Long story long-- do I want a tw200 or a dr200?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Shesaid, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. Idle

    Idle Been here awhile

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    Before you buy anymore bikes, throw a leg over a DRZ400SM. You should be able to find a used one you can go and sit on. Or a WR250X, the supermoto version of the wr250r. Kawi made one aswell.


    Even with pure street tires they (supermotos) are very capable in the dirt. The lower seat height that the 17" wheels give you is a definite plus. Of course 50/50 tires can be had in 17's and will let you deal with a little mud here and there and still have heaps more traction on pavement than skinny knobbies.



    Oh, I think you should get the DR200 if you are truly only looking at those two.
    #21
  2. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    this information is not accurate, I remembered how these two bikes felt and they were taller than the DR650, so I went to read the info at yamaha and suzuki and they are both taller, well the suzuki dr650 is listed with a 34.8 seat height, the supermoto suzuki list at 35.00 the yamaha is no longer being made but it was taller than the KLR and that lists at 35 also.

    the good thing about the dr650 is that it can be lower easily 1-2? inches

    Damasovi
    #22
  3. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

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    Agree with Gaprunr.

    TW200's will do 60mph all day long and your still not even close to it's engineered "red line". Folks who cpmplain about the fat tires on pavement have apparently not riden one!.....the TW is quite nimble,especially in the twisties!.For your Cali. 70-80 mph roads....I wouldn't use any 250's.....to light of a bike IMO....will get you blown around easily by wind etc..
    BUT, that said,it you are doing the back road deal,either the DR 200 or The TW200 will serve you well.....Good luck. And if you do decide on a TW200 don't let folks fool you,the TW's tires are just as easily purchased as any other bike!.
    #23
  4. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

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    HUH?.......perhaps air the tires correctly.......the TW excels in the twisties!.Another advantage of the TW......you can order a kick-start "kit" from Bay Area Yamaha in Oregon....battery dies,not an issue!.
    The other mentioned 200's / 250's are good machines as well.......just look them all over carefully with consideration on YOUR needs / wants.
    #24
  5. Shesaid

    Shesaid Been here awhile

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    Thanks for all the help, info, and suggestions.

    We chose the DR650's because they were the only bikes in that category that I had any hope of sitting on and still touching the ground. And, with the option of a lower seat height right out of the box on the 2012s, I was able to reasonably put both feet on the ground. Since then I have replaced the seat and dropped another inch and then we added a lowering link. We're thinking we'll adjust the link and lower it a tad bit more. I don't want to get rid of the DR650, I do love it. But I'm definitely not ready for it yet.

    So-- many of the suggestions offered up are either way too high for me, or not even legal in CA. (yay california:rolleyes)

    And street legal is a must.
    #25
  6. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    The DR can certainly be made plenty low for someone with your inseam, as you already surmised, but that doesn't seem to be your issue. The DR is definitely heavy to hold up when it starts going over, regardless of height, especially with less-than-ideal footing. The gearing can be addressed, and you'll learn to work the friction zone of the clutch in a BRC or dirtbike course. (I can't emphasize taking a course enough.) The stock DR suspension is not great though. It can certainly use some aftermarket/swap voodoo to work better. You won't be able to safely take advantage of a decent suspension until skills are developed though.

    A much lighter bike with a lower 1st gear and with enough gearspread and grunt to at least run from one ramp to another on the interstate seems like it would be desirable for your present use. Are the KL250 Super Sherpa and the CRF230L street-legal in CA? If not, you may be able to tag them anyway, if they have more than 7500 miles and are coming in from another state. Many of the other 250s and larger are tall. Some are REALLY tall, and 300lb or more curb weight.
    #26
  7. Shesaid

    Shesaid Been here awhile

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    Thanks all for help/input/opinions and general BSing.

    There are a few suggestions that I'd be interested in (Super Sherpa) if I could have one in CA. :poser(this little guy says "poser" by him, but I think he looks like he's throwing a tantrum.)

    After lots of research, asking around, sitting and jumping on bikes and budgeting... I have it on good authority that there's going to be a 2013 TW in my Easter basket.

    It feels good-- how can it seem SO much smaller than the DR650 when the specs say it's only a few inches different in length/width/height? Gotta be the lower displacement I guess.

    It'll need a little softer suspension to make me feel feel truly comfy with the seat height-- but all the guys who outweigh me by 25-50 pounds and are 6 inches taller than me assure me that I don't need to monkey with anything, just put 100 miles on it. :fpalm So we'll see: the last time I took someone else's "advice" on how to get started with riding, I fell down and lost 2 months of work. So we'll just see. But the TW sure does fit me much better out of the box than the DR did... Not that I'm giving up on the DR! Gonna drop it a little lower and cut my teeth on the smaller/slower bike and work my way back up.
    #27
  8. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    I would go TW or Super sherpa but the XT isnt out of the picture either


    Im bias my super sherpa is happy around the 60 mph mark and reliable enuff to ride it any where . My friend has a TW and he says my sherpa feels less buzzy on the highway .

    Its prefect for a newb putting around checking stuff out
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Yeah the WR250R is a hot rod of the 250 , and the Honda 250 is a good deal and the KLX would be fun but I the sherpa is like a trusty old car ,it might not turn heads but it just feels right to ride.
    #28
  9. greer

    greer Long timer

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    Shesaid,

    It'll be a different world on a smaller bike, so get ready to enjoy life! I'd suggest you spend some time getting used to the notion that you can completely handle this bike rather than the bike handling you. Straddle the bike with your feet on the ground letting the weight tip from side to side a bit so you can get used to the feel of it. Get off the bike and stand beside it and tip it toward you; with your hands on the bars and the seat/tank against your hip you can tip it way over and hold it if you need to. Push it all around the parking lot as if it were an over-size bicycle. Sometimes pushing is easier with left hand on the bars and right hand on the back of the seat or on the grab rail, especially if you need to push backward. I think practicing a few of these things will help you get your confidence back and let you begin to feel you are back in control. These are some things that have helped me over the years. Good luck and keep us posted!

    Sarah
    #29
  10. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

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    My wife has a little TW200 and she really loves it (although she seems to crash it an awful lot). They are extremely tough little bikes.

    The first thing you will likely notice is the super low gearing. The bike will just start rolling when it will be time to shift to second gear. Dropping the rear sprocket from a 50 tooth down to a 45 will make the bike much more street friendly, without hampering the dirt worthiness (unless you ride only mountainous goat trails).

    Good luck!
    #30
  11. Skibikejunkie

    Skibikejunkie Adventurer

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    This.

    My wife and I just took a rider education course. Worth every penny and then some. Once you've done that, you will be a lot more comfortable with the controls and will have a foundation for good habits. First thing they'll have you do is feather the clutch so you can walk your bike in first gear. :clap
    #31
  12. TheMule

    TheMule Been here awhile

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    Did the 2013 TW show up at Easter? If so congrats and enjoy! There's alot more to a motorcycle than just displacement. I've been away from the TW for awhile now but still wish I had one. Every time I see one I smile and get the itch to go further in debt!
    #32
  13. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    That is a bit extreme!
    If you are going fast over rough stuff, its a handfull, and it can hurt you in a fall due to its weight, but lots of people ride much worse in the dirt.
    Lower it, leave the suspension soft and it does very well at moderate speeds.
    The KLR is much worse (heavier), the 650 Honda is way high and the BMW's weigh more I think.

    I think the xt225 and the crf230 are better then the TW200, but the TW200 would be my pick if I had to ride miles of sand, swamp, mud and nasty hills.
    Next up might be a dr350, add lots of street, the dr650 lowered.



    #33
  14. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    I rode since I was a kid, and had several bikes off and on over the years. I already had my M license for quite a while and finally took a BRC around age 34. My riding improved noticeably over the weekend, to both me AND the coaches. It has continued to improve over time as I practice more drills, read more, and started riding different off-pavement terrains.

    The difference in skill and confidence that I saw in the raw beginners in my BRC amazed me. Some had never even operated a clutch before, cage OR moto. Only one person washed out of the range, and everybody else seemed to have an easy time of most of the final skills test...over the short time-frame of a weekend! 'Unreal! I stripped countersteering down to the bare essentials. I can swerve MUCH faster now, with much better precision and control, and I continue to improve as I practice and learn more.
    #34
  15. Shesaid

    Shesaid Been here awhile

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    The Easter bunny did, indeed, deliver a shiny new TW.

    [​IMG]

    I picked it up the day before Easter with .7 miles on the odo. As of this afternoon (mind you, I only get to ride on the weekends just yet) the odometer is boasting 21 miles.

    I've dubbed the new bike the "Tipsy Wombat," having decided to stick with the "TW" theme for a name. It is a wholly different experience from the DR650. The TW is so mucher smaller from the lower stock seat height (My DR has been lowered,) to the grip on the clutch and front brake levers. The controls feel so much more intuitive for me and I can find and reach everything without having to look for it.

    It's true, I won't be getting any speeding tickets on this thing! I had it up to 30 mph today and the Wombat and I were both plenty happy with that... how long does it take before going over 20 stops feeling like you're breaking the sound barrier? LOL.

    But I'm loving the bike and feeling more confident about riding-- although the 14-year-old neice gets on the Fat Cat and smokes me, yelling "GO FASTER!" as she passes me.

    Oh well. I'm having fun and I'll get faster with time.
    #35
  16. tommu56

    tommu56 Long timer

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    Cool

    It will do a little better than the 55 red line on speedometer when you get that far.
    Take your time the first 3 months on a bike are just getting the feel of it!
    #36
  17. greer

    greer Long timer

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    Yahoo!

    Sarah
    #37
  18. TheMule

    TheMule Been here awhile

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    THE most important thing!! Congrats!!
    #38
  19. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Tip:
    The stock front tire is poor at everything.
    Its rough and noisy on the street, and has very little grip in the dirt.
    A real dual sport tire is much nicer.
    #39
  20. billmags

    billmags Scoot Jockey

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    Congrats on the TeeDub! Have fun! It always makes me smile at some point while riding it. :)
    #40