Luxurylite Backpacking Cot observations and Review..

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by klm4755, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. RangerShawn

    RangerShawn Philosopher

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    #81
  2. tvolk

    tvolk Been here awhile

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    There are now different models of the Luxury Lite cot available.

    The one that has been bought and used by thousands to motorcyclists is the original (not the mesh).

    Nothing wrong with the mesh--but the original is smaller, lighter, and has been the preferred cot--even though it costs more.

    Information on the original one:

    http://www.racerpartswholesale.com/product/UltraLiteCot/Cot_and_Accessories2



    Tom Volk

    Let me know if we can help with any questions on this!

    Full disclosure:
    I own RPW Motorcycle Accessories
    We have sold well over 1000 of the original Ultralite/LuxuryLite cots and only had 2 or 3 returned.
    #82
  3. cdogg44

    cdogg44 Been here awhile

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    I'm bringing this thread back from the grave to ask if these Luxurylite cots are still the hotness for sleeping away from home.

    Having had serious neck surgery in the past, the biggest contributing factor to an enjoyable day is a solid 6-7 hours of comfortable sleep at night.

    Per the ADV crowd I bought an Exped Synmat 9 last fall for camping and was pleased. I definitely slept warm and was comfortable, but I would like to compare it to a cot. I am 6'2", so the 74" length of the Luxurylite has me concerned. Are you taller guys making due?

    I'm looking at the newer mesh version. I think the increased width would be welcome to me. Do I need to plan on using this in combination with the Exped, or is that going to be too thick? Is the cot meant to be slept on with just a sleeping bag or is a ccf pad or thinner Thermarest needed? What temperature would you need a pad?

    Is a cot going to be $240 better than an Exped 9 on a multi night trip if comfortable sleep is priced at a premium?

    Lastly, I've looked everywhere, but does anyone see any on sale right now?
    #83
  4. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    I tried the luxury lite for 6 months and was underwhelmed. For me, it's no good on its own, and only marginally increases the comfort of an air mattress. For me it was much too narrow, my elbows would invariably end up resting on the support bars and go numb.

    I've upgraded the hotness to a camping a hammock. Never have I slept so soundly while in the back country. If you regularly camp in areas where there are trees 12-20' apart, check out this link...


    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=631074

    ...and if you're interested head to this forum.

    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/index.php

    YMMV..
    #84
  5. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    I'll say it again, I sleep as well on mine as I do in my bed at home.

    I use mine in combination with a partially inflated Therm-A-Rest and a Sea-to-Summit travel pillow.

    I bought it for a single trip in 2007 and 6 years later, it's still going strong. Well worth the money.
    #85
  6. Schleprock

    Schleprock Let's Do This!

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    Boon,
    Would you like to sell your cot?
    #86
  7. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    Long gone, hammock camping is like starting over as far as camping goes. A decent hammock, underquilt and tarp will set you back about the same as a high end tent. $200-$300.


    What's awesome is with my hammock, I set it up in the back yard and take naps in it. I hung two hooks in my living room and will lay in it to watch TV. I was originally stoked because I thought hammocking would give me more time to read (cause I'd be away from the computer..). Wrong. I'm usually out cold within 10 minutes. When I first started hammocking it took forever to get it dialed in. I'd set it up, lay down, doze off, wake up 30 minutes later tweak something, lay down, doze off, wake up 30 minutes later, tweak something etc. :lol3 I'll toss my hammock in my tank bag and take it with me for an afternoon ride. Find two trees 12-20 feet apart and I can be napping in 2 minutes or less. :deal

    The cot just wasn't for me. I don't doubt for some folks it's perfect. I didn't like setting it up, or wedging it in my tent or putting it under my tent, or breaking it down, or laying on it. It wasn't for lack of trying. I used it for at least 60 nights worth of sleep (slept a bunch on the floor next to my son's bed when we were punting him out of our bed). I tried a regular thermarest, z-rest, thermarest "trekker" on top of it. I tried fully inflated, half inflated, almost deflated. I tried it with all three mattresses stacked on top. I tried it all by itself. One of the issues not using a matress is that the cot affords zero insulation underneath you. So if the temps are below 70 degress even with a sleeping bag (cause you compress the insulation against the cot) you'll get cold. (it's actually the same problem with hammocks) Again, for me I always ended up with my elbows on the support bars which would make my elbows, forarms and hands fall asleep. Woke up once and everything was so numb I couldn't un-zip my sleeping bag. :eek1

    IMHO one size does not fit all. It may work fine for some folks, but in my opinion, it's not the final word in comfort


    Here's a question, do any of you guys ever just get the urge to set up your tent, cot and thermarest in the backyard and take a nap? I get the urge almost daily to do it with my hammock.:deal


    anyways, sorry to hijack the thread, I'll post no more about hammocks.
    #87
  8. mwood7800

    mwood7800 Banned

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    I tried my buddy's. not for me. I use a Agnes bag and pad. Way more comfortable without the cot. Just don't understand the hype so I had to try it. If someone gave me one I would toss it.
    #88
  9. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    The trouble with hammocks is you have to have a couple of trees close together.

    I've camped in many places where a hammock would have left me on the ground.

    No thanks.
    #89
  10. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    No doubt about that. Though you can get away with one tree and your bike in a pinch, but I wouldn't want to ride out any weather like that.

    That's why I haven't sold my Tent, but I've also been lucky enough to not have to sleep in it for the last year either. :clap
    #90
  11. cdogg44

    cdogg44 Been here awhile

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    It's funny you say all of that...

    I've got a complete Warbonnet Blackbird hammock and Mambajamba setup complete with both quilts in my closet next to the tent and Exped. I took the Blackbird out many times with hopes of dialing it in but always ended up with the calf ridge issue putting my feet to sleep or my shoulders feeling tight and pressed together. Also with my neck condition I never found a pillow that stayed put. I haven't given up on hammocks as I think they are a great idea, but I just haven't been able to find a solution for "repeatable comfort" like a pad or bed. I was going to get a custom hammock made by Dream Hammock that was longer and wider than the WBBB, but we had a baby and life started to fly by (she turned a year old last week!!!).

    I've got a two night fishing/eating/drinking :D trip coming up in two weeks, and I want to make sure I'm as comfortable as possible or it's going to be miserable.
    #91
  12. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    :lol3

    Like I said, it's never one size fits all..

    PM sent.
    #92
  13. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

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    I have a bunch of different hammocks, and found that there is a learning curve.

    With gathered end type hammocks [most are]You need to commit to learn the correct tension and sleeping angle. If you don't take the time to learn then they simply won't be comfortable.

    [Pitching tarps are the same way in that you have some learning to do.]

    Bridge type hammock setup on the other hand require less learning. No need to find a sweet spot or angle.

    I have a Eureka Chrysalis that all you do is wrap one end around a tree, then the other tree, then pull it tight w/the Ancra style tension straps.

    It's not backpack friendly due to it's exta bulk and weight, but not a problem on a motocycle.

    Notice the storage space above and below.

    Also I hang stuff on the ridgeline.

    Deploy time less than a minute.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]










    Sorry for the hijack, but I hope this might help.
    #93
  14. theshnizzle

    theshnizzle Long timer

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    Ok, my burning question is,with a hammock, where do you put your .....stuff? Jacket,boots,gear,ect.....I would guess to change your clothes you have to slither around in the hammock ? Or stand outside in perhaps inclement weather and pack your gear and change and all the other stuff you do at a campsite.

    I have the extra storage room for my MSR Hubba Hubba,and I have lots of room to put my hard bags,jacket,clothes,make a meal,brush my teeth ect,ect, all stored out of the rain and I can keep dry while packing up as well.

    How does a hammock work in that respect?
    #94
  15. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    [​IMG]
    Not my setup, but if you get a decent tarp, there's more room than a tent, plus you can stand and you have a seat.


    I've got this one....

    [​IMG]

    Can be closed up pretty tight if you want.

    I hang my jacket from my Ridgeline, but some folks carry a 2nd very basic hammock and hang it under the main one and toss their gear in there.
    [​IMG]
    I can stand up to change. It's also super nice to have a place to sit to put on my boots. I can have the hammock body broken down and in its stuff sack in about 1 minute so it's one of the last things I do before getting on the bike
    #95
  16. Jeff B

    Jeff B Socially Awkward

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    Most hammock'ers pitch a tarp 1st, then their hammock under it. This solves most all of the weather issues.

    The ridgeline of the tarp is used to hang items or putting things in compression stuff sacks and then hanging them on the line.

    MY Eureka [bridge style] hammock has a storage pocket above my head and below my feet. It also has a ridgeline to hang stuff. Getting in and out of clothes is not as easy, but I have gotten pretty good at it. Cooking would be difficult and unsafe.

    The storage pockets mentioned above are larger than the pics suggest.
    #96
  17. Cabrito

    Cabrito Terminal Lurker

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    Worth it.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I've spent several nights on my luxurylite since I got it and absolutely love it.

    Best night sleep ever...
    #97
  18. Wadester

    Wadester Rides a dirty bike

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    I note your "bow" spacing - part of the instructions now, or your own idea? Shoulders in the open area? That's how I do mine.

    Yes. Comfy.
    #98
  19. munchmeister

    munchmeister Grow'd Up Mini Trail

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    I like everything you said except the above. How the hell does someone re-learn how to sleep? Maybe you youngsters or contortionists can do that. I've tried a hammock (1 or 2) and I love, love, love that they can be set up and torn down quickly. That is one great advantage over a big tent. But the only time I've been able to sleep on my back is in the hospital or in a Lazy Boy. Tossing and turning as I do, from side to side, makes the Luxury Lite the only thing I can sleep on. Once you fine tune the placement of the bowed arms, to allow for side sleeper's shoulders and hips, you can get a good night's rest.

    YMMV.
    #99
  20. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    He meant there's a learning curve to how to set one up correctly.

    I don't miss crawling out of a tent one bit. :deal

    But, if you're not going to hang, the luxury lite with a thermarest is a good alternative.