long trips on small scooters

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by JerryH, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. Underboning

    Underboning Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
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    728
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    Back in PDX again!
    Google Maps to the rescue! Chandler to Yuma with no Interstate, and 3 routes to choose from. Of course, it adds 95 miles (at least) to the trip! http://goo.gl/maps/8RcnF

    One route even goes through Mexico! :eek1
    #81
  2. driller

    driller Twist and Go

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    In The Isothermal Belt, NC
    Thanks, UB. Methinks "paralysis by analysis" was setting in here.:dhorse
    #82
  3. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    Chandler, AZ
    Yes, thanks indeed. I think I am beginning to get the hang of this. I have never done it before. Most of my miles up until recently were on freeways.
    #83
  4. conchscooter

    conchscooter Long timer

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    Florida Keys
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=251907#

    My main claim to scooter touring experience. Please note in 1981 there was a national 55 mph speed limit so a P200 could keep up more or less, though freeways weren't much fun. I have ambitions to repeat the trip or something similar but this was my first motorcycle tour where I went light and planned very little.
    My advice remains to travel light, enjoy riding and talk about it after you've done it, not before. Don't over think and ride more.
    Cheers.
    #84
  5. ScooterDogMom

    ScooterDogMom Adventurer

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    Clermont County, Ohio
    Awesome story! What direction is your riding going to take now?
    #85
  6. JerryH

    JerryH Banned

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    I still believe long distance touring on a modern small scooter is possible. They seem to have one major weak point, and that is the belt. Choose a quality scooter with a belt that can be fairly easily replaced beside the road, and the tools to do it with. Everything else should be almost completely reliable. There is nothing quite like that sinking feeling when you are cruising along in the middle of nowhere, and the engine starts to rev as the scooter slows down. Kind of like a flat tire when you have nothing to fix it with.
    #86