Lectron Carb. Anyone using one on your 2T?

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Greco, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. mpatch

    mpatch Long timer

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    I run a Lectron on my 200xc-w. Havent even bothered to adjust it. All said on done it cost me about $200, I sold the stock carb that had less than 2 hours on it on which offset the cost of the Lectron.
    #21
  2. cal08

    cal08 Been here awhile

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    One more on the list of satisfied converts. I bought mine for my TE 125 after following the current threads and being annoyed at fiddling with jets - again, not hard, but a distraction to riding. Everything that has been spoken above was true in my case as well.

    1) Very smooth throttle. My stock carb throttle position always seemed to want to be someplace else. Now, I can stay at one position all day. My bike became much more predictable. I did not appreciate how much a smooth throttle affects your riding. Like others say, EFI on a 2T. I can approach challenging terrain on my terms now, if that makes sense.
    2) It did not start on first few kicks - I'm about 6. Once it's started tho, first kick every time.
    3) it didn't seem to use any fuel on my test run. 2 hours in woods, and it looked like I had the same amount of fuel as when I went out. It's really amazing.
    4) stellar purchase experience from Lectron. Inquire. Response within hours. Details firmed up. Shipped. Awesome.

    So glad I did it now.
    #22
  3. Greco

    Greco Braap!

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    Hit Aztec yesterday with the moto kids. Something is amiss. I thought it was just me, so I let one of the moto kids take my bike out. He came back saying the same thing. Seems way rich on the bottom and then rips on the top end....like a big 125. Made it really hard to ride. If I was able to carry speed, it ran just fine. Corners required a crazy amount of clutch to carry me through. Clearing a jump out of a corner was impossible. I looked in the package to see if there were adjustment instructions. I just found a note from Slavens saying.......does it leak? call us......not running right? call us.....do not adjust on your own!

    I guess I'll be calling Slavens.
    #23
  4. dmac1

    dmac1 Long timer

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    They are easy to adjust. Turn the rod 1/4 turn at a time. Did you buy the adjustment tool? You don't need it, but it makes it a little easier. Heres how to tune it: (adjusting is analogous to raising and lowering the needle...same logic..lower is leaner).

    NOTE: its important that the flat side be not just forward, but square to the bike too. I found that sometimes, after adjusting and returning the rod to flatside-forward, it wouldn't be square. I slight turn with the tool (not depressing the rod) fixes this. If its not square, it can be harder to start.

    Also, you might wanna use a caliper to keep track of settings. Measure rod length with the post end of caliper (not the jaws end)...and from end of brass insert.

    #24
  5. Greco

    Greco Braap!

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    They assured me that I would not need the adjustment tool. Thanks for the video. I think I can follow that. No need to call Slavens.
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  6. Greco

    Greco Braap!

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    Update....I did call Slavens and I'm glad I did. What I was mistaking as a rich condition, was actually a lean bog. Slavens had me richen the metering rod a full turn and see what happens. But Sir, the manual says a quarter turn at a time! Trust me, he says. Here is what I found....

    1) The adjustment is super duper easy, even without the adjustment tool.
    2) One turn richer was almost perfect.

    After riding today, I think I may be a quarter turn lean still, but it 1000% better than when I first rode it at Aztec. The bike jumps right off the bottom and has the slightest dip before ripping into the upper revs. I never would have noticed, but I tried to lug it way way down to see how it reacted and I felt it dip just a bit before it hit the midrange.

    I should have realized I was lean because it ran really well at 12k when we did St. Charles. I was looking at the silencer and I was thrown off by the spooge. Slavens said to disregard the spooge as it may just be excess left over from when I had the stock carb on. I'm much happier after riding today.
    #26
  7. pandamanprod

    pandamanprod Been here awhile

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    **Bumping up this thread.

    I'm sure this question is beat to death, but wanted to see who all has checked spark coloration after running your lectron for a while. I know it is stated on their site not to judge tuning by spark color - but Mine and a few of my buddies who run a lectron all appear to be what is traditionally a very lean bike, even after we've cranked up the metering rod to 11 and pushed it way rich.

    I've chatted with lectron and they say all is fine - they just said "Don't worry about it, your bike is getting what it needs" . Anyone have any good feedback to confirm on this? Here are my spark reference's


    Afer Ride 01.jpeg Test 01.jpeg Test 02.jpeg
    #27
  8. RideFreak

    RideFreak Torque Junkie

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    Unless you're using non-ethenol fuel and doing proper plug checks with a new plug your readings are pretty much pointless, even then the stuff you'd be interested in can't be seen in those pictures. Your important color bands are way down on the porcelain below the electrode. Have you taken a look at 4T plug recently that runs ethanol based fuels. They often look seriously lean but most aren't and the color is off compared to what you'd see in the old days. A lectron will have some leaner zones in the RPM range then a traditional 3 circuit carb which often have rich zones in their transition points. When the lecton is too lean you'll typically hear the motor pinging. I ride with some guys that I know they're pretty far on the lean side just by the mileage they're getting (over 40mpg) and they still run good, I've been inside one of the motors and it's no worse for wear. I had it apart at 100 hours of running the Lectron and it looked brand new.

    James Dean posted some AFR charts on KTMT back about 6 mos ago with all the carbs. Good reading if you're interested in knowing more.
    #28
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  9. MaParkerColo

    MaParkerColo Been here awhile

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    Chris,

    Based on your comments above does this mean you feel plug chops are no longer the way to dial in your carb settings? Just want to understand what you are implying by this as I have a 2T that will be going back together this weekend that I will need to dial in the carb on ('98 CR125R I am resurrecting from the basket of parts I bought!)
    #29
  10. RideFreak

    RideFreak Torque Junkie

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    They're ok if the chop is done right. Pulling the plug out after riding a few hours really tells you nothing unless it's super rich. You need non ethnol fuel and read the chop by looking up into the porcelain ring around the electrode. Also you need to warm the bike up on a different spark plug, swap it to a new plug and it needs to run at a constant RPM under load in the range you're concerned with for awhile. You finish by pulling in the clutch and hit the kill switch at the same time, roll to the side and take the reading. Takes room and time and you're in the winter which changes things. All of which adds up to a big PITA and not that usable on a bike where you're concerned with making power throughout the entire RPM range not just wide open. Plug chops were/are popular on race bikes especially road racers that are typically run full on the main jet. To me it's better to get a baseline starting point through research or buy a jet kit. Ride it like you normally would and see how it runs, adjust one thing at a time making notes about the changes and use those steps and data to narrow down to what you want. Pretty soon you'll know what does what and how to jet your bike. A good plug chop isn't necessarily reflective of what you want, depends on the bike. Take a KTM 300, run it with a fat pilot and they make more torque off idle and are easier to control, desirable for single track. A plug chop in that range would show it that bike to be running rich and it is.
    #30
  11. MaParkerColo

    MaParkerColo Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the detailed reply. The method you suggest is more or less what I do normally, ride it tweak it, ride it tweak it, etc. I would rather have a smoker run a bit rich anyway. A bit of pipe sponge is a small price to pay for knowing your top end is lubricated.
    #31
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