lubing trans spline and leaking neutral switch

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by LandLeftBehind, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. craydds

    craydds Long timer

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    LLB, there are some pics of driveshaft installation in post #140 here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=848159&page=10 ; you may need to move your swingarm backwards to have room to remove the trans - there are a some pics of swingarm install in post #118, same thread. just do the removal in reverse steps.
    1. loosen and remove the clamps on the swingarm boot, pull back the boot off of the trans.
    2. lock the rear brake and remove 1 driveshaft bolt; unlock brake, rotate rear wheel to next bolt, lock brake and repeat.
    3. bolts are all out. you can re-use the bolts if they do NOT have lock washers. the new, short bolts do NOT use locks and can be used again. the old bolts with locks have to be replaced.
    4. now remove the swingarm locknuts and bolts so you can pull the swingarm backwards.
    5. take that transmission OFF.
    #21
  2. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Yes the drive shaft rubber boot pulls back and the four 10mm bolts are undone. I use the tool kit box end wrench but another 12 point box end wrench will fit, most of the time. There is a limited amount of space to get the wrench in but you probably have one that will fit.

    Be careful with the skinny clamps on the boot. There are available at the dealers as I remember but I thought they weren't exactly cheap.
    #22
  3. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin!

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    Is it interchangeable? ..... same thread length? 'cuz the brass one is listed for pre-'76 (i.e. Slash 5's and early Slash 6's)....

    I hope that the "new" aluminum one that I just put in (MAX BMW part) isn't crapola.......:eek1

    [​IMG]


    :D
    #23
  4. Mugwest

    Mugwest .

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    My question as well. I somehow missed that there was now a brass aftermarket N switch :norton
    #24
  5. sigpe57

    sigpe57 Been here awhile

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    Put the Crasftsman crowbar here and push down the crowbar. You will be able to push the aluminum tube up and out.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #25
  6. LandLeftBehind

    LandLeftBehind Been here awhile

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    Great, that sounds simple enough. I dont have to mess with the suspension do I? Im hoping it will not get in the way of removing the trans while simulteously keeping the rear wheel supported...
    #26
  7. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    LLB,

    I discovered several years ago that sometimes short cuts are just not what we think they are. I tried to remove the rear end of the bike by taking it all off as one piece. It was cumbersome and hard to handle. When It came time to put everything back together it was rather impossible to handle it. So I still had to take it all apart.

    Now when I take the trans out any time, I take the rear wheel off and the sub frame and shocks come off. Oh, I have bags so the racks come off. I take the final drive off and I take the swing arm off. I take each and every one of these parts off the bike as an individual piece. And then I put them all back the same way. I know this goes contrary to anybody that thinks shortcuts work but for me it is faster this way.

    Good luck.
    #27
  8. ME 109

    ME 109 Long timer

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    There is a difference between a short cut, and the quickest way to do a job.
    I can have my tranny on the floor in about 45 minutes. It must take you a long time disston?
    #28
  9. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    there are two different types of brass replacement switches, early and late.

    The OEM- I've been through three and they have all leaked in less than a year. The bras replacement has been in there of 1.5 to 2 years and is dry as a bone.
    #29
  10. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I think I used to be faster but I am working outside and on the ground. I can have the trannie out in not more than an hour I'm sure. If I was trying to hurry, much less.

    I don't think most shortcuts are a savings of time or energy. Leaving the final drive attached to the swing arm makes the whole thing cumbersome and difficult to handle. And all for the sake of removing four nuts.
    #30
  11. Kai Ju

    Kai Ju Long timer

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    Here is my method:

    Once you have disconnected the flange bolts, clutch cable, throw out mechanism and airbox, brake pedal and brake rod.....

    Thread a tiedown through the rear wheel over the rear fender between the seat and the tail light. Remove the swingarm pivot bolts, and pull back on the wheel. Leave the shocks hooked up. As you pull the wheel back the swing arm will slide out between the two frame crossmembers. Tighten the tie down to secure the assembly in place. I usually slide a piece of wood between the tire and the ground to give the whole mess a bit more support.
    When you put it back together connect the drive shaft first and finger tighten the four flange bolts, loosen the tie down and allow the swingarm to swing forward. You may have to jiggle the wheel a bit to engage the splines at the pinion shaft.
    Put everything back together and torque the four flange bolts by holding the rear brake.
    It's a lot easier to thread the bolts in while the swingarm us pulled back.
    #31
  12. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    With all the stuff you've gotta remove, Disston, I'd think you'd move the engine forward instead. I've heard of removing both engine bolts or just the rear one (the method I used). The two different methods each require special tools - removing swingarm axles or exh nuts.

    It's nice not having to remove the swingarm axles since that requires a bit of cleaning to ensure crud and grime doesn't get forced into the bearings upon re-assembly.

    Keep looking at those pix LLB - eventually you'll get it looking as good again... one little step at a time! :wink:

    It still runs as good, and that's the important thing. Every time you throw a leg over you'll be reminded of the great 2012 adventure!
    #32
  13. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I don't think there is a disagreement here. There are just different variations on doing the same thing. Probably a good idea to give somebody who has not done this before a couple of options and he will figure out what way he wants to do it.
    #33
  14. Kai Ju

    Kai Ju Long timer

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    I agree, it's just once again proof that there is more than one way to skin a cat.

    My method was taught to me by a long time BMW mechanic when I first started out at the dealership I worked at for five years. Can't take credit for coming up with that one on my own.
    #34
  15. craydds

    craydds Long timer

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    +1. Well put, clear instructions. KJ, that is the way I do it, too. LLB, if you really wanted a huge amount of room, you could do it disston's way - nothing wrong with that, it is not hard, just time consuming.
    #35
  16. LandLeftBehind

    LandLeftBehind Been here awhile

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    Fantastic. With all of this information I feel confident taking this job on. Ill be sure to let you guys know how it all goes and if anything interesting happens.

    Probably talk to some of you more down the road when I tackle my front end problems....
    #36
  17. LandLeftBehind

    LandLeftBehind Been here awhile

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    The going is good but slow. Still waiting on some supplies to come in. In the meanwhile I wanted to consult you gentlemen on a few matters.

    A.) Any good cleaners to use on a really grungy trans? In addition to trans oil and grime, there are some tough deposits where the airbox sits. Simple green doesnt quite do it. Im concerned that something like brake cleaner might get into the trans housing.

    B.)Approximately how much torque should I apply while installing the neutral switch?

    C.) I want to replace the gearshift lever oil seal. My understanding is one simply has to remove the allen bolt that the lever pivots on, pull off the lever, and replace the seal. I am very nervous about doing this because everything wants to move and Im afraid of breaking the gearshift mechanism. Should I just go for it?
    #37
  18. LandLeftBehind

    LandLeftBehind Been here awhile

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    Also, I appear to be missing the special washers for the rear wheel bolts that Clymer says are necessary. I have no idea why they are missing. Should I pick up a set of these?
    #38
  19. disston

    disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    So it finally happens. Three pages into a thread an the year model of the bike becomes an issue. It always is an issue but it's never in the first post. It is most of the time not on the OP's info page but this time it is. This bike is your 1991 R100RT?
    #39
  20. LandLeftBehind

    LandLeftBehind Been here awhile

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    yes
    #40