Making my KTM hand controlled

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by silverboy, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

    Joined:
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    544
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    Boulder.Colorado
    I lost the use of my left leg and both feet in a skydiving accident 8 years ago. I broke my back and spinal cord damage does not heal over time so I made some changes...
    It took some research and testing, but i have a system that works very well for riding with hand controls only. I can ride 99% what everyone rides and have started racing in a few enduros. This bike is 2004 525. Torque is good.
    Heres how I did it:


    1. Buy Revloc or Rekluse auto clutch so clutch lever can be replaced with brake lever.
    Revloc

    On a more recent conversion I used a rekluse instead of Revloc. The rekluse seems to prevent more spinning on the rear tire somehow. It also seems to tolerate abuse a bit better, I have had no problems in 2000 miles where I had many problems with the Revloc. The funny noise the rekluse makes is normal when bogging.


    2. Buy Pingel shifter and mount to custom metal bar by shifter
    Pingel

    I bend the shaft frequently. It costs about $75 to have it rebuilt. I have two pistons, so one is fresh when needed.
    This part is not made for dirt bikes but works amazingly well considering.


    3. Buy Zipty racing peg extensions to help feet stay on pegs.
    Zipty



    4. I had my suspension lowered 2" so my feet could touch. I had front and rear shocks lowered by Stillwell.
    http://www.stillwellperformance.com/main/2011-race-team/
    I fall mostly when stopped... and my skid plate hits more, but well worth not falling over all the time due to very weak quads.

    Custom tranny cover:
    [​IMG]

    The other threat of lowering a bike is your feet are closer to the ground.
    [​IMG]

    The only advantage of not feeling your feet is being able to finish long rides after doing this to my foot...



    Getting it on the bike

    Installation of auto clutch is not too bad. The new clutch basket is easily removed with oily fingers and an impact driver.
    For quicker installation, use driver bits with t15 star head to twist many small screws. Pay particular attention to washers under basket. Laying bike on side during installation helps.

    [​IMG]

    Cover for clutch side is a simple plate or better, a custom threaded rod into the top of your existing clutch cover.

    [​IMG]

    Replace clutch with brake lever. Magura makes this. Remove foot brake and have new hose made at auto shop for about $60.

    My KTM 450 xcw uses brake fluid for the clutch. For that convesion I just had a new hose made. Super easy!

    [​IMG]

    Install shifter on some sort of metal bracket custom made for your bike.
    I made mine with 3/16 plate, a drill, metal cut off wheel, a vise and blow torch to heat the metal into bending easier.
    It took several tries, but the bar is perfect now. I ground a slight curve in bottom to clear crankcase.

    [​IMG]

    Mounting the steel bracket is not too bad if the holes line up. After a few versions, mine uses all stock holes with longer bolts. Make sure the shifter can rotate on a bushing to optimize shifting angle for piston. This is supplied with shifter and is critical to install properly.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Wiring the shifter is not too bad. It attaches to the battery and one other wire shown in installation manual.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Making foot pegs larger made riding so much better. My balance is pretty bad so larger pegs enabled me to stand.

    [​IMG]

    Thats it. Riding again. Hope this helps someone get back in the saddle.

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    That's pretty inspiring!! Congratulations on getting after it, great engineering, love it.

    How do you deal with falling over with your feet? Is is difficult to get back on the bike?
    #2
  3. egoy2

    egoy2 perpetual n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    36
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    CT, USA
    Thanks for this,silverboy.
    I don't have need for this info at the moment, but I have this (irrational?) fear that I'll have to do something similar to my bike in the future. Nice to know it can be done!
    #3
  4. GoGoGavin41

    GoGoGavin41 Isn't this that guy?

    Joined:
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    "America's Finest City" ...wait, what?
    :thumb Awesome!

    Just curious, but can you still ride standing or is it all seat time?
    #4
  5. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    I try not to put my feet down much, it usually ends up falling over. My legs do support my body weight but only when flat footed. Lowering my bike helped a lot. It has taught me to be a better rider actually. But, I have been blamed for not wanting to stop while riding with Normals(that is pc term for people with all their limbs and ability to move them). Riding is easier than sitting on my bike. I usually stop next to a tree or raised area like a rock or piece of wood to put my leg down.


    When I fall or know Ill need to use my leg, I just push my way off the bike and let it fall on its own. Ive learned to do this quite well... I also have made a custom tranny case cover our of plate steel to better protect the casing. JB weld is awesome but steel is better.

    Getting the bike up sucks. It just takes more time and energy. In bad spots I usually get help, that is why I try to ride with large men who can lift or push my bike on their own.
    See this story: Page 6 and up.
    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=723917&page=7
    #5
  6. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

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    I sit most of the time. I stand when possible but my balance sucks and I really can't control the bike well while on the pegs. My legs will work for a short amount of time before becoming useless. Standing for a few seconds at a time seems to work better. I've developed a standing style like a horse jockey, it starts at my knees pinched against the gas tank and does not rely on my feet on the pegs as much. I have my butt about 6-10" above the seat. Its not as good as standing but is much better on rough terrain than sitting.
    #6
  7. selaznog

    selaznog Avoiding pavement

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    Do the Zipty peg extensions simply bolt on, or did you have to drill holes in the OEM pegs?
    #7
  8. Easy-Z

    Easy-Z Me wanna be

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    What's the non-PC term? :evil

    Very cool! :thumb
    #8
  9. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

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    Non pc-term is Lucky...
    :1drink
    #9
  10. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

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    The extensions require drilling of oem peg with normal bit. It is easy but does weaken the peg. I have broken several zip ty extensions and two factory pegs:
    [​IMG]

    I am going to try some weld on peg extensions next but have not found anything nearly as big as the zip tys. They are amazing when new!
    #10
  11. Vicks

    Vicks gets stuck in sand

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    :lol3 :lol3

    Helmets off to your attitude in life. Keep riding. :freaky
    #11
  12. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

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    On a RTW ride - next stop USA!
    +1. Good on you man!


    If you want some BIG pegs, you could fabricate some extended Fastways by cutting and welding two sets.

    Or spend big bucks and get the pegs off a 690 Rally. They are very nice and very strong, so it might be worth it if you keep breaking the stock ones with the Zip-ty extensions.

    [​IMG]

    Next to a set of Fastways:

    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. Garthe

    Garthe ROCKS ARE YOUR FRIENDS...

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    Arizona
    I'd pick your bike up anyday, well done...:clap
    #13
  14. woods wizard

    woods wizard Been here awhile

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    898
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    Welcome to No.Va...expect delays
    My hats off to you sir...Well done.
    #14
  15. TEZZA

    TEZZA ADV B4 DEM/TED

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    Well done ,there is always some little thing that needs a mod . You have over come some high hurdles and can still smile :Dand get on with it .
    Keep on riding as it dose clear the mind .
    My hat is off to you Silverboy .
    Tezza .:D
    #15
  16. TEZZA

    TEZZA ADV B4 DEM/TED

    Joined:
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    Silverboy if you want some pegs made in one peice i will make them for you if you want .
    It might take a bit of time to get to you as i am in Australia .:cry
    I gather that you are in the USA ????:huh
    I have a freind coming over in November and could get them posted from the States then.:D
    PM me if this is any help.:ear
    Tezza:D
    #16
  17. oldman67

    oldman67 n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2011
    Oddometer:
    6
    That is great what enthusiasm you have. I have a son who has lost his left foot, he rigged a compression release cable to his shifter to pull it up, he can push it down with his prostethic foot. He gave me his Pingle shifter to install on my KLR so when he comes to visit he can ride it. I have yet to install it. Your pictures and story have given me a little insight into what I have to do to install it.
    Thanks for your write up, you rock!!!!:clap
    #17
  18. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    544
    Location:
    Boulder.Colorado


    Take special care to align the piston correctly. It took me two shifter levers due to moving the hole around.
    Also, the bushing in the steel bar is vital. with an oversized hole in the steel bar that was drilled at the outside diameter of a thick spacer washer like piece of metal I found at the hardware store. The shifter was attached through the spacer then larger washers were used to make the fit snug. This allows rotation but not much movement in and out. The piston need to rotate freely forward and backwards, but be solid towards and away from the bike. Without this, as I found out, the piston rod will be much earlier than it already will.
    And, when it bends, just use a rubber hammer and meticulously bend it straight.
    I have mine rebuilt every couple months for $100, it comes back bomber. The seals suck for dirt but are worse putting up with so I can shift.


    Also. An auto clutch and left hand rear brake will make his life much better. I know he can use his right foot but that will mean he will need to put down what is left of the left... This makes many situations harder than they need to be!

    Good luck
    #18
  19. mikeash

    mikeash Been here awhile

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    Jul 3, 2010
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    Idaho
    Very cool that you found a way to keep riding.
    #19
  20. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

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    Boulder.Colorado
    Thanks. Here is a trip from a couple of weeks ago in the desert. The more i ride, the more I realize none of these mods handicap me...

    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=742119
    #20