Lifting bags

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Spinalcracker, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. Spinalcracker

    Spinalcracker former redriderofma

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    Has anybody ever seen a small lifting air bag you could carry on your bike than when you drop it and are by yourself you could pump it up to help lift the bike?
    #1
  2. bete

    bete misguided adventurer

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    My bike buying policy is never buy one bigger than I can pick up. Having said that I,ve never heard of such a air bag for personal use, I know the make big ones for lifting trucks and such. bete.
    #2
  3. Spinalcracker

    Spinalcracker former redriderofma

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    So then you must only ride bicycles:rofl
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  4. skyguy

    skyguy Been here awhile

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    So, I need to carry a 100-lb girl with me all the time?


    I'm okay with that.
    #4
  5. hamiamham

    hamiamham Been here awhile

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    arb, bushranger, etc make lift bags powered by the exhaust. kinda over-kill but if you have the space and a bad back ..
    #5
  6. Dcc46

    Dcc46 Been here awhile

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    Umm Yes :raabia
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  7. oclv454

    oclv454 Been here awhile

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    How about a small airbag to put under my skid plate to lift the front tire off the ground to change a tube in the field. Somtimes there are no big rocks around..............
    #7
  8. katbeanz

    katbeanz earthbound misfit, I

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    http://www.endurostar.com/

    To the OP, been thinking about a long pneumatic chipping hammer bit, and a couple pieces of telescoping pipe connected together. Round shank of the bit goes in the steering tube, pipe gets used as a cheater. :hmmmmm
    You could probably have the pipe do double duty as a trail stand, like above.

    There was a recent post on dropped bikes, using rope, setting up a Z-drag, and using a scrounged tree limb as a directional.
    #8
  9. Spinalcracker

    Spinalcracker former redriderofma

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    This is why I was thinking of this

    .[​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    I was riding alone and got careless playing in the mud. I can pick the bike most of the time but this was really weird. The wheels were higher than the bike so it was lifting up hill. The more it tried to turn the bike around the more the handle bars dug in to the mud.

    [​IMG]

    So I was thinking of a small air bag about 4 inches in diameter that I could hook up to my best rest tire pump. It would only have to lift the bike about 24" just enough for me to get a grip and lift. it would only have to lift 500 lbs max.

    This company makes big ones for rescue operations.

    http://editiondigital.net/publication/?i=79524&p=22
    #9
  10. RogerWilco

    RogerWilco Been here awhile

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    There is a product called the "Save Your Back Jack" that will lift a fully loaded Harley touring bike. It is very heavy-duty. It weighs a ton, but it will get the job done.
    #10
  11. Vanishing Point

    Vanishing Point A very sad panda

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    I know it sounds stupid but a small shovel or a trowel might have worked in that situation. Dig some small holes where the tires touch the ground and the bike might have been easier to tip upright.
    #11
  12. oclv454

    oclv454 Been here awhile

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    I have the Endurostar stand. It's awesome. Got it to use on my DRZ400S. I used it last week on a friends KLR when he picked up a nail in his rear tire/tube. It worked perfectly, and we were pushing and pulling on the bike to get the rear tire back in and it never wobbled. (Then we realized how easy it was to get the tire in after we removed the rear brake). Not sure if it will hold up the F800GS but I'm going to bring it to Alaska with me.
    #12
  13. astrolump

    astrolump Been here awhile

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    I pretty much always travel alone and remote...so far I have no problems picking my klr up, even fully loaded..i get lots of practice :clap
    however last year on the TET-s i ended up off and nearly in a very steep and slippery ditch...it got me to thinking about the long walk out if i wasn't able to drag her out...

    so in preparation for this summers festivities i picked this up.....
    [​IMG]

    only weighs about 10lbs with all the tackle....its a bit spendy but there is an $80 knock off option with steel rope rather than spectra.

    as a bonus......i have 50' of extra hammock hanging line :rofl
    #13
  14. josjor

    josjor Long timer

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    I'm going to assume that the bike is not still on that muddy road, correct? That means you got it back to the upright position without the airbag contraption. :D

    I did a similar thing with my KLR, though it was on hard ground. The difference was the incline was about 40 degrees and ten feet below me was a straight 30 foot drop. :eek1 It took a lot of effort, some choice words, and possible spotting of my underwear, but I eventually got it upright and back up the hill.

    Moral of the story: A lot of the fun of this type of riding is overcoming adversity not with fancy tools, but with hard work and ingenuity. I firmly believe that "adversity" and "adventure" share their first three letters for a reason.
    #14
  15. Spinalcracker

    Spinalcracker former redriderofma

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    I was meeting a friend and called him to tell him I needed help so when he arrived about 20 mins later we popped the bike no problem.

    The point is I wanted to do it myself.. I was looking at that winch. Looked nice and compact.
    #15
  16. SantaRosa

    SantaRosa I'd rather be lost

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    What if you use a (ball bearing metal sheave) rock climbing pulley system? You would save big $ over a Warn, weigh less and still provide extra hammock line. I really have no idea if that would work but just thinking that if you could get a 5:1 or better system layout it might be a good option.

    The wench or pulley system is really no option if there is nothing to tie it to, an air bag system on the other hand could work most anywhere.
    #16
  17. Spinalcracker

    Spinalcracker former redriderofma

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    I sent an email to this company: http://matjack.thomasnet.com/category/matjack-low-pressure-lifting-cushions?plpver=1001
    See below.

    They have a "contact us" page so maybe if everybody sends a similar email they may consider it.


    "Greetings

    I am looking for a small airbag, 4 inches to 6 inches in diameter, round or square, and will inflate to about 24-36 inches to lift a motorcycle when it falls over. It just has to lift the bike high enough so I can get ahold of it and lift it the rest of the way.

    I ride adventure motorcycles and there are times when I'm riding solo, off road and need something to help lift the bike if it falls over.

    The bike with gear will weigh about 500 lbs. I am thinking of a round bag that can be easily carried in a saddle bag that can either be pumped up with a hand or foot pump or I carry a small compressor to inflate tires that can run off the bikes battery.

    I know there would be a market for this since it is a common problem with solo riders".
    #17
  18. steve_k

    steve_k Long timer

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  19. jbhawley

    jbhawley WTF- Gus?

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    If you are gonna carry all that crap with you in the anticipation of a fall....why not just learn how to pick the bastard up. I can pick up a downed Goldwing...that weights close to 1000# loaded.

    Gheesh...pansy!

    Wait...i gottat get my lift bag out and call OSHA to set up a parameter and safety cones and a spotter....

    FUCK A DUCK...what is your back and legs uses for??? Sitting on your ass at Starbuck drinking fucking lattes?

    MAN UP!!!!
    #19
  20. JoshBMW

    JoshBMW Been here awhile

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    That is a good idea! Throw in a self locking (I don't know the right term) pulley and you could dam near pull/drag/lift a bike out of almost any mess.

    There are times wet off road were traction and the angle will fight you picking a bike up. Or as God fobid you end up with one off the trail and down any sort of grade.
    #20