Let's see your Man Castle

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by AZcacti, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. brooks

    brooks Been here awhile

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    Jul 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    335
    Location:
    Port Angeles
    Sweet Mother!!!!
  2. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    340
    Location:
    Parker, CO USA
    I am new to this site, but been lurking for awhile. Enjoying everyones man castles, lots of cool shops and ideas. I'll try and post a few pics of mine. A bit crowded but working on more space.
    Here's the main working area, and a couple of views. Oh! I'm an addicted Vintage Japanese Bike collector and retired. So this is my fun time:lol3
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
  3. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer

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    Jun 17, 2010
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    1,527
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    Anchorage Alaska
    WOW !!! :wings :bow
  4. foggy50361

    foggy50361 Adventurer

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Oddometer:
    74
    Location:
    God's back garden, Wales
    Retired millionaire:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap

    As they say if it make you happy! Carry on!!!!!!!!
  5. crosscountry

    crosscountry Bear went over Mountain

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    Jan 14, 2005
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    2,500
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    At the corner of flat and mountains
    That looks like a bike shop from the 70s! Awesome:clap
  6. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    340
    Location:
    Parker, CO USA
    Thanks for the compliments. I'll probably hang out a lot in the "old school" section:D
    Sign just inside the door says "caution: entering a 60s time warp".
    Your not the first person who thinks it looks like a '70s shop. Most of the bikes are from the sixties. I allow up to '75 for my collection. Still have a few newer, such as late 70's and up to '82 now, but they will soon be expendable. Still have more that I can't get into the picture or in another area.
    I enjoy cranking up the '60s tune's on the sound system and just mentally drifting back to a happy carefree time, while doing maintenance or frame up restorations. I rode around a lot on the small tiddlers then, dreamed of having the bigger bikes. Now I've finally made that a reality. The shop has two lifts, one for maintenance and one for builds. Also an engine area and cleaning/blasting area. Had intentions to put in a paint area, but since that's not really in my skill set, I farm it out, when needed.
    I really enjoy going to Bike show's and showing bikes while meeting people. Also attending auctions whenever possible.
  7. Vincenthdfan

    Vincenthdfan Been here awhile

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    Apr 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    553
    Location:
    Olympia, Washington

    Would you like to adopt a 48 year old??

    I don't eat or drink too much and I love classic Japanese bikes very much!!

    :D:D:D:D
  8. Import

    Import Been here awhile

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    Dec 31, 2012
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    346
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    bc
    Holy...... That is an awesome collection.....think I've ridden a few of them...congrats and continue the good work..
    (ps..I'm showing this to the misses...I really can justify more projects..)
  9. CrustyD3mon

    CrustyD3mon Been here awhile

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    Jan 4, 2010
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    283
    god damm...what an amazing collection man...:freaky
  10. Patriot4570

    Patriot4570 Trail Blaster

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    Aug 5, 2002
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    Location:
    First Coast
    Very nice collection ,thanks for sharing.:freaky
  11. drtbkmic

    drtbkmic A Real Gem

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    Jul 15, 2008
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    119
    Location:
    Dayton, Ohio
    Nice! I have often dreamed of doing what you are doing with small "moped" type bikes. I think that would be a blast. Would love to walk through the row on the far right. Enjoy!
  12. TeneRay

    TeneRay 2>4

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    Aug 16, 2009
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    2,258
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    2-D, OH and SoVA
    Good gosh. When are the tour hours?
  13. Tech23

    Tech23 Been here awhile

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    Oct 31, 2007
    Oddometer:
    475
    Location:
    Arizona Desert
    More proof...there is no such thing as a garage that's too big. No such thing as you have too many motorcycles for that matter. Good thing most (if not all) of these bike are kick start. It would be a full time job rotating a fleet of battery tenders. Looks like you're enjoying the fruits of your labor.

    Tech23
  14. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    340
    Location:
    Parker, CO USA
    Tech23 said:..... It would be a full time job rotating a fleet of battery tenders.

    All have kick start, but most have a battery ignition system. Just some of the trail bikes have magneto ignition, but then if you run without a battery, any bulbs that are turned on will blow out. The battery is the regulator in most early Japanese bikes.

    Believe me, keeping batteries in good condition through the winter is a busy routine, however not as bad as keeping carbs from gumming up with the dreaded ethanol we have for fuel. All bikes get stabalized fuel all the time, not just for winter. Then I don't have to worry about the ratio.
    I try my best to be a rider not hider, but keeping more than about 20 available to ride is no longer so easy for me (I use to come home from work and ride 4 bikes about 4 to 6 miles each, then a different 4 the next day etc. etc.... As I'm getting older, It will probably be more likely to have 6 ready to ride at all times. It's now getting time to start the long process of battery and fuel removal for this winter. At least each battery is labeled as to which bike it came from. (I only made that mistake once:lol3)

    Some batteries getting ready for winter
    [​IMG]
  15. Tech23

    Tech23 Been here awhile

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    Oct 31, 2007
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    475
    Location:
    Arizona Desert
    Look at all the 6 volts, I can't say I envy that part of your collection...lol. When I lived back east between all the trucks, bikes, ATV's and yard equipment I had to have a bulletin board so I could keep track of which vehicle got oil changes and when. Out here in the desert batteries don't last long even on a battery tender unless the garage is air conditioned. In the summer my garage cools down to about 100° at night. I park the bikes during the summers triple digit temperatures. They stay on battery tenders all year long.

    Tech23
  16. RickS

    RickS Been here awhile

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    Dec 12, 2006
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    Altus, OK
    Wow
  17. foggy50361

    foggy50361 Adventurer

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    Jul 18, 2013
    Oddometer:
    74
    Location:
    God's back garden, Wales
    Just to point out how lucky you guys in the States are, I'm guessing there are approx 60 bikes in the photo's and not including the cost of insurance to have all those bikes available to ride in the UK would cost you around $7000 before you turn a wheel.

    I am so envious
    :bueller

    Just thought I'd point out, that's every year
  18. Poweranger

    Poweranger Been here awhile

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    Aug 15, 2009
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    803
    Location:
    Michigan

    Full coverage insurance on all those bikes in the US would cost around 14000-18000 yr I am guessing. They will get your money one way or another. If I were fortunate enough to own a collection like that and only rode them a few miles in circulation there would be some plate swapping going on.
  19. longtallsally

    longtallsally Yeah I'm a chick

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    Apr 18, 2006
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    BACK IN THE STATES!!!
    Oh don't worry, we're headed that direction- just watch the news... :fpalm
  20. Rizingson

    Rizingson Vintage Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    340
    Location:
    Parker, CO USA
    Just wanted to clear up some speculation on costs etc.
    When I built this shop, about 4 yrs before retiring, I had an approximate number of how many bikes I still wanted to have and be able to maintain. (mostly the bikes I owned during the '60s and '70s and then soon after the ones I dreamed of owning as a teenager) Once the disease (collecting, hording whatever you want to call it) hits. The thrill of the hunt just takes over. I now have bikes from Florida, Maine, Washington and So. California and most states in between. In hindsight, I should have doubled the size originally planned. That would have accommodated my collection and still left space to easily access each one as well as do the necessary maintenance etc. The number of 60 was mentioned, maybe in those photo's, but the number is actually higher. (Let's just say I've invested over 6 figures into my hobby) Very few are licensed for the road, but all (except a couple of roller parts bike's, ie a Honda S90 and a Yamaha YA6 currently being used to complete like bikes) are insured by Hagerty, a company specializing only in collectable vehicles. Each policy is for an agreed on stated value, as well as some restrictions that are tailored to my needs. I can ride each 200 miles per year, so they have liability coverage for that as well as roadside service. They are also insured when I transport to shows and at the show itself for damage or theft of parts etc. They must be stored in a locked and secured storage. This coverage can still be gotten for just under a 1000 US dollars a year for all combined. As far as DMV costs, eliminating the plates and only paying for sales tax and title transfer saves about 60 to 100 per bike. I have 2 police/sheriff's living within a mile of my place that are willing to come over and do the VIN verification for all out of state bike for free! I really appreciate that, as I don't have to load and haul and pay for that service. Obtaining a dealer plate has come up, but cost about 6000 per year and have other requirements as well, so not really an option for me.
    Riding each about every 2-3 wks is necessary to keep the systems working. Fortunately I live on a 1 1/2 mi private paved loop that has some nice curves and hills. Great for exercising the smaller tiddlers, as about 50mph is all that can be safely attained. Also within a half mile I can get on unpaved roads and ride for 20 miles without ever encountering a car or fortunately a sheriff:rofl
    As far a continuing to grow the collection, there are very few models left that I am interested in. I think there are only 3 or 4 Honda models sold in the US during the 60's that I don't have. I've never centered my attention on any particular model or size, so working on them is always new, different and enjoyable. One of each model is more my style as I am intrigued by the engineering and style of each and insist on originality, then appreciate it for what it is. For instance, I picked up a dealer brochure back in '67 that has Honda's full lineup for that year. I used to dream & drool over it as a 16yr old kid. Now every bike model in that booklet is in my shop as well as many Yamaha's, Kawasaki's and Suzuki's also. While being acutely aware of how blessed I've been, chasing this dream has also been hard fought and having a wife that allows this kind of compulsion is something I'm also thankful of. As a trained mechanic, back in the early seventies, I've been asked many times to work on someone's vintage bike, but always politely turn them down, because I don't want my retirement hobby to become a Job which would no longer be fun. I've done that with other hobby's and got burned out real quick:eek1 I do share technical advice and historical info on several forums/groups as a way of contributing, inspiring and helping other vintage enthusiasts.
    Moral of this whole story: Build the biggest man cave you can afford for your bikes, you may need it sooner than you think!! :lol3:lol3:lol3