Loctite

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by lightsorce, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. a109drvr

    a109drvr Adventurer

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    Hey Dirty,
    Read this whole thread, quite an education - thanks!

    I've got a few questions about my dodge truck. For sealing differential covers would you recommend 598 RTV? These covers don't use gaskets. The repair manual calls for red Mopar silcone sealant or equivalent.

    Can I use 518 on my transmission pan and get rid of the gasket? It perpetually weeps every time I change it whether I use an oem or aftermarket gasket. Clearance shouldn't be an issue without the gasket.

    Lastly, is there anything I can use that will stop the corrosion on brake caliper bleed valves? I don't have a problem with them sealing, but I'm in the rust belt and tired of using cans of kroil and hoping I don't snap them off.
  2. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    Indr- I saw this post the other day and forgot to get back to the answer.

    Ding Ding Ding!

    The link of the product posted is exactly what I'd go with. Good call!

    Dirty
  3. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    For stamped assemblies like a rear diff. cover, the gaps are all over the place. Around the bolt heads you'll have a minimal gap, then when you tighten up the bolts, the cover will bow ever so slightly as you torque the bolts. Don't ever use a red RTV on anything that involves fuel, oils, or ethylene glycol-the RTV will break down and leave a drip/puddle on the carport floor. You want to use an RTV like the aforementioned 598, Instant Gasket, or any other RTV that says somewhere on the tube "Sensor Safe" These types of RTV's fall into the oxime cure family rather than the vinegar smelling rtv's which are acetoxy-cure RTV's.

    For what it's worth there are many different colors of RTV's in each of the two main single component RTV retail consumers have acess to.

    As far as the Transmission pan, more than likely, it is a stamped part like the differential cover. The same holds true with gaps that are all over the place. For wildly fluxuating mating gaps, this is when we choose a suitable RTV.

    Gasket Eliminators like 515, 518, 510, etc are for rigid gasketed assemblies where once two parts are mated and torqued up, the gaps are minimal- normally no larger than 0.005" to 0.010". An example of a rigid assembly on an engine would be where the jug mates to the case, or the jug mates to the head, or where the engine case halfs mate.

    Good questions-keep 'em coming.

    Here a stump the band question for everyone-
    Who knows why its so difficult to bond glass?

    Dirty
  4. nnichols

    nnichols Slave to the Machine

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    I'll bite. Is it because its too smooth and not enough pores or grains to attach to?
  5. buickid

    buickid Lets ride!

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    Low energy material?
  6. DC2wheels

    DC2wheels Castle Anthrax troll

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    It probably has something to do with the fact that glass is actually a "super-cooled liquid"?

    It VERY SLOWLY flows. Look at a very old pane of glass- it is thicker at the bottom than at the top.
  7. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    Ding Ding Ding!!!! Circle gets the square!

    Glass is actually a liquid. Liquids are tough to bond.

    If you ever go into very old houses-the kind that still have wavy glass that has it's original window caulking, more often than not the caulking near the bottom of the pane has been busted out, while the caulking at the top is still in good shape. This happens because the glass settles or sags over long periods of time.

    Dirty
  8. rufus

    rufus We're burning daylight...

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    #39 pages so far.......


    It would save us all a lot of trouble if there was a chart somewhere that listed ALL the products (gasket sealers, thread lockers, gasket eliminators) and explained in PLAIN ENGLISH exactly what they are to be used for and where they shouldn't be used. How to apply them and how to remove them. I think that just posting a chart like this would improve sales immensly.

    We want details.
  9. H96669

    H96669 A proud pragmatist.

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    You shouldn't repeat that myth, been debunked many times over. Lower caulking gets damaged from condensation dripping down and swelling the wood at the bottom of the pane. Much worse when it freezes then thaw. I have restored enough of them old wavy panes windows, some close to a hundred years old to know.

    Couple hundreds of them old panes in my little house and there will be many more when I close in the back porch with them old cedar framed school windows I have to restore someday.

    Flowing glass maybe but.....:

    Viscosity depends on the chemical composition of the glass. Even germanium oxide glass, which flows more easily than other types, would take 10^32 years (100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) to sag. Zanotto calculates. Medieval stained glass contains impurities that could lower the viscosity and speed the flow, but even a significant reduction wouldn't alter the conclusion, he remarks, since the age of the universe is only 10^10 (100,000,000,00).

    From there and there are many others:

    http://www.glassnotes.com/WindowPanes.html



  10. cwc

    cwc .

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    I need to bond some cloth, cotton I think, to some coroplast (sp?) which is the corrugated polypropylene sheet material used in political lawn signs.

    This will be for use inside a van.

    The sheets will be 1 ft. X 4 ft. and there will be three of them.

    I'd like to use a spray-on adhesive if possible and hopefully be able to buy it at Menards, Home Depot etc.

    I would like product suggestions and if known what the coverage per container will be.

    I looked in the Loctite consumer product selector but didn't find info on specific materials.

    TIA for any suggestions.
  11. NordieBoy

    NordieBoy Armature speller

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    Any contact adhesive should be good.
    Spray on both surfaces, let dry, press together...
  12. buickid

    buickid Lets ride!

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    +1 on NordieBoy. 3M Super 77 or equivalent will work wonders. Once it sets up... its gonna be there for a while.
  13. Kannonball 88

    Kannonball 88 Been here awhile

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    Does Locktite 242 have a shelf life? I have several small bottles in the shop that may be as much as 10 to 15 years old. The contents are still liquid and look the same as new 242, but will it still work as well? (hope this hasn't been covered already - couldn't find topic in search.)
    Thanks,
    Bruce
  14. fallingoff

    fallingoff Banned

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    if so explain the glass windows in europe

    thin at the top

    thick at the bottom

    not like me i'm thick from top to bottom

    lol
  15. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

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    Hand poured glass panes are thicker on one end than the other due to uneven cooling as the glass is poured. Modern glass is made in an entirely different way so that is is of uniform thickness. http://chemistry.about.com/od/matter/a/Is-Glass-A-Liquid-Or-A-Solid.htm

    I am constantly amazed at how myths get propagated when actual facts are so easy to find. Seriously.....less than 10 minutes of searching yielded dozens of papers on the physical, and chemical properties of glass. Amorphous solids rule!

    As for why it's difficult to "glue" glass.......there are very strong covalent bonds between the silicon and oxygen in the glass. What that amounts to is there are very few free electrons for anything else to bond to, so chemical bonding is difficult. Physical bonding is difficult for the reasons previously stated...the relative smoothness of the surface.
  16. fallingoff

    fallingoff Banned

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    ok

    but why all thick on the bottoms of the windows

    i'll ask my sister

    chief material for nasa

    ur spoiling what i thought was a fact

    live and learn

    cheers
  17. GSWayne

    GSWayne Old Guy nOOb

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    If glass flowed it would be impossible to make accurate optics and things like telescopes and camera lenses would quickly become useless. Good optics are precise to almost atomic dimensions and will hold that precision for years.
  18. fallingoff

    fallingoff Banned

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    quote from sister at nasa

    ''Glass is technically a liquid. However the time to flow so you could see it is very long. Early glass makers did not have the float glass system and so making flat glass was tricky. It was naturally uneven. It would be natural to put the thick part at the bottom.
    Glass does not have long range order,I.e. the atoms are not arranged regularly to make a crystal structure.''

    well that explains that urban legend

    cheers
  19. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    recommended loctite retaining compound for o.d. of seals with nitrile coating? seal surface is good, seal went in tight. it still likes to push itself out after a few hours of hard running......
  20. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

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    If the ID of the hole is ferrous OR non-ferrous I'd hit the mating surface of the seal with a quick shot of 7649 Primer N to activate the surface, then apply a thin bead spread around the metal hole with a Q-Tip any of the thicker viscosity retaining compounds. This should work fine.

    Remember, a thinnish bead. We're trying to minimize the squeezeout to the innards of the engine. Don't glob it on-thus the Q-Tip trick to help you better control the amount of retaining compound you apply.

    Then gently drive the seal into place and let it sit overnight.

    As far as a specific product suggestion in absolutely no order of importance: 620, 609, 680, 603, 660.

    Good Question, Great Application! Thanks for asking-this question and answer will get someone out of a jam one of these days.

    Dirty