Lowering an 800gs

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by rubRsidedown, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. rubRsidedown

    rubRsidedown Long timer

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    We are THINKING about my Wife's next bike, not sure as to when this will happen but it will at some point within the next year or three.

    She really likes the 800gs but would need it lowered a bit.
    Anyone on here have much exper. with lowering one?

    Looking for links, ease of install, $$$ to swap out etc...

    She rides an 06 650gs right now and does VERY well on it but I'm thinking she would certainly like the power increase over her 650 at some point in the near future. :evil

    She likes the Triumph 800 as well.
    What are the big differences between the BMW and the triple Triumph?
    #1
  2. GH41

    GH41 Been here awhile

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    It looks like the 2013 F800 has a low suspention option. The new F700 has a few more HP and a dual disk front end. In my opinion the only thing the 800 offers over the 650 is a longer travel suspention. When you lower it you are giving that up. GH
    #2
  3. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day.

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    My wife follows my f8 anywhere on her f658, so why not get one of those?
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  4. rubRsidedown

    rubRsidedown Long timer

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    Good point... (what's a 658 though) :huh

    My Wife follows my 950 ADV very well. :evil
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  5. NoMoIke

    NoMoIke Adventurer

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    A 658 is a F800GS engine with a slightly cooler cam and slightly less suspension. Also has cast, tubeless wheels instead of spokes/tubes. It was branded by BMW as the F650GS after 2008 and for 2013 it is branded the F700GS.
    #5
  6. FredRydr

    FredRydr Danger: Keep Back 500 Ft.

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    For 2013, both models offer low versions from the factory. Check it out.

    Fred
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  7. rubRsidedown

    rubRsidedown Long timer

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    Oh OKa, thanks

    My Wife has an 06 single cyl twin spark Rotax.
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  8. icebox

    icebox Long timer

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    Gf just moved from a 02 F650GS single to a new F650 GS twin. She actually kept the older GS for a round town bike, just because it handles so well in parking lots etc. But on the highway there is no comparison the "658" is a better bike in every way, more power, MUCH better wind managment and a choice of windscreens that work, handles better with a bigger bike feel without much weight difference. More comfortable on her knees, peg to seat distance is better and just more comfortable. Seems to handle dirt and gravel about the same as the old bike. Oddly fuel mileage is almost identical, just working less I suppose. Keeps up with my R12 GS quite well, if my right knee gets much worse it might be my next bike. Go ride one!
    #8
  9. rubRsidedown

    rubRsidedown Long timer

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    What do you find for fuel mileage?
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  10. NoMoIke

    NoMoIke Adventurer

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    I can do 60+ if I take it easy...and I'm a great big fat person. If I push it, it'll go below 50mpg.
    #10
  11. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    The biggest difference is the engine. It is tuned the same as the 800XC. It other words it makes more HP than the BMW and still has a flat torque curve. Not as much as BMW, but enough to never know the difference.

    The new renamed F700gs has bumped HP and Torque, so I would wait. They also lowered the gearing a tooth so the difference should be noticeable. A now 10 hp difference with the 800. They also have tubeless tires which is a plus for some. If you plan to lower that bike anyway, save some money.

    The Triuph is heavier but has a lower center of gravity and street bike frame geomatry so it feels lighter than it is. A few report quicker steering and that seems logical. Smoother, because a triple naturally offsets some of the vibrations. Enough electrical output to light up your house for all the gadgets we like to add.

    Owners love them so much, they are not quick to point out any problems. So I would test ride both of them.
    #11
  12. Schai

    Schai Adventurer

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    I recently bought a used F800GS that I added Hyperpro progressive lowering springs to drop the height 50mm. This brings it to the same seat height as the F650GS twin or the newly announced F700GS. Note that Hyperpro's setup is quite a bit off, primarily in the amount of fork oil, and I am fixing that right now.

    However, unless you plan to ride hard a lot in rough country, I'd recommend starting with the lower bikes.

    That's what I should have told myself and listened.
    #12
  13. kmroxo

    kmroxo Reno Rider

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    I am debating getting a second, smaller, GS. An 800 with a low seat works fine for me, but so does a twin 650. My problem is that I have become a suspension snob after putting Öhlins on my 1150 Adventure so I plan to replace any stock suspension on a bike I get anyway. So then it comes down to a bit more power with the 800 and bigger front wheel versus tubeless tires on the twin 650.

    I must say that I can't seem to fine any used twin 650s for sale on this site. Not sure if that is because most people here run the 800 or because they don't want to part with them ...
    #13
  14. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    Too be honest, if you have more than a dirt road in mind, you need to replace the suspension. it is not that good. The f800 has cartridge valves crimped in place. It is expensive to fix. The rear has no linkage with non rebuildable shocks.

    The F700gs has old style damping rod fork suspension, but cheaper to deal with, but not as much travel.

    The problem with both bikes is the rear shock mount. The bolt span is 2.5 inches for a shock mount that measures 1.5 inches wide. The difference is made up with a 1 inch spacer. If you bottom the shock, the bolt bends.

    At least the parts are made of steel and get their strength from the tension of the bolt. All the aftermarket shocks have 2 aluminum spacers and a bearing. Bottom those and the bolt can't hold all the parts together
    and it bends easier.

    Since I have rebuilt both the front and rear suspension on my F800gs anyway, today I would buy the F700gs and rebuild that with the savings.

    10hp does not mean that much to me.
    #14