LED Auxiliary Lights

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by sanjoh, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. Sunday Rider

    Sunday Rider Adventurer Wanabe

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,258
    Location:
    North of T.Ho., Ontario
    It is a Honda ST1100. I don't have anything now. I am looking for under the main light, or fork mounted, which I worry about from the road vibrations.

    That is why I want to know the actual weight of the light and not the shipping weight.

    Thanks,
    #61
  2. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,847
    Location:
    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    I would not recommend mounting to the fairing, it will not last, the fairing will split/crack, ask me how I know this:cry. The lights mount in a single bolt so the stresses will be concentrated.

    If you added a few layers of fiberglass to the inside of the fairing after grinding off the paint it may work.

    If you find the appropriate size tbolt clamp for your forks it will work great.
    #62
  3. Gimmeslack

    Gimmeslack furthur

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,525
    Location:
    Shenandoah Valley
    Got a pic of the bar mount setup? I'm unclear how it attaches to light itself etc... Is it painted or powder, alu, steel,...?
    thx
    #63
  4. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    10,523
    Location:
    the 'Ha
    Are the flat mounts able to be rotated back to be parallel with the bracket?

    In other words, will the flat mounts allow the lights to be correctly positioned if the mount bolt is vertical and parallel to the bike? I am thinking about putting these lights on a set of hand guards.
    #64
  5. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,847
    Location:
    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    Mount pictures

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #65
  6. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    10,523
    Location:
    the 'Ha
    Thank you for the quick and thorough response!
    #66
  7. bikyto

    bikyto Dans le doute...gaz!

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,321
    Location:
    Northern Cali
    Hi, a quick question for you. Do these have the various modes of light intensity?
    Thanks!
    #67
  8. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,847
    Location:
    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    Two modes, on and off.
    #68
  9. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,847
    Location:
    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    All PMs replied to
    #69
  10. trailtrick

    trailtrick goat trail rider

    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,344
    Location:
    socal
    Got the lights, Thanks , let you no how they work after 4k miles in south america , i try it inside the shop minutes ago ,Im impress :freaky
    #70
  11. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,938
    Location:
    Chambers Bay, WA
    Come on, fellas (not you, sanjoh)--let's see some pics mounted and beam shots from happy customers.
    #71
  12. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,971
    Location:
    Gardnerville NV
    Just to clarify there is no switch in the kit? Buyer works out his own switch optioins? I do like the on/off dimmer switch.
    #72
  13. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,847
    Location:
    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    Correct
    #73
  14. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    33,271
    Location:
    8000ft.
    I don't think LEDs can work that way.. they are usually on or off.

    Or can these LED actually handle variable voltage for variable output? (though I'm hard pressed to think of a reason you'd want less light :dunno)
    #74
  15. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,971
    Location:
    Gardnerville NV
    Yeah these will work on a dimmer switch. Read the thread a bit and its confirmed. With lower light during daylight you can run them dim but still acting as look at me lights.
    #75
  16. a$$hole

    a$$hole Long timer

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,006
    Location:
    New Boston, MI

    Almost all of the high output LED flashlights have multiple power settings to choose from. And these are essentially the same thing I think?
    #76
  17. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Jerkus Maximus

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,141
    Location:
    Lowville, NY
    Hey...anybody want to trade me your spot for one of my floods?
    #77
  18. Velocibiker

    Velocibiker Adventure Antagonist

    Joined:
    May 28, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,164
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Is the lens glass?

    Anybody come up with a lens cover option similar to the lens covers for the HID aux lights from Trail Tech? If I get these, don't want to crack the lens the first time I get roosted.
    #78
  19. sanjoh

    sanjoh Purveyor of Light

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,847
    Location:
    Mountains of Central Florida:)
    Yes
    #79
  20. aalegado

    aalegado Team Gear Whore

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    481
    Location:
    Lost Wages, Nevahduh
    I like these lamps! They're now on my farkle list.

    I have to address this issue...

    This Wrong Wrong Wrong.


    If you follow this advice you will burn-out your LEDs.

    For a given LED's forward voltage (the voltage the LED requires to operate) you must always correctly forward bias a LED. That means the current going through it must be constant. This means that the series, current-limiting resistor must be a fixed value.

    By changing the resistor value, you are causing more or less current to flow through the LED—more current with a lower value resistor and vica-versa. This is because the voltage across the LED (that's the LED's forward voltage) is always the same and the resulting voltage across the current-limiting resistor is always the same (for a given LED and voltage source, that's Kirchoff's Voltage Law). If you lower the resistance, the current increases by Ohm's Law, I = V/R.

    Less is OK since that can't damage the LED but if it's too low the LED will not light-up.

    More is not OK because the LED will burn itself out.

    The proper way to vary the brightness of a LED and by extension modulate it's power consumption is to flash it on and off at a rate that achieves the brightness/power consumption you are after. This is what a Pulse-Width-Modulator ("PWM") is doing: It's flashing the LED on and off at a particular rate as well as controlling how long the "on" time is relative to the "off" time.

    A PWM flashing an LED at 1KHz (1000 times on/off per second) at a 50% duty-cycle (50% of the time "on" and 50% of the time "off") will produce a 50% brightness. It also results in 50% of the normal power consumption because half the time it is 100% on (full power) and the other half it is 0% on (zero power). That averages out to 50%. Vary the proportion of "on" to "off" and you get different, average brightness/power.

    The power controllers for heated gear work the same way—"on/off" at a given frequency and a variable duty-cycle results in power consumption ("heat") somewhere between 0% and 100%.


    Look here:

    http://my2wheels.com/forum/showpost.php?p=60606&postcount=26

    Here:

    http://my2wheels.com/forum/showpost.php?p=60630&postcount=30

    and here:

    http://my2wheels.com/forum/showpost.php?p=61049&postcount=38

    These are PWM LED drivers I made. They fit in a Altoids tin and can handle up to 3A of current.

    They are completely programmable so you can have an particular flash/dimmer pattern. I made these as brake light modulators but they can also be used to create a high/low-brightness effect in a LED high-beam/low-beam application.

    I'll post the circuit if anyone's interested and wants to BYO.
    #80