Luxury items vs weight & space

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by BluegrassPicker, May 13, 2016.

  1. BluegrassPicker

    BluegrassPicker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    484
    Location:
    Rochester, MN
    What items do you take with you even though they take up too much weight and space ?

    For me it's my Kermit Chair and MSR Flex 3 Cookset..... :fpalm
    #1
  2. ZiaThunder

    ZiaThunder Go big or go home

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,673
    Location:
    NM
    :ear

    I'd love to hear more on this... It's something I'm trying to work through now, while packing for my up coming trip.
    #2
  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,400
    Location:
    below the sea
    You take what you feel you need. Leave everything else behind. Some people need lots of stuff, others are
    mi nim al is tic.
    My partner swears all she takes "packs down to nothing" All crammed together, her bag has the heft of a black hole.

    My thing is a Bialetti moka coffee pot. Works a treat on my gas fired trangia.
    I camp only in the south of France nowadays, usually for a bunch of weeks at a time. I could ride to a village with a cafe, tabac or bar etc, but sometimes I just like laying there in the morning cool, and having a coffee available makes that a nice experience. Looking out from the ridge top across the Calavon valley to the Black Mountains beyond.
    Decent crossiant too, if I remembered the day before. They do need warming though, but the trangia does that too.
    #3
  4. lalispeed

    lalispeed Right handle addict...

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Oddometer:
    112
    Location:
    dfw
    Paraguayan hammock
    #4
  5. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,745
    Location:
    denver
    Hi

    I dual sport on a KTM 530exc. ..go light...go fast.

    My luxury items

    1....long Vs regular sleeping bag

    2.....25" inch wide mat Vs 20" sleeping pad

    3...roll-a-chair

    That's it for me

    Have fun

    Scott
    #5
    juno likes this.
  6. BluegrassPicker

    BluegrassPicker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    484
    Location:
    Rochester, MN
    Oh yeah... My eno hammock too...
    #6
  7. cal08

    cal08 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    441
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    So nice! Good coffee truly is the best companion.
    #7
    nickguzzi likes this.
  8. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,400
    Location:
    below the sea
    Actually, being English, I would rather drink proper tea - with fresh milk. But carrying a fridge to keep the milk from going off seems a bit too far over the top, but probably Home Depot sell a small one?
    If I'm going to drink coffee, then it had better be worth it!

    I also take a string hammock - it rolls up into the size of a base ball - not a space or weight problem at all. It usually needs extra rope for slinging though.
    #8
  9. david61

    david61 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Western Australia
    I'm one of those always chasing the lightest possible way, cuben fibre this, titanium that and so on.

    But a little Sony SW radio is always packed, when you're in the middle of nowhere you can always search around the dial and listen to some weird shit from somewhere on the planet. Endless amusement.
    #9
    tjzondrz, CR500 and cal08 like this.
  10. cal08

    cal08 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    441
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    My luxury stuff: iPod with those tiny speaker units. My eldest kid put together a suburb mix for me of folk, blues and ambient groove. 1800 songs, which I just hit shuffle. I've been listening to it for a decade and it just never gets old. I'd always hoped we would ride together, but it just never took with him, so this is my close second replacement. I Also always bring along a cigar or two. After reading about the coffe tho, I think I will work on putting something together. Mountains, lakes, a good smoke and a strong black espresso, with some blues quiet in the back ground.
    #10
    ACR likes this.
  11. Nickhob

    Nickhob Armchair adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,418
    Location:
    Nyon, Switzerland
    #11
  12. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,400
    Location:
    below the sea
    I have a "nylon" hammock too, but find it very sweaty and uncomfortable. The one I actually use is made like a Commando string vest. I got it, like lots of my stuff at Globetrotter.de in Frankfurt. Light, comfortable and airy - if slightly on the narrow size for my size wide arse.
    #12
  13. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    13,133
    Location:
    Canada's ocean playground
    Nothing, everything has a use and it all easily fits inside three cases. My next purchase is some light weight camping shoes, that'll pack a little better than your average running shoe.

    #13
  14. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,400
    Location:
    below the sea
    Ah! The vexed question of foot ware. Obviously its a very personal thing, no one can tell you what is going to work for you, only trying and learning from your experiences.

    I now take some chacco sandals. The heavy cleated ones. After getting pissed off at the lack of durability of both the soles and straps of most other makes I tried, the chacco ones have lasted and lasted. Of equal importance is they are very comfortable for lots of walking - getting up there towards walking boots when used on rocky terrain or sharp gravel, of which there is a lot on the paths and in the villages of the south of France.

    The sandal thing is rather important to me because I have hot feet. Even in winter, I can't wear anything more than thin cotton socks before my feet get all sweaty. My toes have to be out there, Man.
    #14
    juno likes this.
  15. mach1mustang351

    mach1mustang351 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 12, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,615
    Location:
    Alaska
    I take a king size pillow when camping. I like to be comfortable at bed time.
    #15
  16. BluegrassPicker

    BluegrassPicker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    484
    Location:
    Rochester, MN
    I have a 7.5 pound tent that I Really like ( Sierra Designs Meteor light CD), but think I could save several pounds by switching.
    #16
  17. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,646
    Location:
    SW PA.
    The longer I do this, the less I take. I have found that there is no real need for any cooking gear or camp chair.

    Prefer hammock if nite temps are in 60's. If you use an underquilt, the weight n bulk are too much.

    1 person ul backpacking tent, pad, and a waterproof bag for gear outside your tent are adequate and better if your not sure if a hang is not possible.

    I have a hooped bivy bag that is nice if you sure it's not going to rain or know you can get under something. Otherwise leave it home.
    #17
  18. BluegrassPicker

    BluegrassPicker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    484
    Location:
    Rochester, MN

    NO COFFEE? :confused
    #18
  19. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,646
    Location:
    SW PA.
    I prefer coffee first thing, but can rough it and usually get some w/breakfast at a diner in route.

    When on a trip I'll eat before I find camp. If I feel I get hungry later that evening, I'll have something that requires no cooking like a sandwich or cliff bar.
    #19
  20. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad World's Foremost Authority

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,675
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    Having spent most of my life backpacking and camping out of 4x4s, at 63years old, I have little desire to "rough it" for any length of time. Why not be comfortable? That being said, having a sidecar to carry all of your comfort items sure helps!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Big thick sleeping pads are in the black trash bag, Kermit chairs under that. Right pannier is food/kitchen (on top is a small cooler). Left pannier is mechanical (tools etc.). We both have a yellow dry bag for clothes, One black dry bag is sleeping bags, the other is tent, tarp, & ground cloth. In the trunk of the side car is water, winch and clothing layers. This set up has worked well for 3 weeks of CDR and 3 weeks of HOW.

    So yeah why not be comfortable?
    #20
    tjzondrz, MTBRALPH and Unstable Rider like this.