let's see a picture of your camping setup and how it all fits on your bike... please

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by ClearwaterBMW, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. panorton

    panorton Charming as F**k

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    Langley B.C.

    Thanks for the info.:D
  2. LoopGaroo

    LoopGaroo Been here awhile

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    Friendly Humboldt Park, Chicago, IL
    Simple and minimal camping setup on the TU250. Everything fits in a pair of Ortlieb bicycle panniers.

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  3. cognosticator

    cognosticator Been here awhile

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    Go big or stay home LOL
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  4. River

    River Gee

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    Location:
    Red Deer, AB
    random camping pics
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  5. CafeRacer99

    CafeRacer99 Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Tucson
    Three day trip to Sedona.

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    That's a Nemo Losi 3P tent, an Alite Mayfly chair.
  6. frogy

    frogy Been here awhile

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    I feel your pain. Three years now Ive been using a Big Agnes long inflatable pad. Great pad but with my bad back it was not good enough.
    Just used the Luxurylite mesh cot last week and love it. Will no longer need the inflato pad.:clap
  7. Scott_PDX

    Scott_PDX Leisure Engineer

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    Location:
    Portland...the newer one on the left side.
    4 day trip to Eastern Oregon Last weekend.

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    Big tent came in handy in the rain!
  8. Riteris

    Riteris Dessert Runner

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    I would be afraid of being out in the wilderness all alone and not being able to get out of that chair.:1drink
  9. duck

    duck Banned

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  10. ParaMud

    ParaMud Been here awhile

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    Looks good! The first thing I would change is the sleeping pad. I would not be able to sleep on that. I got my insulated air core for 40 bucks on sale a while ago.

    Everything else looks good!
  11. Phil

    Phil Adventurer

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    Location:
    Beauvechain, Belgium.
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    Camp site @ 960 km from home, France, Orpierre. :1drink
  12. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    im with you mate,
    i dont see any reason why camping has to be some sort of endurance or survival test, im not bear grylls "be comfy" is my motto.
  13. duck

    duck Banned

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    OK, I won't make you sleep on it.:evil

    I've always been perfectly comfortable on those blue closed cell pads. For my "real" camping gear I usually use a Luxury Lite cot.
  14. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.

    We're all friends here. The reason some riders talk about packing light and simple is that they are going to try and hit a lot of rough road or maybe a goat trail or two. And if you're going to ride 500 miles of dirt/gravel/mud/sand then the lighter and lower your weight the better. It's amazing the effect 80 pounds of camping gear can have on the arse end of a bike.

    Sure, a pillion weighs a lot more than that, but a pillion can shift her (his?) centre of gravity and even stand up when needed. I duffle can't do that.

    In the past I have asked the GF is she would please ride her own bike, that way we could have a bigger tent, some espresso in the morning, a few more comfort items. But as it was, two-up you can only carry so much kit.
  15. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.

    I think you did a bang up job for budget, temp gear. There was a time I considered doing the same-- caught out with out any gear but facing the possibility of a surprise road trip. I think you did very well considering the sort of stuff available on a budget. Luckily, plans changed for me. I can ride enough to tire myself out so that I'll sleep anywhere on anything. Getting up in the morning and making everything bend and unbend again, that's the hard part. :wink:
  16. duck

    duck Banned

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    And, since it's usually high and to the rear, it affects handling while riding street too so lighter is better.
  17. mark1150

    mark1150 Been here awhile

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    Location:
    Wisbechistan UK
    Here's mine well both actually, as my son borrowed the XR for the weekend.

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    Givi voyager throw overs and Lomo dry bag, carrying everything Tent, sleeping bag, inflatable mats x 2, spare clothes, food, stove, spare white fuel (cooking petrol) fold away chairs, beer, and bike spares inc oil.

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    My tent in the foreground with all of the above stowed.
  18. Ladybug0048

    Ladybug0048 Bug Sister

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    Thanks for posting your econocamp. I love that you have shown you can get set up for camping without spending a fortune. Some people just don't have the funds available to buy the high end stuff and they then think the fun is out of their reach. There is nothing wrong with starting econo. Once you find you enjoy camping and are going to do a lot of it you can buy better stuff as it is needed.

    There are still a few econo things I have been using since I started camping even though I have looked for "better" options but then go back to my old standbyes.

    I guess what I'm using so many words to say is you don't have to spend a fortune to go camping. :D
  19. River

    River Gee

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    Red Deer, AB
    The camping gear you take with you depends on your comfort zone and whats available for you. The difference between cheap gear and quality gear is a matter of time, less expensive gear will not last as long, but still do the job. Some is more expensive because it is lighter, more efficient, smaller, easier to use etc. Not MC related, but gear related, we have spent up to 1 1/2 months on a river rafting. Depending on where we are going, Grand Canyon=desert, Yukon/Alaska=Alpine, we take specific gear for the area. Some of the gear can range from high-end gortex to dollar store chineese crap. It all depends on whether you can get by without it when/if it craps out.

    This is our rafts packed for 1 month, six guys through the glacier country in Yukon/Alaska. Amongst all that gear is 26 bottles of wine:freaky and we had to fly out all that gear and people in a small plane. My point is you can pack small and light...if you have to:D...everyone has thier own priorities and comfort zone.

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    ...I am digging some of your guys setups...they look awesome.:1drink
  20. Biston

    Biston Adventurer

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    I disagree! bungees are priceless. We don't all have 50 gallon gs panniers.:wink: plus if you lose an eye to fight with a bungee cord your.... :fpalm