Let's see your Man Castle

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by AZcacti, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Step footings are used to save you money.

    The top of the footing has to be below the freeze line for your area when using standard footing designs. If the footing was not stepped up you would have to pay for more foundation wall height.

    Actually it appears that there could be two steps, possibly three, in the length of the sidewalls, not just one. In our area the top of footing is 42" below finish grade and the footing is usually 12" thick and 1" or 24" wide. The foundation wall goes on top of that and is usually made with concrete block and filled with grout. The anchor bolts are embedded in the top of that. There will be rebar in both the footing and wall to give it strength.

    Yes, you will want to have a foundation drain around the buried sides and extending out to daylight away from the garage to drain the water away. It is commonly called a drain tile even though it is a corrugated plastic tube with holes in it and a geofabric membrane wrapped around it to keep dirt out.

    You will also waterproof the underground walls but there are much better products for that than tar nowadays. Polywall, Bitchuthane (sp?), and others.

    I can't see the dimensions of the building but I recommend (strongly) that you make it as wide as you can afford. 26' minimum for a two car garage.

    I like individual doors too but if you have the front wall built so that you can remove the center divider with no structural changes required, so that if you decide down the road to build a boat or an airplane you can just remove the non-structural divider wall and sell the two doors and install a nice wide single door. It is always good to plan ahead to keep your options open. This will be simple if the building is using roof trusses so the front wall is not load bearing. I also like to put the man door in the front of the garage if possible. It gives more security being in plain sight and the snow/rain won't fall on your head when going in and out if you don't have gutters. Also less snow shoveling since it is not on the slope side.

    Just my 2c :lol3
  2. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    I am new at this construction stuff. I have never seen a stepped footer before, it makes sense, it is going to be buried more than enough. I would like to do almost everything myself (mainly because I am cheap) but if anyone has any advice where I may benefit from hiring someone to do one part of the job. I am thinking the footer pour and the slab pour will be sub contracted out. My experience with masonry work is limited but I think I can handle the block work. Tell me more about the various ways to seal the block from the outside.

    The structure it's self is 30' wide by 40' deep with 14' of over head clearance.
  3. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Make that perforated PVC; not that corrugated shit. Corrugated fills up with sediment and mud and the ridges hold it there, even though you put a sock on it.

    [​IMG]
  4. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Long timer

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    Do you have to cover the PVC in a landscape type fabric?
  5. kenny61

    kenny61 Crazy Idiot

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    either cover it in a sock or even better lay fabric under it. then up the dirt wall. fill spcae bewteen dirt wall and foundation with gravel up to about 6" of finish height then lay fabric over gravel and cover with soil
  6. kenny61

    kenny61 Crazy Idiot

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    I finally got my garge door installed

    [​IMG]
  7. HapHazard

    HapHazard Waiting for Gudenov

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    ^You're dog looks guilty.:lol3

    Nice door!
  8. kenny61

    kenny61 Crazy Idiot

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    He does :lol3, but its actually just a mid turn shot. he can sense when any camera is being used and will usually pop into the shot just as the shutter clicks
  9. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Excellent! :clap
  10. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Don't use landscape fabric. They make a specific sock-like, screen material that fits over the pipe. It's kind of a PITA, but, you have to use something to help stop solids from getting into your drainage system.
  11. radguzzi

    radguzzi The Journey is the Reward

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    If you have hillside to deal with then it is a viable option. My home built in 1985 and garage built in '91 both have extensive frost walls below grade and stepped foundations. As mentioned, excellent drainage plan is a must, pitch away from the structures a plus.

    I personally would not do the concrete myself, I did not, I hired excellent mud monkeys to do that. Well worth it in my opinion.

    I built the structures but hired out anything that had to do with mud, foundations, chimneys and sheetrock taping.

    Anyway, the foundations are dry as a bone to this day, use PlyBar Plus in the floor also before pouring the slabs in the foundations... keeps frost and moisture at bay.

    Nice, simple design you have there.

    Best,
    Rob


  12. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Wise men know their limits. :evil
  13. bymbie

    bymbie Adventurer

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    Why did you contract out sheetrock taping? I thought it's relatively painless... at least it was last time I did it. I'm about to finish the drywall in the shed... just have to entice my electrician buddy to come over and do some wiring before. Than off to do the floor.

    Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk 4 Beta
  14. radguzzi

    radguzzi The Journey is the Reward

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    I wanted the finished walls to look good... I was not certain that I could do that good of a job and I did not want to put myself under that pressure. The job was fairly cheap by comparison to my trying it and really having the job suck... :lol3

    It is also the same reason I hate to do body work, I would rather build three engines than push sandpaper on one tank. I like to support the local economy. :1drink

    Now, see, you can do the electrical and not have to wait on that Buddy. Unless that is not allowed by code in your area.
  15. bymbie

    bymbie Adventurer

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    I don't mind sanding/taping etc, but very uncomfortable with electric work... Supporting your local economy is always a good idea.
  16. Deadly99

    Deadly99 Fast and Far

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    My new garage got delivered last week...will post some details once I get in finished

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  17. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    Very cool! Did you place it directly on the gravel?

    Looking forward to more info and photos!

    Jim :brow
  18. Deadly99

    Deadly99 Fast and Far

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    Ya just dropped it right on the gravel. Its 14x30 with an insulated wood floor (Canada eh).

    Next couple of weeks...electrical, insulation, heat system, drywall, etc...but for now a cooler and....

    [​IMG]


    :freaky
  19. alii1959

    alii1959 Been here awhile

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    Here's mine. A 16x20 carport with a 10x12 shed in the back. Dirt has been recently carpeted:D...keeps the dust down. Ain't much, but it is the best I have ever had. Future plans for a concrete floor. The Road King hasn't complained at all. Maybe she likes it.

    [​IMG]
  20. ducnut

    ducnut Long timer

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    Yeah, I'd live in that. :evil