Long term KLX250S review

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by bmwhd, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. Earthscape

    Earthscape Have ya got a helmut?

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    I think I was a bit ambiguous (sorry) - the line will get higher, because you only mark the tank when it's new on the very first fill. As the tank grows, the same amount of gas doesn't fill the container as high. So really the line stays in the same place on the can, it's just that the can starts to hold more, so the gas doesn't make it up to the line (and hence the line appears to get higher).
    Oh how I wish I could find a sign like that near me.
  2. IDRIDR

    IDRIDR Take me to the River

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    We have several around town. For those who are interested... http://pure-gas.org/
  3. Earthscape

    Earthscape Have ya got a helmut?

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    Yeah, I've been there, notice how Massachusetts isn't even listed? That sucks. (And neither is Connecticut or Rhode Island.) Good to spread the word though, the loudest voice is the wallet.
  4. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

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    They have the non-ethanol stuff here in Oregon, but it's EXPENSIVE, and only in 92 octane. Since the KLX runs fine on 87, I stick with that.

    Rob
  5. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    Oddly, I've never had an issue with ethanol added fuel that I was aware of. I live in west Texas, and maybe that helps with moisture, but I think a lot of these issues are with bikes that might occasionally sit up for periods between use. Or maybe it's a regional thing as far as fuel supply goes. Not sure. I've had tons of bike, both street and dirt, since ethanol fuel came out. Many had steel fuel tanks. I never even had corrosion or rust issues in any of them. I hear lots of bad raps on ethanol, so there's bound to be some fire with all that smoke, but I just haven't any noticeable issues with it.
  6. djchan

    djchan Long timer

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    I've had to replace o-rings in every carb I've bought that was produced prior to 2003 or so. They've all puked gas into the crankcase and all over the floor until the get viton o-rings. I've also had to put gas line dryer in any bike that has sat for a time without being used.

    No big deal, but noticeable.

    I checked out that website and there's only one station in my area that offers "pure-gas" and it happens to be right on my way to work, but it's at the Norridwock airport so I can imagine what the price would be, and it's only 91 octane. Guess I'll stick to my corn gas.
  7. Earthscape

    Earthscape Have ya got a helmut?

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    I'd definitely concur that the impact varies regionally. Different refineries across the country use different fuel formulas, different raw ingredients, and tend to feed areas of the country more local to them for obvious reasons. Longer exposure to more air moisture makes it worse. So if your refinery is in a dry area, and you are in a dry area, you may be okay with little impact. If your refinery is in a humid area, and travels to you always in high humidity, then chances are it may be partially 'spoiled' before you even put it into your bike/car/equipment. Most bike tanks are open to atmospheric air, where car tanks are not, so that's an additional difference that we need to deal with.

    On a trip this summer, I was able to fill up with a large tankful of non-ethanol on a non-travel day (not the KLX). The next day when I started the bike to get going again, I could smell the difference in the exhaust - very noticeable.

    All the bikes in my sig except the XT I have owned since new. On the older bikes, I have been able to note what happened to the gas tanks when ethanol was introduced. The tanks never swelled before ethanol. There is a reason why they don't use it in airplanes. I wouldn't mind if it was actually solving some real global energy or atmospheric problem, but the facts are that it is not, so to force me to use it with no option just doesn't sit right with me. I'd gladly pay more for non-ethanol (though with no interference, it should actually be cheaper).
    That said, other than the Acerbis tank and fuel line swelling a bit, and MPG not being what it should, my KLX seems to be okay with it. Though I should add that I typically do use fuel additive such as Star-Tron.

    Depending on someone's age, you may be able to think back to the 80's, 70's, etc. and remember what gasoline used to smell like. It was the smell of power, the smell of freedom. Absolutely nothing like ethanol.
  8. fastdadio

    fastdadio Still gettin faster

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    I remember back when gasoline smelled goood. AHH! that sweet chemical aroma, we learned to associate it with a good time. Now, I don't know, it just dosen't do it for me anymore. Percolated panther piss. :puke1
  9. djchan

    djchan Long timer

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    ya, ethanol smells like unwanted government intrusion.
  10. sealsam

    sealsam Sam...I am.

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    No fuel injection on the '13. I thought Kawy would do it.
  11. rickypanecatyl

    rickypanecatyl SE Asia adventure tours

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    So is the US the only only place with carbuerated KLX's left? (I was going to say the only place that doesn't get FI but thought that might hurt some feelings! :lol3)

    For those that wanted FI I wonder how easy it would be to put on...

    Once we start hearing reports of the FI guys having nailed the mapping with the 351 kit it might look good to me!
  12. griffo1962

    griffo1962 Long timer

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    pretty sure the Oz models are still going to be carb'd
  13. PhoenixGirl63

    PhoenixGirl63 Adventurer

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    Thanks so much, Scrambleon! That would be great. Customizing the seat would probably be required, too.

    RobG, TNC, & SamM:
    I don't actually own this bike, yet... this is research to see if this bike could be customized to fit me. Obviously, being petite puts me at somewhat of a disadvantage in shopping for a dual sport bike. I want something that can get me to the great riding on the slab without taking all day to do it, then able to do the fun, off-roady stuff.

    I just learned to ride in 2011 and I have 6,000+ miles on my little Suzuki TU250X. It's time to move up to another/different bike. I struggle with wanting a bigger bike, but something that is still light enough to handle gravel, dirt, single tracks, etc.

    Decisions, decisions.....
  14. SamM

    SamM Jeep Overlander

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    PhoenixGirl63,
    If you want a great deal, you may want to checkout the Bikes Section of the Classifieds. My KLX250SF is listed there for sale. It's a great bike for the money I am asking. It would be a great deal for you on a near new bike. It has just over 1000 miles on it. Sorry, not really trying to pimp my stuff but...

    I'll give it a bump, so you can find it easier.

    SamM
  15. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    You ain't hurtin' my feelings...I just installed a Mikuni TM36 pumper carb on my '06 KLX, and I love it.:lol3
  16. lobolator

    lobolator Been here awhile

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    Not sure I'd even know how to fix the only problem I've had so far on this bike...clogged jets...if it were FI. The carb is easy, drain it and go(if lucky), or drain it and pull the bottom off to clean and replace. 30minutes on the side of the trail.
    Can that be done with FI? I don't know, you must be able to trail fix it, if you have the knowledge, I do not. Maybe it's easier. But doesn't FI need a fuel pump? Another source of problems?
    I like my troublesome carb. It just works and when it doesn't, I can usually fix it, or limp home to where I can.

    And to Phoenix and other short ridres considering the KLX:
    I'm 5'8" with a 31" inseam and was very uncomfortable on the tall KLX, at first, with just my toes on the ground. I also come from a world of road bikes, where dropping a bike is a big No-No(think Ferrari red Ducati - very expensive paint on top of expensive fiberglass = no dropping). The KLX almost begs you to drop it(once you have barkbusters and a skid plate on there), it's a dirt bike after all. And being able to put your feet down only matters when you run out of momentum, the rest of the time off-road you should be standing on the pegs and squeezing the bike between your legs...and that is exactly when 11" of travel is your best friend.
    I eventually got used to the height on the road(and the bike suspension does settle in after some miles), at stop lights I just shift to one side and flat foot while waiting, and off-road I drop it every so often because I can't get my foot down, oh well. I usually try and stop in a low spot or next to a rock if the ground is uneven.
    Seat Concepts seems like a good fix for the seat height problem, as well as adding comfort for road miles.
    Elsewhere know as MaximusPrime
  17. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

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    Lobolator has a very valid point with regards to seat height. On a dirt-oriented bike, you should be standing when doing most off-road riding. The only time you're gonna wish for a lower seat height is when you come to a stop on rocky or rutted terrain. I have the same issue. It's frustrating, but it doesn't happen that often, and with time and patience and practice, I think it makes you a better rider than the folks with longer legs who can "cheat" and paddle through the tough stuff. We have to actually RIDE it.

    Once off-road, you do most of your steering with the footpegs anyway.. shifting your weight from peg to peg to tilt the bike. At least at higher speeds you do. At low speeds, it's a combination of both. It's something you learn; it seems really intimidating when you're first learning, but it comes with practice.

    So... get it as low as you can, practically, even if it means only one foot down when stopped. You WILL drop it from time to time. As long as you have good handguards, it's not a big deal (to protect the levers). Mine's been dropped more times than I can count and still looks pretty good all things considered. :)

    Rob
  18. djchan

    djchan Long timer

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    Took my 250 out this AM to the worst terrain I ever ride. I know I shouldn't do it alone but nobody else wants to ride this crap - even ATVs. Towards the end of the ride (still in the middle of nowhere, ME but at least I'm off that damn mountain) I come to a an extremely long mud hole - maybe 30-40 yards long. To the right was an alternate route that had been cut by 4-wheelers. It was shorter, but looked deeper than the original trail, so I took the old trail. Didn't take long to find out how deep it was - up to mid thigh with deep muck on the bottom. Went down within 25 feet of my entry point.

    What I later found out was the bottom of this particular hole was a severe W shape in cross section. Extremely deep troughs on each side with a higher center in the middle. At the center - it was only 1 foot deep. At the sides - 2.5 to 3 feet deep. Ugly, muck filled stench. At times I was in the water chest deep.

    Of course I figured out the cross section as I was struggling to drag my 250S (the S is clearly for submarine) to the side of the hole because there was absolutely no way it was moving forward or back to my entry point. The left side of the hole was a horrible tangle of blown-down trash wood, but to the right was a fairly open slot between the 2 mudholes. Unfortunately when I hoisted the bike from the bottom of the hole it slid down into the left V of the W shaped bottom. So, I had to drag the bike sideways to the hump, into the right V of the W and up out of the V and onto fairly dry ground. All I can say is - damn I'm Herculean. Good to do that crap every now and again to assure yourself you're not a decrepit old man afterall.

    Then a 1.5 mile push uphill/coast downhill to a landmark that I recognized. Left the bike there without trying to start it up. NO WAY, NO HOW was I about to bend my valves trying to start that ugly stenchful SOB.

    From there it was another 1.5 miles out to the nearest road where I caught a lift from a pickup going my way back into Farmington. In downtown (and I use that term loosely) Farmington I called a friend who gave me a lift out to my house. Long story short - just like a Harley, she got a ride in the back of the pickup.

    Should have taken the time to clean the muck off but all I could think about was getting that crap out of my crankcase. Put it in the barn and pulled the oil plug.... I was shocked by how much water came out. There was at least as much water as oil in there. And, the water came out 1st. Followed by the chocolate milk oil. In fact, there was so much water I was worried she had blown the head gasket or cracked the head, but a quick check of the radiator showed a full compliment of beautiful green coolant.

    so, she's in the barn, the last few slugs of muddy oil draining out. I've also drained the carb. I plan on heading into town to pick up a couple quarts of cheap sacrifical oil (don't want to waste my good synthetic stuff) to run and drop again. I also plan to pull the plug and let it turn over a few cranks with no compression before trying to start her up. I'll also check the airbox and re-oil the filter.

    Is there anything else I should do before cranking her up?

    I figure if it all goes OK, no harm done. If worse comes to worse - 351 here I come.

    All in all, I learned 3 things today: Don't be a dumbass and ride that kinda stuff alone. People are generally nice and willing to help a dumbass out of a jam, even when he smells like muckhole stench. And, that plucky little KLX will run for a couple seconds even when fully submerged.

    Sorry for the whiny rant.
  19. The Letter J

    The Letter J Riding around the block

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    as long as you weren't full throttle when it stalled, I wouldn't even worry about it. I know the situation all too well :muutt myself and in my experiences, I've always let go of the throttle before going for a swim... the motor at idle as it takes a drink. A quick trailside pull of the sparkplug and partial drain of the oil (as you noted, the water settles to the bottom) and I'd be back in business. The crankcase vent would give off steam for a few minutes burning off residual water (minimal.) The few times that I've had to deal with a sunken bike, we were all on regular dirtbikes and had trucked them to the trailhead so the ride back to the truck was never too far. Once at home it only took 1 oil change to be nice and clean again. Being that you never started it after the submersion (with water/gunk in your oil/etc.) you should have avoided all of the potential after effects that I may have subjected my old scoots to. :clap
  20. Jon_PDX

    Jon_PDX Long timer

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    PhoenixGirl63,

    A few years ago I had a Kawasaki Sherpa 250. It a slightly shorter KLX250 and air cooled. It does not have the suspension of the KLX but it was still a fun bike and even handled rough single track stuff better than I thought it would. The only issue I had with it was one time when I was climbing a long dirt hill at high speed it did get pretty hot and started to lose power.

    I'm not sure if that would be of interest to you but I did not see it mentioned so I thought I would suggest it as something to look at if you had not already considered it.

    Jon...