Long term KLX250S review

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by bmwhd, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. Pauls2ndblessing

    Pauls2ndblessing Adventurer

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    It was a bit nerve racking but as long as you take your time, anyone can do it. Its much cheaper than going to a dealership even if you have to buy the tools. Thanks for commenting!
  2. ZIGGYND

    ZIGGYND Been here awhile

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    Finally got around to checking out how the 250 tank fits on the 140. I think the picture below says it all. Unfortunately it will not fit without a lot of persuasion (cutting torch, welder, 5 lb hammer, etc.). Although it appears that angles are similar between the two, that is about the only thing that is remotely close. The 140's frame where the tank sits is shorter and narrower preventing the larger tank from seating any closer than in the picture. The mounting locations between the 2 are reversed (250 screw is on lower end of tank, 140 is on top end of tank). Even with the tank sitting on top of the triples the rear part protrudes past where the 140 tank attaches pushing the seat (which isn't a direct fit to the tank) back too far to be attached at the rear mounting location.
    IMO it might be easier to mold a new tank from scratch than to start with the existing klx250 tank. It would have been nice to find a new home for all of those stock tanks sitting in peoples garages, but I guess we'll have to keep looking.


    [​IMG]
  3. Jon_PDX

    Jon_PDX Long timer

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    Well like they say.... "A picture is worth a 1,000 words".

    I agree with you assessment, thanks for taking the time to check it out.

    Jon...
  4. dirtydeeds

    dirtydeeds I'm alive.

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    +1
    Thanks for taking the time.
  5. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

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    I'm getting close to ordering a set of valves for my KLX forks... anybody know if there's a difference between the Racetech Gold Valves and the ones from Moto Pro? Price difference is negligible.

    Also.. anybody know what the install is like? On my DR650, you have to disassemble the forks and drill holes into the damper rods. Is anything similar required for the KLX?

    Rob
  6. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

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    I have no idea what's involved with installing the gold valves in the KLX, but it's a completely different product than the gold valve emulators for your DR. I had the gold valves in my KLX and they work great. Be sure to get the proper springs for your weight to get the most performance out of your forks.
  7. Dan888

    Dan888 Been here awhile

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    Rob there are a couple good write ups over on KF http://www.kawasakiforums.com/forum/klx-250s-71/ . I know TNC did a very thorough write up on the gold valve install. Someone else followed shortly after and posted a lot of good info when they did theirs. Hop over there and do a search.
    Dan

    ADV is a great forum, but you guys are missing a lot of info if you don't check in over on KF
  8. djchan

    djchan Long timer

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    Rob - on the KLX it's as simple as removing the base valve from the bottom of the fork. It can be done without disassembly of the entire fork.

    The only special tool required is a 14mm hex drive to remove the base valve. I could actually leave the KX forks on my KDX 220 - turn it over on it's seat and handlebars (like a bicycle) and remove the base valves with the forks still on.

    The goldvalve (or motopro) kit comes with all the shims you'll need plus the new valve itself. I can't remember if it includes a checkplate arrangement for a midvalve or not.

    I've read somewhere that the Moto-Pro Ultra-Max kit is freer flowing even than the Racetech kit. The good thing with the Moto-Pro kit is that John (the owner) knows as much or more about the KLX suspension as anyone going.

    Either one will make the forks much more plush on the small stuff.
  9. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    I went with the Race Tech Gold Valve in my '06 KLX fork, but I would have no concern in using John's Moto Pro valving either. They both accomplish the same thing. The stock fork valving sucks when you try to ride real off road with it. There are several good writeups over on the Kawasaki Forum as Dan888 indicated on how to do the job. In addition to the 14mm allen socket for removal of the fork footnut as djchan suggested, you "might" have to have a damper rod holding tool to stick down in the inside of the fork while you remove that footnut. It seems the factory sometimes has an overabundance of threadlocker on some of these footnuts that even using a good air impact wrench won't spin out. I made a holding tool out of an aluminum bicycle seatpost by cutting/grinding 4-prongs into one end, and it probably worked every bit as good as the factory one.

    Here's an option for some home mechanics who might be hesitant to disassemble and work on the damper rod assembly once it's out of the fork. If you feel comfortable in opening up the fork to the point of having the two damper rod assemblies in your hands, they can be sent to John at Moto Pro to be revalved for your needs. It would save some labor and shipping costs due to size and weight of the d-rods vs. the whole fork. I think nearly every home mechanic rider should be able to break down their fork so that they can change oil and fork seals which is inevitable at some point. You should only have to crack open the d-rods once for a revalve. While none of it is rocket science, some people look at that d-rod assembly and are intimidated. Just a thought.
  10. Lonerrider

    Lonerrider Adventurer

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    The KLX forks are an older design, there's no midvalve to worry about. I would go ahead and tear the entire fork apart to replace bushings and seals at the same time, might as well start out with forks that are freshened up so that you can feel the true effects of your new valve/ shim stack.

    Have fun, take your time, it'll all go back together just fine. If you don't have a seal driver, buy the Tusk (http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p.../Tusk-Adjustable-Fork-Seal-Driver/seal+driver) version, nice an cheap and makes the assembly a lot easier.
  11. RockabillySlapMatt

    RockabillySlapMatt Daily Commuter

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    I have a klx250sf with 9k miles that I have owned for a couple months now, did the dynojet kit, and the manuel tensioner, I was riding around practicing when I noticed that when I shifted up at the very last second of clutch engagement my bike made a crunch noise, I slowed down in first gear to about 5 mph and gassed it and it sounded horrible!!! I though it may be my tensioner needed to be readjusted. Long story short I let the bike get cold and readjusted and rode it around and the symptoms went away.

    Has anyone had this issue? Could it be the tensioner was too tight or too lose? Could the bikes oil have gotten too hot just putting around in the parking lot causing the fluid to become to water like thus creating the gear crunching noises? Thanks
  12. Pauls2ndblessing

    Pauls2ndblessing Adventurer

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    I do know the tensioner can be to tight or too loose. Mark's instructions are to make sure it's not over tightened, there should be a little valve chatter on cold start that should go away once the bike warms. He says it's better to be a 1/8 turn to loose than to tight.

    For more info check this thread over at KF: http://www.kawasakiforums.com/forum/klx-250s-71/krieger-cam-chain-adjuster-installed-36477/

    cheers :)
  13. RockabillySlapMatt

    RockabillySlapMatt Daily Commuter

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    Yeah I know, I did that, I just rode with a passenger also that day, I figured the bolt may have worked itself loose or tight or whatever, I did readjust to little clatter when cold, just didn't know if my grinding noise could be another issue. Thank you :)
  14. IDRIDR

    IDRIDR Take me to the River

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    Did this grinding happen ONLY when your passenger was on? If so, your chain may be rubbing along the upper roller. Happens to me also, especially before re-springing when going over bumps, throtteling hard, etc.
  15. RockabillySlapMatt

    RockabillySlapMatt Daily Commuter

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    No even without the passanger now, and it's only between 1st and 2nd gear. I get to the shift point, pull in clutch, up shift, give some gas and let out clutch, at the very last minute instance of clutch engagement it grinds.
  16. cjbiker

    cjbiker Nobody's Robot

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    How worn are your chain and sprockets? It could be the chain skipping.
  17. RockabillySlapMatt

    RockabillySlapMatt Daily Commuter

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    Not worn, recently replaced. Now I'm having another weird issue. I replaced cam chain tensioner, and I know the sound of the rattle when its cold, but today it sounded more like a loose tappet, I don't think the previous owner did the valves at 7500, bikes at 9065, probably best to do that. I will post the results if that helped at all.
  18. Zecatfish

    Zecatfish XTique Rider

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    The oldest boy is wanting to replace his totaled DT125.
    He found a KLX250 with 1k miles on it for $3500, thinks the year is 2010.
    He is graduating this year and wants to take a trip this summer too.
    He wants to go riding, visit the Grand Canyon, its a 1500 mile ride from here.
    So I know it needs a larger tank.
    Next can it run 65 mph without killing it?
    I know there is better choices but the used option are next to none around here.
    Since this thread is 500 pages long is there any serious issues we need to know of?
    Would you trust it like a Yamaha WR250 for such a trip?
    I did try to read through the first 15 or so pages and could not find any real information on these questions......
  19. Lutz

    Lutz Fuzzy Rabbit

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    1500 miles is nothing, 65mph is easy, and neither will hurt the bike; however, you'll want roughly stock gearing to save from revving too high on the freeway, which will wear out the engine sooner. I've got over 12,000 miles on my '09, most of which are commuting in the 55-70 mph range with 14/42 gearing.

    I wouldn't hesitate to take such a trip based on the reliability of the KLX...hell, I put on 1500 miles in less than 3 weeks of just commuting (minimum of 105 miles a day). Comfort is another issue, but that is highly subjective.

    You're right about the tank, the best I ever got with the stock tank was 116 miles to bone dry. With the 3.7 gallon Acerbis, I've been as far as 180 miles with some fuel left in the tank. The Acerbis is not a direct bolt on for the '09-up bikes, but it fits with some minor tweaks. IMS makes a direct fit 3.2 gallon tank.

    The only thing I'm aware of on these bikes that commonly causes unexpected breakdowns is broken shift stars in the '09, '10, and maybe '11 models. The '09, at least some '10, and maybe some '11 bikes came with a shift star that breaks easily. There's a sticky thread about it over a kawasakiforums.com. It's about $25 or $30 in parts to repair if it happens, the replacement part doesn't break, and should be done before it breaks in my opinion. There is a risk of the piece that breaks off getting into the transmission and causing greater damage, and though it's not a fairly easy repair, you wouldn't want to tackle it during a trip. It's worth verifying that it hasn't already been done before buying the parts though - that has bitten some people.
  20. Zecatfish

    Zecatfish XTique Rider

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    Well a little more.
    Its an 09 model. though I don't think KAwasaki changed it much.
    Got the price down some too.
    Thanks for the reply.
    Anyone else have good/bad to tell?