Make way for Geländehack, yet another GS sidecar

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by iHop, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. iHop

    iHop Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    21
    Make way for Geländehack, yet another GS sidecar
    #1
  2. alaskawilmer

    alaskawilmer Wilmer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    222
    Location:
    Helena, Montanta
    Yes, keep your report coming our way. I enjoy the process.
    Do you recommend Jay's shop? Good service?

    Thanks!
    #2
  3. claude

    claude Sidecar Jockey

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,162
    Location:
    Middleburg, Pa. (Snyder County)
    Great work! I have been threatening to do one of those 'spray skirt' type tonneau covers ever since Bob Henig brought his GG Duetto to the RON DEE VOO....Good to see you got one done !!
    #3
  4. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,310
    Location:
    Prescott, Arizona, USA
    Wow...about the rain skirt. LOve it. I have the same Hack as you and would love to have this rain cover. Do you make these for others? Another thing you might consider is making a rigid bracket for the windshield. Going 50-70 mph the windshield tonneau cover stretches seriously and needs to be controlled. After a few stretches the windshield no longer protects the rider...she'll get a full blast.
    #4
  5. Max

    Max generic humanoid

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2003
    Oddometer:
    43
    Location:
    Palatine Illinois
    "The Stiggette, or whomever, can be dry and warm:":rofl

    Some say that the outline of her left nipple is exactly the same shape as the Nurburg ring...

    Some say there is no theory of evolution.. only a list of animals she has allowed to live.
    #5
  6. Matt the Wanderer

    Matt the Wanderer Supremely Not Lost

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    265
    Location:
    Over the next hill
    I love that cover on the yellow rig and would love to find one for my current project which is also K100 based. Did you fab that yourself of have it made?
    #6
  7. Dr Jim

    Dr Jim Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    500
    I just love stuff like your shifter linkage:

    [​IMG]

    It's so determinedly High-Zoot - all fabricated, welded, polished, and clearly very well thought-out in advance. Notice how the bell-crank uses a BMW shift lever barrel bolt and its nifty oil-lite bushing along with the dual ball-joint shift rod. Someone devoted some care and effort to designing this piece

    My solutions tend to be rude, crude, examples of 'Applied Bubba' at it's most dreadful Low-Zoot worst - where a helpless chunk of aluminum is assaulted by a hyperactive imagination wielding dull drills and a trembling Dremel:

    [​IMG]

    Here a hapless Pingel sport-bike mount has been butchered, drilled, and painfully grafted onto the left rear subframe bolt and then fitted to a Touratech adjustable shift lever. The only 'clever' 3-beer thinking in the entire lash-up is how the stock TT folding peg was re-adapted.

    The peg's top mounting tab was rudely bent 90 degrees with a Vise Grip, providing the mount point for the shifter linkage, while the shift peg folds against a bushing bolted through the lower tab:

    [​IMG]

    Of course the shifter lash-up is in keeping with the rest of the bike, which has not yet achieved 'Rat Bike' status solely because the Rats want nothing to to do with it:

    [​IMG]

    Cheers

    Jim
    #7
  8. W. Boyter

    W. Boyter Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Oddometer:
    120
    Location:
    DFW
    Shiatsu. My mama often told me that my existence may only be to serve as a warning to others...
    #8
  9. mikepa

    mikepa SideCzarist

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    306
    Location:
    Seattle, WA in the Great Pacific NorthWET (USA)
    Hey Dr. Jum -

    You betch'a, iHOP's shifter likage is a work of industrial art! However, yours works for you, different strokes, etc., so it's all good.

    Question for you, how reliable has your KILKTRONIC shiftre been for you?

    I opted for the Pingel only because I assumed there would be problems with any of these, and was wary of buying something this specialzed that was made overseas (even if "overseas" was our former Colonial Master :D <G>).

    However, I've wound up having to purchase a new Pingel at least once a year, there isn't really a good wiper on the shift shaft/rod, and dust, dirt and rain water work their way into the shifter body, which eventually causes the shift rod to rsut itself to the windings. I do a couple of 6K+ miles overseas every year, and these take their toll on the Pingels.

    I've also had the shift module fail (not the ignition kill module, which I don't use), and have had to replace the shift buttons twice - all in all, a pretty poor reliabiility record, though Pingel has been very good about some customer goodwill in compensation for the problems I've had. These Pingels are VERy spendy. . . .

    Thanks!
    #9
  10. Dr Jim

    Dr Jim Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    500
    Hi Mike ...

    The Kliktronics is installed as a matter of grim expedience, my Pingle solenoid lunched its coil one afternoon, wasn't rebuildable, and the Kliktronics was in the parts bin because its linkage rod had snapped off at the top of the threads. Cut some new threads on the rod and popped it into the Pingel mounting.

    Slowly asssembling the several hundreds of dollars needed to buy another Pingel solenoid, and seriously considering a Translogic shifter ($821 + overseas freight YIKES!) but whilst the brain is willing, the wallet is weak .....

    Oddly enough, the Kliktronics solenoid has been quite reliable for the last four years - since the Kliktroincs controller promptly gunnysacked about two weeks after its warrenty expired. It isn't as strong as the Pingle, and has a shorter useful stroke, but the Pingle controller seems quite happy driving it and it does shift well now that I've juggled the mount and linkages.

    The Pingel switches are less than amusing - I've a small collection of them in the junk box, since they croak pretty quickly and even their handlebar mounts are flimsy and ill-fitting.

    iHOP sort of casually mentions using the BMW turnsignals as "paddleshifters..." I'd like to know more about how he did this - and what he used as turnsignal switches - iHOP?

    Cheers

    Jim
    #10
  11. mikepa

    mikepa SideCzarist

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    306
    Location:
    Seattle, WA in the Great Pacific NorthWET (USA)
    Absolutely brilliant! I am definately going to convert all three of my hacks' shifter systems over to the relays, as I've had three control modules fry themselves - they don't like high ambient temps, two failed in Africa, and one along the Silk Road.

    I also sourced the connectors, boots and crimping tool for the "Mil-Spec" connectors Pingel uses a while ago, needed them for accessory installs on a Hummer H1 I used to off-road (yes, it's gone, way too politically incorrect to own in the very politically correct Pacific NorthWET :huh ).

    Didn't know Pingel made an ATV-configured unit. The Pingel tech support guys, and Donna Pingel herself, never mentioned this during our "chat sessions" in regard to the failures I've had. Will definately check this out also - thanks so much for the info - keep it coming!

    Best,
    #11
  12. Dr Jim

    Dr Jim Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    500
    This is an elegant solution - I'd been toying with a similar idea, where the shift buttons would select the shift (up or down) but the solenoid wouldn't be activated until the clutch lever was engaged - acting like the old Cotal or Wilson pre-selector gearboxes - but yours makes more intuitive sense.

    Let me see if I understand how you've constructed your arrangement. I'm guessing that there's a single SPST(single pole, single throw) relay on the 12V side, whose 'normal' position feeds DC to the turnsignal relay, but when powered by the clutch interlock, switches power to the control circuit(s) of the shifter relay(s) - which are then live until the clutch is no longer engaged.

    At first, I thought "How do you turn signal when sitting at a light?" Then I remembered that once pulsed by the turn signal paddle, the flasher unit continues flashing until canceled.

    Clever...

    I like to use Bosch 75 amp (0 332 002 156) relays to switch shifter solenoids, but they should be used with external diodes to lower arcing at the contacts.

    I've also considered building a driver circuit that would use the gearbox sending unit to sense when the gears are engaged - so a gearshift button press would power the solenoid circuit until the gearbox sensor goes positive, or until a timeout threshold is exceeded. This would neatly shape the solenoid power pulse, and allow for BMW's VERY slow 1-2nd shift, while not overdriving the other much quicker shifts.

    Mike - could you share your source for the connectors on the Pingle? I need to finish installing the Kliktronics correctly.


    Thanks

    Jim
    #12
  13. Dr Jim

    Dr Jim Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    500
    Walt & iHop -

    Your very nifty and well-integrated paddle-shifting arrangement inspired me to go wandering around the dank and musty back halls of Darkest eBay, where I found this useful little Guppy:

    [​IMG]

    It's the left-side switch cluster from an R1100RT - which neatly popped onto my R1100GS bars - taking the place of the stock switchgear between the heated grips and and the clutch-lever perch.

    What it adds is the green paddle, originally intended to raise or lower the RT's electric windshield - that's a self-centering, SPDT switch, rated at 3 amps - perfect for controlling an electric shifter.

    So, here's another way to integrate electric shifting into an R-bike - it's actually quite ergonomic, the paddle is large enough and close enough to easily 'THWACK!' with my thumb, and it's behind the light, horn, and turn signal controls - which may cut down on sudden, inadvertant downshifts. There's something SO exciting about locking up the back tire while blowing the horn - it really gets the cell-phone dreamer's attention....

    Cheers

    Jim
    #13
  14. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

    Joined:
    May 9, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,124
    Location:
    CheeseHead Land...
    So, who did the reverse gear on iHop's bike? W.Kayser?

    I have been looking for a way to add reverse to my R1200RT/Hannigan rig.

    I have a flyer from Kayser, but the listing for reverse gear for the 6-speed gearboxes does not show the developed gearset, nor a price. It just says contact them for more info.

    Unfortunately, they do not have an english speaker/writer for correspondence. And my 5th/6th grade german is a bit rusty...

    Thanks!
    #14
  15. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar

    Joined:
    May 9, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,124
    Location:
    CheeseHead Land...
    PM sent...

    I would not be suprised if the gearbox was actually sourced from Kayser. They have been the preeminent BMW gearbox builder for years. I find it hard to imagine that there would be a big enough market for there to be multiple makers & competition for reverse gear motorcycle gearboxes for the same models.
    (but I have been wrong about things before...)
    #15
  16. BeemerChef

    BeemerChef Wandering Homeless

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,329
    Location:
    Living under the Stars...
    Hi iHop... sorry we missed you also... but you know, that is Life on the Road! We meet our Friends when least expected... and miss them when planning not to... But our hearts are always together.
    Denver? I know we will be in CO soon (whatever that means you know...) and will hook up...
    Quite a rig you are having... I won't get into the technical stuff because I know nothing about all that... just the basics you know!!! Love that rear wheel and tire though... Life saver I have to say and wallet saver...
    Be well... always!
    Ara & Spirit

    PS: will be in Moab another week or so... exhausted from too much fun I think!
    #16
  17. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,310
    Location:
    Prescott, Arizona, USA
    Wow, iHOP & Gespannfahrerin....gorgeous. I like the McMaster vibration dampers. Great job on the damper plates. I'll do the same after my trip. Is the number stamped on them the item number? How thick are they and once air compressed how far do they rise? Have tested the brakes yet? As for the lenses, buy some film that they use for PIAA lens protective cover....wrap some of these on the front and all sides. It'll protect and strengthen the plastic some. I still used the original brass screws but added a dab of red locktite while tightening them lightly.
    #17
  18. Abenteuerfahrer

    Abenteuerfahrer Deaf on Wheels

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,310
    Location:
    Prescott, Arizona, USA
    Ach du Lieber....beautiful. Yellow, I always love yellow.....won't have any conspicuity problem. Can even find you on Goggle Earth, he,he! Great idea of using spray bed-liner for the insides as the insides came pretty raw(fiberglass and wood). Be looking for a yellow/yellow three wheeler...:clap

    CHeers...........
    #18
  19. Dr Jim

    Dr Jim Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    500
    Looking VERY good indeed ...

    Two questions:

    Are you planning to run 'beakless' since moving the Telelever struts forward for trail reduction puts the fender/hugger pretty close to the beak?

    I'm still considering this, but am concerned about overheating, since the beak looks like it puts a lot of extra air through the oil cooler, which needs all the help it can get during the summer.

    If I do remove the beak, I'd be very tempted to put two or three open-frame cooling fans like the one on this heatsink:

    [​IMG]

    behind the oil cooler. It's not necessary to use anything complex like a thermostat and relay to control them, they only draw about two watts, are pretty quiet, and should run nearly forever if they're just powered from the ignition circuit through a dropping resistor. There's a pretty good selection of 12V, moderate RPM (e.g. less than 2000) quiet computer case fans in sizes from 60-180mm at NewEgg - and they're all pretty cheap too.

    The other question is about the isolation mounts for the tub - I think that they're a great idea, but I wonder if it would be worthwhile to construct brackets so that they'd be lowered by an inch or two?

    The snubber for my swingarm rotted away, so I've been playing around using rubber stoppers as replacement snubbers, and was disconcerted to find that as little as a 1/2" change in ride height made a very perceptable difference in the rig's handling - and it looks like the mounts raise the tub by a good two inches.

    Cheers

    Jim
    #19
  20. TouringDave

    TouringDave Tri Moto Veritas

    Joined:
    May 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    7,124
    Location:
    Frankston, Vic, Aust.
    Dayum! that's purdy!

    Well done iHop, very nice indeed! :clap
    #20