Mainland Mexico via Baja

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by miguelito, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. atk_nut

    atk_nut and atk_nut_wife

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    622
    Location:
    Duncan, BC
    We'll keep that in mind as it's next years ride.Enjoy the mountains...our sun burns did.Let us know about the weather down there as next year we will be in early spring.Try the coffee outside of Mexico city.It's a blend of coffee and spices.The best coffee we ever had.
    shiny side up
    atk_nut and clan
    #81
  2. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    As to the weather, it's definitely warm with my non-mesh riding jacket on when you're bogged down in traffic. It's like this every year, in that you need a heavy jacket to get down here, and then once you're here you need a mesh jacket. I almost brought mine thinking I'd ship the heavy jacket home, but, but... well... I didn't. So I'm sweltering a bit in the cities, but it's way better than it was down on the coast. BTW, I found the west coast hotter than the east. Not sure if that is because of the rain they get there, or whether it was a little variation during the week or so I was on the east coast at sea level.
    #82
  3. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    <meta name="Title" content=""> <meta name="Keywords" content=""> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"> <meta name="ProgId" content="Word.Document"> <meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 2008"> <meta name="Originator" content="Microsoft Word 2008"> <link rel="File-List" href="file://localhost/Users/michaeljones/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/msoclip/0clip_filelist.xml"> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG/> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves>false</w:TrackMoves> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:punctuationKerning/> <w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridHorizontalSpacing> <w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing>18 pt</w:DrawingGridVerticalSpacing> <w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery> <w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:DontAutofitConstrainedTables/> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx/> </w:Compatibility> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="276"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--> <style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Cambria; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-fareast-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --> </style> <!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} </style> <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> The ride started out with an excellent ride over the mountains from Tres Marias to Atlacomulco. This was a ride on twisties through tall, cool. Sunlight-speckled forests. As I descended the west side of the continental divide, the terrain reminded me of riding through a summer’s day in the Rocky Mountains. No pics from that section. Lots of scenic towns on the way.

    <o:p> [​IMG]</o:p>




    [​IMG]


    I made a quick detour off the cuota to this little town.

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]





    <o:p></o:p>
    Then I had to circumnavigate the traffic around Toluca before beginning a cuota marathon enroute to Morelia. Eventually I tired of the cuotas and jumped off at Maravatio and made a quick stop at the town plaza which was bounded by a lovely canopy of shade trees.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>

    <o:p></o:p>

    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>[​IMG]</o:p>

    <o:p></o:p>

    <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p>
    </o:p>
    Then I headed south to Ciudad Hidalgo, but didn’t stop, heading East toward Morelia on the libre. This may be my favorite section of road to ride in Mexico. It’s about 80 km of perfectly cambered twisties, and no weird, changing radius curves. You’re riding along the mountaintop for a good stretch before beginning the descent to the valley below.



    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]


    Watch out for drywall nails and dead animals when you pull over to take pictures

    [​IMG]


    Outstanding views on this section from Ciudad Hidalgo to Morelia

    [​IMG]




    View up the street from the hotel to the plaza

    [​IMG]




    <!--EndFragment-->
    #83
  4. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Swooping along the ridge of the Sierra Madres, I'm in the zone, smiling and inwardly applauding the civil engineers who so perfectly cambered the tilt of this mountain road as I flick the bike from left to right and back to left, over and over, for 80 km sans any other traffic to speak of. Riding into the city from the mountain pass to the East, my route parallels a 250+ year old stone aqueduct that casts some welcome shade in the afternoon sun. I arrive in el centro of this Mexican town and find its stone architecture beautiful and impressive.


    [​IMG]


    It can be hard finding hotels while riding in Mexican cities, due to the colonial architecture, which presents a featureless facade to the street with only doors and a windows to break up the visual plane of an entire city block. My concentration is also distracted by the frenzy of cars and motorbikes weaving between lanes during rush hour here in the center of town. [​IMG]



    Street scene
    [​IMG]




    Mexican hoteliers generally don't put flashing neon signs out front like their American counterparts, but often paint an unobtrusive sign or affix a small plaque near the door announcing their service instead. So I park and begin trekking the town on foot in search of affordable lodging. The first place I spy looks lovely but the nightly tariff of over $200 US, forces me along the boulevards in search of more economical digs. Eventually I find a cute little hotel in a centuries old building a few blocks from the plaza. They offer clean, windowless rooms for about $22US, and several deluxe rooms with windows, ($33US), which face the street, a beautiful church, and a park. I opt for a window room in spite of the extra cost and what I know will mean more street noise.


    The church across the street from the Hotel del Carmen
    [​IMG]




    This city has a reputation for drug-related violence, but you wouldn't know it by observing what I've seen. It's a spectacularly beautiful town, with a colonial heritage and a cosmopolitan blend of people. Sidewalk cafes abound, and a mix of young and old, urbane Mexicanos surround me as I join a amiable late afternoon crowd to read my Kindle and enjoy a cerveza following the day's long ride. Two young men playing chess at a neighboring table finish their game and ask me about my electronic book, and we launch into a discussion of its properties, then move on to books and authors we've enjoyed, and eventually segue into a meandering discussion of the nature of being.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    Our conversation is one in which before we've scratched the surface of the topic at hand, I'm in over my head due to my tenuous command of the Spanish language. Nonetheless, it's interesting and rewarding to try to construct complex sentences, so less mundane than the solitary traveler's norm, which generally consists of ascertaining how much a hotel room costs, or explaining what one wants to eat for dinner. Thankfully one of them spent 5 years in London, and speaks passable English, so when we broach the more arcane metaphysics he becomes the de facto translator between his friend and myself. Our exchange is as intense as the conversations and laughter surrounding us are light-hearted.

    Jose is a Toreador of the bullring, a man of action, and Catolico. He believes in God, thinks the divine being is often unhappy with his creation, and is not always a benevolent god. Geraldo is cerebral, an agnostic musician studying physics at a local university, and is of a Jewish family here in a country that is overwhelmingly Catholic. He's engaged but is concerned that once married, he'll see the door close permanently on his musical career. Both men are in their twenties and count fewer than half the years of my own life.

    When Geraldo asks me where I'm staying, I tell them the name of the quaint little stone hotel a few blocks away. They look at each other and laugh, telling me that the hotel is famous for its hookers. Geraldo warns me that if I'm inclined to partake of this particular vice I should beware, as not all of the hookers are of the female persuasion, and that particular fact might not be readily apparent until one gets up close and personal with them. I laugh, and ponder my seemingly inherent ability to inject myself into interesting situations.

    When Jose checks the time, we are all surprised to find that we've been talking for almost 4 hours. Good company can be hard to find, and I offer my thanks for the serendipity of these new friendships. As we bid each other goodnight we make plans to meet again tomorrow evening to continue the discussion.

    [​IMG]




    It's good to have some stories to tell, so when I return to the hotel and the park fronting the church, I'm vaguely disappointed to find it devoid of hookers and transvestites, but am somewhat consoled by the presence of a small street performance group and their audience along the promenade.
    [​IMG]

    A subsequent evening was spent with an unusually nervous manager from Mexico's financial sector. During that evening's conversation he told me that Che Guevara was an icon for him in his life as well as in his thinking about finances and monetary policy. Surprised by this admission, I commented as to how rare I thought such a predilection might be for those working in the financial sector in the US. We then segued into a discussion of Che, Latin-America, emerging economies, and the importance these economies will have on the economic and political direction the world will take in the near future. I wondered afterward if his nervous tics could be manifestations of some cognitive dissonance between his job and his socialist philosophy, or if alternatively they might be from his obvious need to cheat on his wife while traveling for business.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #84
  5. dwj - Donnie

    dwj - Donnie Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2006
    Oddometer:
    16,908
    Location:
    Traveling on the Moto
    Hi!

    Enjoying your ride! How long will you be traveling?

    Donnie
    #85
  6. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Glad to have you along Donnie. I enjoyed following your travels this year as well. I'm not entirely sure how long I'll be down here. I have no time constraints, so the only thing I know for sure is that my visa/vehicle permit expires on June 15, so I can confidently predict my exit from Mexico by then. :rofl
    #86
  7. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    I left Morelia and planned on stopping in Patzcuaro, which my friends in Alamos had told me last year was a beautiful town and area. I came into town from a nice ride on the libre and followed the town's signs to El Centro, but only found a pretty funky little town. I decided to ride on to Uruapan, but stopped for lunch near the lake, where my waiter told me that I had been misled by one sign, and pointed me back in the real direction of town. Man, I'm happy I stopped for lunch and got the right beta, 'cause this is a very beautiful town, and the nights are literally cool.
    [​IMG]
    I stopped at the "Our Pick", midrange hotel from Lonely Planet, and found their prices almost 1-1/2 times what lonely Planet listed. Seems like being featured in Lonely Planet is kinda like the kiss of death for a place if you're a traveler looking for good deals. So I walked down the street, and stopped into what should have been a hotel with a price similar to the first stop. My first question to the proprietess, was if they had parking for my moto, and she said that they didn't. I asked how much the rooms were anyway, and she replied 200 pesos, or about $18 US. That was less than 1/2 the price listed in Lonely Planet for the Hotel San Alejandro, so I figured I'd rent a space in a garage downtown, which allowed me to ride into the plaza for dinner each night, park the bike, and then walk the 3 blocks back to the hotel. Crazily enough the parking cost 70 peso's for overnight parking, and 120 if you left the moto in 24 hours. So I guess what I'm trying to say here is the Hotel San Alejandro is a kick ass hotel, clean, nice terrace, and I got cut a hell of a good deal. :clap:clap

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If you come to Patzcuaro, and feel like a steak, I had the best steak since entering Mexico at the Argentinian steakhouse, called "Mistonga" which is just off the main plaza.

    I rode a circumnavigation of the lake one day, stopping in most of the small towns surrounding it. I'm running out of power on my laptop, and will come back to add more here later.
    #87
  8. soulduck

    soulduck RJB

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Utah
    A friend has followed Steve's books in many places and when finding the prices higher has tried saying that he plans to write Rick and get the information updated in the next edition. He says that the price often drops right down. They don't want to lose the endorsement.
    I am following your trip and enjoying your great write-ups and pictures.
    #88
  9. abogado68

    abogado68 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Oddometer:
    109
    Miguelito,

    I'm in Zamora just about 100kms north from Patzcuaro. The road is great, rode it past Sunday, ifyou decide to come down this way give me a call. dialing from Mexico 01 351 131 0818 dialing from Zamora 1310818. The MOTOFIESTA begins tomorrow in Morelia, don't miss it you will have a lot of fun.
    #89
  10. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Hola amigo! I'm now in San Miguel de Allende, so I think I'll miss you. As much of a gringo town as this is, I've met some good peeps, and think I'll stay here for a while. I'm thinking of renting an apartment for a month or so, so if you come over this way, PM me and I'll give you the contact coordinates, and the first two cervezas are on me. ;)
    #90
  11. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Hola soulduck! Yeah. I may contact Lonely Planet and provide an update for them. I usually only use the book as a starting point anyway, so I'm not terribly put out by the discrepancies. Thanks for following along amigo.
    #91
  12. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Well, I kinda stalled out here in keeping this trip report up to date. I will get back to it though for those of you following along. I reached a point a couple of weeks ago, where i was feeling tooo connected via the web, and that I wasn't really feeling like I'd gotten away, (which was one of my main objectives of this trip). So if you are actually following along, bear with me. I'll update as I can, and am inclined.

    Here are some pics from the Patzcuaro area in the meantime:

    Tarasco ruins near Ihuatzio. This is the only site of pre-Columbian ruins in Mexico that had a wall surrounding the main plaza, presumably for defense.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Lots of beautiful rock walls of volcanic stone near Ihuatzio.
    [​IMG]

    I rode a circumnavigation of the lake and stopped in many of the small towns surrounding it. The Catholic priest who worked to empower the local indios in the area steered the different villages into working in different crafts, and still today, the various villages are reknowned for basket weaving, wood carving, stone carving, pottery, weaving, furniture making, and more. It's a very art-craft oriented area, and beautiful to boot.

    View from a nice little restaurant I stopped at on the West side of the lake
    [​IMG]

    I think this is Ihuatzio.
    [​IMG]



    This was in San Andres. If you get there, stop and buy a beer from Jaime at the cervezeria on the corner of the plaza, and say "Hi" from me.

    [​IMG]

    The dogs of San Andres. I think these perros have their priorities pretty well figured out. I rode between them, and they never batted an eye.
    [​IMG]

    San Andres
    [​IMG]

    Can't remember this town's name, but it was pretty big, and on the west side of the lake. Many of the locals speak the indigenous language only in these villages.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Another small village I rode off the lake road about 8 km to explore.
    [​IMG]

    Bull fighting is big in the area.
    [​IMG]

    Some ranches have their own bull fight rings...
    [​IMG]

    Back to Patzcuaro
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    This was my second floor terrace outside the lovely and economico Hotel de San Alejandro
    [​IMG]

    And the view from it.
    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately after returning from a boat trip to the main island, Janitzio, I found my memory card dislodged in my camera, so I missed out on those photos. :(
    #92
  13. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    It's a beautiful, and fun ride on the libre from Patzcuaro to Uruapan. I had planned on spending at least a night in Uruapan, but decided to ride on to Guanajuato in one day. Unfortunately my memory chip in my camera was dislodged for my whole trip through Guanajuato and to San Miguel de Allende, so I have no photos of the beautiful, but difficult to drive in, town of Guanajuato. Parking is almost impossible to find downtown even with a moto, so I checked into the first hotel with parking that I came to after exiting the series of tunnels under the city, (Antiguo & Vapor). It turned out to be a rather expensive place to stay. I had thought I might rent an apartment spend a longer time in Guanajuato, but something about the town didn't ring a bell with me, plus it felt a little claustrophobic, so I moved on after three nights.

    The ride to Dolores Hidalgo is beautiful, has no topes to speak of, and is fun to ride on a moto. I stopped in Dolores H., but quickly left for San Miguel de Allende. I was prepared to not spend much time here, but I found the most comfortable bed I've slept in for the last three months at Hotel Casa Linda, again not cheap, but not as much as my Guanajuato hotel.

    The view from the terrace outside my room at Hotel Casa Linda.
    [​IMG]

    I just rented a really nice casita here for the next month, so I'm in for a long stay here.

    Street scene outside my casita.
    [​IMG]

    Views from the casita's rooftop terrace.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Typical street scene.
    [​IMG]

    The town bull ring.
    [​IMG]

    I looked at smaller places to rent, and there are plenty available, with a short walk to el centro for around $450 US/month. After looking at a few, I decided to splurge on a bigger, and much nicer casita only 2 blocks from the jardin, (el centro). If anyone wants to see what $900/month rents in San Miguel, here's a pretty lousy video, but it will give you an idea of what you can get.

    <object height="385" width="640">


    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/d7cMYs7OyiQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="385" width="640"></object>

    and a link in case the embed doesn't work. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7cMYs7OyiQ<object height="385" width="640"></object>


    It's a charming little town and the restaurants are really good and a welcome change from my diet of tacos and enchiladas from the last 3+ months.
    #93
  14. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Well my account of this moto ride begins with a girl, (and a beautiful one at that). I got a call from Bekka as I sat on the rooftop terrace of my rental here in the colonial town of San Miguel de Allende sipping tequila, drinking beer, and smoking cigarillos with three friends. She proceeded to inform me that she was with a couple of motorcyclist friends at a bar across town, and they were going on a moto ride tomorrow, then passed the phone off to her friend Art.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Art proceeded to invite me to join him and a couple of other riders for what he promised would be a spectacular overnight ride with a short section of dirt on “maintained dirt roads”. While I’m not a big off road rider, I’ve done some dirt, even some single track, and within a few minutes a rendezvous time and place was agreed upon for the following morning.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    When I awoke, and the after-effects of the beer and tequila were making themselves felt, I considered rolling over and going back to sleep, but mustered myself and rode out to the rendezvous where I met Art, George, and Charley for the first time. We traveled a long ways on pretty boring roads albeit with beautiful views before finally busting off onto a side road with beautiful sweeping turns and speco views in all directions. A lakeside section took us through a long rock hewn tunnel where upon exiting we stopped to look at a dam built into a narrow cleft in the rock before entering another tunnel. We heard shouting, and eventually snapped to the fact that it was the marines guarding the dam telling us to make like hockey players and “get the puck out of there”.
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    http://i759.photobucket.com/albums/xx236/miguelitobones/Zimapam%20to%20San%20Joaquin/DSCN3773.jpg
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Eventually we gassed up in the town of Zimapan and took off on a dirt road toward what would turn out to be a road to an area full of mines. We descended through a series of switchbacks what must have been a drop of a few thousand feet, occasionally pulling over for the oncoming ore hauling trucks.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    When we reached the riverbed so far below our point of entry, the heat was incredible and my helmet and non-mesh jacket I brought with me into Mexico in January were saturated.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    After crossing the river, we began the slow ascent of even tighter, less well maintained roads. The riding, was slow but not too difficult, though the price of error could have been great as the outside edge of the road was a continuous drop-off that could send one tumbling for hundreds of feet before much would stop you. We stopped a couple of times on the ascent and eventually reached a pullout where we could see a little village way below us with a bridge crossing a large river. It was here we realized that that bridge was where we wanted to be, and a decision was made which direction to go to reach it as we had just passed a fork in the road we’d been traveling.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    In the upper right of this pic you can see the bridge we want to get to.
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    George thought we needed to continue up, and took off on his KLR, but as the rest of us surveyed the roads below us, we thought the lower fork might be the way down to the bridge. Charley took off after George, and soon returned with Jorge and we soon found the lower fork dead-ending into the open maw of a mine. A mine worker explained that for us to reach the bridge, we needed to descend all the way back the way we came to the river and ride the river bed out to the little town we’d seen from above. Did somebody say “river bed”? What happened to the “maintained roads” Art had been peddling the previous night? It began to dawn on me that these guys were doppelgangers for my friends back in the US. Not much difference whatsoever really, as they all continually sucker me into going places I would never have chosen to go left to my own devices, and therein lies the adventure in this adventure ride.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    So about face we go, and descend to the dry riverbed again and turn downstream through a vertical cleft and a shallow stream that is spectacularly beautiful. We continue on with occasional stops under shade trees. I’m seriously dehydrated at this point, and am kicking myself for liking the taste of tequila so much, as well as not having the foresight to bring a bottle of water. The ride through the shallow creek goes on and on and the place is magical, although some of the magic may have been due to my growing punchiness from my dehydration. [FONT=&quot]&#9786;[/FONT] Eventually we began to see signs of human habitation, and the riverbed track turned onto an ungraded dirt road paralleling a large river. We’re almost back to civilization, and all I can think of is reaching the first tienda, and snagging a liter of cold water to quench my parched throat.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    We’re almost racing now on the hardpack, and I’m probably too close to Art’s tail, but I can taste that cool water in the back of my mind and can’t seem to dial it back. As we enter a dry dusty stretch where the dust from Art’s bike obscures my view of the road, I see his rear wheel bobble a bit, but it’s too late for Miguel to adjust velocity or direction and as I hit the same point, my bike decides it’s tired, and wants to lie down for a bit. Oops!
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Well, the Versys’s left quarter faring isn’t as pretty as it used to be, (busted up real good actually), and my inattention to chain maintenance is showing, as the chain is off the rear sprocket, and the wheel is spinning freely. I heard/felt something crack when I fell on my left rear shoulder, but I don’t feel too bad, so with a big assist from Charley, we get the bike back up and the chain back on, and continue the remaining ½ mile of dirt to the bridge and pavement. Ain’t that the way it always goes?
    <o:p> </o:p>
    At the first tienda, we all down a liter of agua and a few of us quaff a beer as well. It’s a sign of how dehydrated I must have been that I didn’t drink a beer. That almost never happens… [FONT=&quot]&#9786;[/FONT]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Now we’re on an amazing paved road, with an excellent surface as we begin ascending thousands of feet, until eventually we’re in the trees, and the temperature is cool, especially with my jacket soaked in sweat.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    After a brief tour of the mountain town of San Joaquin we settle into the first hotel we passed upon entering town, and after a cursory cleanup, begin drinking beer and tequila, (courtesy of Jorge!). As the sun sets we move across the street to another restaurant and are eventually politely asked by the staff to leave, so they can clean up and go home. Ha!
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Day 2 is a gorgeous ride with nice sweeping turns punctuated by sharp twisties, out of San Joaquin and back to San Miguel on the slab. After a lunch stop with a view at a local hang gliding spot, we hit the trail and are back in SMA in time for the weekly meeting of the local motorcyclists club, Motoclassico de San Miguel de Allende and more drinking. Go figger…
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    [​IMG]
    <o:p> </o:p>
    In spite of my dump, it was a great trip with a great bunch of guys. Thanks to Bekka and the boys for inviting me.
    <!--EndFragment-->
    #94
  15. zhousir19820815

    zhousir19820815 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    14
    :clap :clap :clap nice,very beauterful!:clap
    #95
  16. mundobravo

    mundobravo Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,209
    Location:
    new mexico
    great photos !! hows the arm old man ? ..lol ...
    #96
  17. miguelito

    miguelito Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    505
    Location:
    San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
    Actually doing well after a painful first week following the dump. I'll see you in a month or so amigo.
    #97
  18. gasandasphalt

    gasandasphalt Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    530
    Location:
    S/W New Mexico
    Miss the reports,, how is the arm?? need to keep this on the front page :1drink
    #98
  19. mundobravo

    mundobravo Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,209
    Location:
    new mexico
    Gasandasphalt - Miguelito is back in NM, and just passed through Santa Fe, on a tour of the Rockies with his new girlfriend from Mexico, (cute!), :clap . He's traveling without a computer, and says he'll update the thread when he settles down for awhile.
    #99
  20. gasandasphalt

    gasandasphalt Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    530
    Location:
    S/W New Mexico
    I wondered what ever happened to him.... glad he is back and in good health.....G&A