using a sidecar brake and looking for the much better rear caliper from a later bike. Any thoughts?

    Any subframe examples gratefully received as well. Again under all the tinsel the frame looks well adapted to a fairly small subframe and is certainly strong enough.

    And the best thing? No matter how badly the thing is set up it can't possibly go round corners any worse than it did as a solo!
    #1
  2. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,075
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    [​IMG]

    On a XS650 outfit in Washington. Made by Dave in 3/8" steel.
    #2
  3. iantochips

    iantochips Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Portugal
    Neat and it won't break will it?! Thanks.

    Can't quite see how it joins to the U-shaped brace but I get the general idea. 3/8 steel is heavy- what about dural or similar? I used to live near a scrapyard with a titanium bin- we had aerospace companies nearby. That, I guess would be the answer!

    The suspension is crude enough in reality on the VL1500 that a bit more unsprung weight probably doesn't matter.
    #3
  4. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,075
    Location:
    The Bluegrass
    I don't think it does connect to the fork brace.
    As far as being heavy , yeah it is, but as Dave put it don't build anything structual from aluminum, use steel.
    #4
  5. iantochips

    iantochips Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Portugal
    Looking at it again I can see that it's not joined and doesn't need to be.

    Steel it is! I guess the best way to connect it to the fork bottom would be to cut up a spare wheel spindle and thread both parts accordingly. I can save some weight by mounting my dual caliper assembly on a subsidiary alloy plate- all loads should be in the strongest dimension.
    #5
  6. val. h.

    val. h. On the wrong planet

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    UK. North Wilts'ish

    Not as good an idea as it sounds. Titanium hasn't got the density of steel. To do this kind of job you'd need it to be close to an inch thick to ensure it wouldn't fracture in use. Titanium isn't as durable in flex tests as as steel.


    Just thought it should be mentioned. Val.
    #6
  7. iantochips

    iantochips Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    Portugal
    Thanks Val. It's not a wonder material after all!

    I based my thinking on seeing quite thin walled titanium shelled blocks on racing yachts handle some astonishing loads (I'm a marine surveyor). But it has to be said steel is easy to work, welds reliably and I've got lumps (mild and stainless 316) lying around in the shed. Choice made then!
    #7