Let's see your Man Castle

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by AZcacti, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. Deans BMW

    Deans BMW Granpa Hoon

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    Rob, that would be great.
  2. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Long timer

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    Wreckluse has an amazing shop :clap He has envy :huh ? I have envy over his set up :cry
  3. wmrra13

    wmrra13 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    20
    Unfortunately that's NOT my shop. We recently bought a new-to-us house with a stand alone 24 x 34 outbuilding that the P.O. used to store a boat. Now I'm in the process of trying to make a shop out of it. I've been perusing this thread in an attempt to steal ideas...

    You guys have some nice stuff!

    I'm post some pics soon so you guys can berate me.

    Cheers,
    Tyler
  4. BygDaddee

    BygDaddee Where do I get a pie

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    I'm not going to be able to tell the wife I'm going out to the Aviary anymore
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    Because the Canary is gone
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  5. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
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    803
    Location:
    Michigan
    Hey guys I have been lurking on here for a few years. Lots of nice garage set ups in this thread! I have followed along in this thread when ever I had time the last few years getting some ideas. Well after 2 full years my man castle is finally almost complete. I'm not sure it will ever be complete because there always seems to be something else I want to do to improve it.

    Anyway a little story on this build. I acquired this little chunk of property from my parents. They have 50 plus some acres, mostly wooded, surrounding me. I lived in the city for the last ten years and convinced the wife to build here and move out in the country to put me closer to work. And I actually convinced her we needed to build the barn first so we could store our belongings after our house in the city sold. :evil So the barn went up the first year. The second year we started the house and I worked on finishing the barn when ever I had time. My father and I did most all the construction ourselves so it really cut in to any riding time the last few years. So instead of a ride report I might as well post up a build report.:lol3

    Here is the finished product to start with. 40x64 with 14ft ceiling. 16'x13' overhead door on left 12'x12' overhead on right side.

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    Here is the lot before we moved trees and dirt. The front of the barn is about where the tree line is in this pic.


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    To move the trees and dirt you need one of these. This is my cousins excavator. Actually with out his help it would not have been cost effective to even build on this lot as it was on such a slope we had to move LOTS of dirt over the next two years. This particular excavator has the moveable thumb attachment on the bucket. Great for grabbing those trees and moving them out of the way. Kinda fun too!


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    I can't find the pics of the tree removal so here is the finished grade with the barn corners squared up.


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    Used this compactor on the fill. We had about 6' of fill on the back side so I made sure it was compacted well while we built it up with the dozer and front end loader.


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    Digging the holes for the poles! I lucked out getting this little machine. This guy came over drilled all the holes for $60 bucks!


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    More to come later...
  6. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
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    803
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    Michigan
    And to continue.

    Here are the poles going up. I hired a guy with a tele-handler to come in and help put up the poles, trusses, and metal on the roof.

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    First truss set.

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    The tele-handler. They actually left it on site for over a month and said use it just fill er up when you're finished! This had to be the most valuable tool we used. Not having to climb up and down ladders was great. It has a basket that goes on the forks big enough for 2-3 people to work from.

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    I cut up 2" foam board insulation 18" wide and buried it along the inside of the foundation. Helps keep the frost from creeping under the concrete.

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    Half the roof on.

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    Now it is ready to grade and compact the floor for concrete. It was so dry the preceding weeks the sand was like powder. We needed some water and no well on site. So I called a friend who happens to be the local fire chief. A small donation to the fire dept. and you get water.

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    Lots of water.
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    After the water, grading, and compacting the vapor barrier, double bubble insulation, and wire all laid out. I was really contemplating installing in floor heat. But at this point but I kind of got pressed for time with my help I had for the concrete and decided not to do it. It worked out in the end I am more than happy with the heater I installed. More on that later.

    [​IMG]
  7. allonsye

    allonsye ("lets go!")

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    Good job! I like that you filling the empty spaces above w/storage shelving. I had a similar space once and put up rafters and plywood over the forward part overhead. It afforded an amazing amount of storage sq footage forward - basicly a floor right up to the upper edge of the overhead door when it's in it's raised postion - the area in the 1st pic where you show 2 shelves left and right - made that all one area.
  8. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    803
    Location:
    Michigan
    The finished floor.

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    After the outside walls and ceiling panel was up we started framing on the inside. I divided the barn in half for two 32x40 sections. One side is the workshop the other for storage. I heated the workshop side and have the gas lines in the storage side if I ever want to heat that also. This pic is of the start of my workbench and bathroom area that will be under a upper second story storage area.

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    OSB going up


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    This is the divider wall. I only installed R11 insulation. Don't mind a little heat over in the storage side. It has not gone below freezing yet.

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    I lucked out again on this insulation. A friend saw a local factory that was getting an addition and they were tearing down a wall. They were going to throw away all this R13 insulation. We rolled it up and I used it in the barn. It did the entire barn with some left over. On the heated shop side I installed another layer of new R11 over the used stuff.

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    Here is the R11 on top of the used R13. I left the hole in the concrete to install a bathroom at later date.

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    The work bench and cabinets framed in. Kegerator installed.

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    Work bench finished and painted.

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  9. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    :huh

    So jealous :cry

    :clap
  10. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
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    803
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    Michigan
    Here is the finished product. I bought some basic plumbing and electrical books and did it all myself. Ran all the electrical with conduit. Many people ask why I didn't run the wire in the walls. When I started I really didn't know where I wanted to put stuff like welders, air compressor, ect. With the conduit it is very convenient to add electrical any where you want in the future.

    The heated shop side.

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    I used the overhead radiant heat system. Runs on propane. This heater is very efficient. I have only used 30% of a 500g propane tank since November of 2011. I usually leave the heat on around 55 when I am not working in the shop. But the winters have been kinda mild this year and last.

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    Plumbed everything with pex. I was amazed how quick and easy it was to work with. I think it took longer going to Menards to get all the stuff than it did to install it. When I eventually get an air compressor it will go in here also so the noise will not be so bad in the workshop. It will be were I was standing to take the picture. I also have a small door in the wall behind the Kegarator where I can access the CO2 bottle in this room.

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    The storage side.
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    The storage area above the workshop. Notice the electronic device on the green cabinet. It is a signal booster for cell service. I can get full strength signal standing outside but inside the all steel building with the doors closed nothing. This device works great. Has an antennae outside and inside to boost the signal. I think I bought it off ebay.

    http://www.wilsonelectronics.com/store/display/40/46/db-pro





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  11. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Very very nice!

    Jim :brow
  12. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Amazing shop!
  13. dukethedog

    dukethedog Been here awhile

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    Nice job on your shop build- really impressive!
  14. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the replies. Next thing I would like to get is a cycle lift. I see lots of different types in this thread. Does anyone know how well the lower cost Harbor Freight ones work?
  15. dorkpunch

    dorkpunch Oops...

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    I've had my cheapo harbor frieght lift for 6 or 7 years now, and I've never had a problem with it. It'll hoist my fat old ST1100 off the ground without hesitation. One of the best / most usefull tools I have ever purchased, hands down.
  16. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

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    Do you know if they make the side extensions for it? I have ATVs I would like to be able to fit on it also. Or do you think it would be possible to fabricate some home made extensions on each side? I'm guessing it would handle the weight if it handles your ST1100.
  17. RonkoRider

    RonkoRider Wrong Island, NY

    Joined:
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    Middle of Suburban Hell- Long Island, NY
    Fired up the new heater today :
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    and installed a new shield on my R1150R
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    20,000 BTUs of sweet heat had the garage toasty in under 10 minutes. Once I insulate and install wallboard, it will warm up even faster.

    I'm torn between doing 5/8 sheetrock or tongue and groove panel siding.
  18. thisflatearth

    thisflatearth 2 wheel has been

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    Wayne, NJ
    Sheet rock way easier to modify and do add ons down the road in my humble opinion.

    Nice heater by the way
  19. dwthump

    dwthump Been here awhile

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    Sweet shop! A man that has his own crapper is very happy. I almost expected a latte machine and microwave on the counter...

    Darren

    *It's a KLR, I'll catch up*
  20. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Is that galvanized pipe and fittings you're using for gas line? Looks awfully bright.

    I prefer OSB over drywall, as it's durable. With primer and paint, it looks really nice. Poweranger's is a perfect example.