letting the engine rest?

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by damasovi, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. cdwise

    cdwise Long timer

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    I spent Weds night with the folks who are riding the Scooter Cannonball and what I saw was that exhausts were failing when the engines cooled after riding through 109f head at or near WOT for most of 300 miles. The vintage scoots were found that the heat issues they experienced were resolved by removing the cowlings which dropped the temps 40f and kept them running well.

    So my view would agree with those that say shutting them off would be more likely to create problems than solve them.
    #21
  2. rv-rick

    rv-rick Been here awhile

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    Not just scooters and aircraft that need a breather. The owners manual on my Dodge turbo diesel says that after pulling at or near max GVW, the truck should run at a fast idle for 2-5 minutes before shutdown, otherwise the the turbo can fry. I guess it was good advice. I've got 213K on it so far.
    I do remember reading a while back that some of the Buddy 125 and 150's would overheat if run full throttle for long periods. Anecdotal evidence, since it was on a blog.
    #22
  3. gogogordy

    gogogordy Long timer

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    Letting the turbo cool off, isn't actually letting it the engine rest. Its the opposite in fact... preparing it be turned off and slowly ccoling things before a period of no use. The engine and turbo would actually be happier not being turned off, "but if your going to,here's how" is how I understand things.

    If the manual said to "stop driving the vehicle whenever X happens", that would be a different story. I doubt that it says that though.

    The Buddy 170 is fuel injected, and the electronic fuel injection starts to cut out at certain temps, as a fail-safe to KEEP the motor from overheating. It's intentional and the scooter can still be ridden, it just forced you to slow down enough to drop thetemperature. The 125 and 150 models do not do this.
    #23
  4. DudeClone

    DudeClone Long timer

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    i was told to do this during initial break in. otherwise never heard much about it unless as btcn said under extreme heat and less then optimal riding / cooling conditions
    #24
  5. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Fuel injected engines do indeed vapor lock, at least air cooled aircraft ones - you can try a good high pressure fuel pump purge and that usually prevents or clears it, but I've been stuck before precisely because of vapor lock. (EG IO520 on a 206) They are mechanical systems, perhaps that's why. They can also over temp if immediately re-started on a very hot day at altitude when you have a long taxi and then takeoff. Its can be like a ticking bomb, the key was to minimize the taxi. If you waited 40 minutes or more with the engine shut down the residual heat would be less and you'd lessen the risk. OK, these are air-cooled aircraft engines, not a water-cooled scooter engine.
    #25
  6. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    One final thought: I work with railway locomotives. Fuel-injected diesels.

    American locomotives in the field are, by car and truck standards, amazingly old. Right now I'm working with two 1969 switch engines. One was rebuilt a few years ago; the other not in the last 20 years.

    That's not typical but it's not shockingly old. I used to work for a major American railroad company; and we'd have locomotives as old as 1965 in regular service...this only about six-seven years ago.

    AND...up until this environmental panic of five or so years ago, and the artificial spike in fuel costs...these engines were NEVER shut down except for maintenance! Not to fuel. Not to add oil...the engineer checked oil levels with it RUNNING. Not even when not used...they'd be left to idle; but almost never shut down.

    In fact...with truck and other diesels moving to ethylene glycol antifreeze solutions in the 1950s, railway diesels never were modified or designed for antifreeze. They used WATER, up until just a few years ago; and a majority of units in the field today, still use straight water and cannot use ethylene glycol coolant.

    My point is...THIRTY YEARS of these things idling or running constantly...shut down only for oil changes or major work...and they last forever. No, engines don't need rest. A user would get MORE use out of one, by not overloading it, but never "resting" it!
    #26
  7. bbishoppcm

    bbishoppcm It ain't a moped.

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    Same is true for incandescent light bulbs; they can burn for decades if never shut off. It's the expansion and contraction of the filaments through on/off cycles that kills 'em.
    #27
  8. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    Shutting the human heart on and off a few times tends to greatly reduce its life too.
    #28
  9. DudeClone

    DudeClone Long timer

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    Hi Casey

    What engine lube do these loco's take? Is it Shell Rotella T? :huh
    #29
  10. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    Honest to Godfrey, I don' t know. It comes out of a hose at the fueling station (on major rail lines); on our little short line, the oil is in a giant plastic vat on a pallet. A thousand gallons...no-brand brand. Bought by lowest bid.

    And those engines keep on running.
    #30