Mexico by Geezer

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by RexBuck, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. RebelYell

    RebelYell Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2012
    Oddometer:
    725
    Location:
    somerset nj
    Great pics and enjoy reading about your retirement and motorcycle adventures.I someday hope I can ride mexico myself too and Hope I make it to retirement in this god forsaken state and country.I've been to PV mexico and All I can say is its gorgeous,nothing bad about it.I think they feed us alot of propaganda here in the states because if people really woke up and realized and knew how bad and sucky it really was here there would be a max exodus out of this country and the government would be screwed w a big loss of taxes and money and would be left holding the bag like they really should.Anyway enjoy your retirement and keep the pics coming and be safe god bless;):clap
    #21
  2. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Thanks for following along and thanks for the well wishes - I appreciate it.

    PV is a great town and we have vacationed a few times at a small town about an hour north of there - much smaller. To sees other parts of Mexico that aren't quite so tourist oriented is a real treat - wonderful people, wonderful culture and a beutiful country. Find a way to do it - you'll love it.
    #22
  3. EmilianoXR650L

    EmilianoXR650L Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    209
    Location:
    Playa Azul & Zihuatanejo
    Seguiremos pendientes del viaje !!!!!
    #23
  4. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Gracias por siguiente conmigo.
    #24
  5. Parcero

    Parcero Mundial

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    834
    Location:
    Chicago physically, Colombia en mi mente.
    Amen to that. But let's keep it a secret until we can buy our retirement homes down there cheap before the mass exodus causes the prices to go up.

    #25
  6. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Day 7 - January 24

    Short day today as only planning on going to Loreto, so hung around Mulege for awhile. Walked around town; generally pretty nice with fairly well kept houses and some touristy shops/restaurants. Seems to be a Gringo influence in areas of the town.


    Talked to a dirt biker at the hotel - says he's been riding and traveling in the Baja for years. He indicated there used to be a lot of Americans living in Mulege who had built some quite nice houses along the river. Apparently they could keep their boats in the river and motor out to the ocean. However, a hurricane a few years ago caused some massive flooding in the river, wiping many of the houses out and they were never rebuilt. As I was leaving town, noticed there still seemed to be a few houses along there - pretty setting in the palm trees.

    Strangely, the mission/church in Mulege is Misión de Santa Rosalia while the town of Santa Rosalia apparently has associations with Santa Barbara. Man, the infighting between the saints must have been/be terrific. While this was one of the early missions established in the early 1700's, as with many of these buildings along the coast, hurricanes necessitated rebuilding a number of times.

    Ride up to Loreto was spectacular. Beautiful coast line; rugged, somewhat like California but with much quieter surf and crystal clear water. Nice twisty road & good pavement. Quite a number of beaches along that stretch are developed for people to park their motorhomes on the beach & pretty cool. Looked to me like a lot of the motorhomes were parked well below high tide mark but I'm sure they watch the tide tables.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Still pretty dry around here

    [​IMG]

    This shrine is typical along the roadways and there are a lot of them. A lot of effort is placed on honoring the dead in Mexico and these shrines can range from a simple cross to shrines such as this (usually a quite a bit smaller) to massive monuments. I thought this one was particularly nice overlooking the bay. They are almost always well cared for and will many times have fresh flowers.

    [​IMG]

    Stopped at a little community of gringo houses I think is called Concepcion. Have a café there and had some great Huevos Rancheros and good coffee.

    Arrived in Loreto; nice town. Stayed at the Coco Cabañas. Great hotel hidden about 2 blocks from downtown area. Owned by an American and his Mexican wife. Although many Mexican hotels don't have much formality for sign in, I thought Stephen had a cool sign in system; name address and phone in a big registry book, like in the olden days. Nice pool and hot tub. Coffee pot in the room. This was by far the nicest place I've stayed in so far.
    [​IMG]


    Wandering around town and came across "Mikes Bar" - with a name like that, had to stop. One other guy in there turns out he is from Vernon also - lives across the lake from us. Has a septic pumping company. I think he may have been the guy who did the shitty job with ours a few years ago . . . :lol3
    #26
  7. Jick Magger

    Jick Magger Exile on Main Street

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    880
    Location:
    Okanagan Valley BC, Canada/Scottsdale, Arizona
    Hey Rex

    I am following along here, thinking I would catch up on your report before inquiring where in the Valley you are from. Of course found the answer in your last post. I was surprised when you mentioned being from Vernon and got me thinking. Who is this masked man from my town who rides a pirate ship yet is enlightened enough to have a GS. It took a few minutes but the penny dropped. How you doing Steve? Sounds like a great ride. You have no idea how envious am and will follow along on your journey. I follow multiple RR's into Mexico. Have a blast.... Brian J:ear
    #27
  8. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Thanks for that BJ and thanks for following along. I'm doing well and having more fun than a person should be allowed. Will be sitting in one spot for a few days so hopefully will get caught up with this report. Cheers
    #28
  9. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Day 8 - January 25

    Interesting day. Still undecided in the morning whether to stay in Loreto. Was looking forward to seeing San Javier, so decided to set out.

    Heading out of town, realized I had not eaten anything and was hoping to find something on the way. Right at the start of the road to San Javier, pulled into a cool restaurant/bar catering to Gringos. Good breakfast and good atmosphere - busy place.
    [​IMG]

    Looks like you could even get a room

    [​IMG]

    Where I'm headed

    [​IMG]


    First part of road to San Javier is paved and twisty and a lot of fun. Spectacular scenery as it winds up a little canyon. Last third or so is good gravel road. I was expecting to take a long time to get here but but only took 45 minutes including a brief stop.
    [​IMG]


    San Javier is a very cool setting. There is a little town there with a long cobble stone road and the church at the foot. Road lined with shops, etc. I think you can even get a room there.
    [​IMG]<


    [​IMG]

    Beautiful old church; interior well restored and somewhat gaudy but not unusual.
    [​IMG]


    <[​IMG]

    My understanding of the efforts to establish Missions (churches) in the lower Californias was that the Jesuits first tried in La Paz in the late 1600's but were rebuffed by the natives. Were finally able to establish the first Mission in Loreto at the location of the current Misión but this structure has been rebuilt a number of times, being destroyed by hurricanes, etc and bears little resemblance to the original. The second Misión to be established was at Misión San Francisco Javier and since it is inland and protected from the ravages of hurricanes, is still the original building.

    Apparently the Jesuits wanted to establish a whole string of missions each within a day's donkey ride from the next. Got a couple dozen done. The Spanish King suspected the Jesuits were amassing a lot of wealth and eventually kicked them out and that is when the Franciscans took over and started expanding into upper California. There, your history lesson for the day.

    You can see the thickness of the walls by looking at the windows.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    Found the olive tree located well behind the church. Apparently was planted by one of the Jesuit priests at the time the Misión was built making it around 300 years old. I'll probably look pretty gnarly like that long before I get to be that old.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Some of the many gardens around the church

    [​IMG]

    People kept asking me if I was continuing on the road west of San Javier. Said yes and they would say things like; It;s doable; and; Don't worry there are some farmers along there if you need anything. Jeebus! What is this road like?

    Very interesting road and other than the last 10 or 15 km, was quite enjoyable. It basically follows a river bed crossing it dozens of times. There would be a lot of interesting water crossings if trying this in the rainy season. Judging by the size of the boulders and the size of the river bed, that must be one wild ass torrent when it is flooding. The road crosses back and forth and in some cases runs right up the river bed.

    Donkeys, horses and goats wandering around. Some parts of this "river" consisted entirely of boulders like the one in the foreground and it would be a good 100 yards wide.
    [​IMG]



    It appears so dry and arid in that whole area, I don't know how those farmers make it.
    [​IMG]


    Road conditions of this part ranged from washboard to rocky to gravel; wasn't bad. Either washboard or shallow sand. The washboard vibrated a couple of screws loose holding the headlight and windshield on. The sand was ok (I'm not a sand rider) but it was deep enough that the bike was wiggling around if you didn't pay attention. The last chunk (western end) was just annoying. It was very large washboard that went all the way across the road with no smooth shoulders to escape on.

    Here is some of the pretty smooth part and one of the dry water crossings

    [​IMG]

    The rest of the afternoon was consumed heading to La Paz. Hindsight being what it is, it would have made more sense to stop in Ciudad Constitucion for the night and then have a leisurely ride to the La Paz ferry in the morning. As it was, got into La Paz late and started scouting for a hotel. Forgot to note recommendations before I left so was floundering around (this becomes a recurring theme - you'd think somebody would figure this out). Finally wandered into one place and they wanted $150 - jajajajaja. Sent me up three blocks to the Bugambilos which is a big old place with a locked compound for the bike. Suits me fine. Got them down to $50 which was better than 3 times that. Had some great tacos down the street.
    #29
  10. Baja Ho

    Baja Ho Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    895
    Location:
    Central Coast, CA. USA & Cabo San Lucas, Baja Sur
    Thanks for the road pics past San Javier. Will be crossing there on my loop from Cabo in a week or so. Did that road in 06 a few weeks after a storm passed through and yes there were at least twelve creek crossings and you could not tell on some of them where the road continud on the other side, also we came out on Mex1 about twenty miles East from Ciudad Insurgentes, some silt down there. Thanks for posting.
    #30
  11. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Day 9 - January 26

    Rode a total of 25km today.

    Got to the ferry terminal a bit early – it is actually a pretty ride out to the terminal at Pichilingue. Didn’t know what to expect, so gave myself some extra time. Originally planned to get my tickets and then find something to eat. Didn’t quite work out that way.

    For those who may be traveling by this ferry for the first time, here is the process. Upon arrival at the terminal, you immediately go through customs & immigration. Customs is like travelling from another country to Mexico. Apparantly you don’t need the TVIP for your vehicle in Baja but I do think you need to have obtained your Tourist card before you get as far south as La Paz. I knew I was going to need both so had them in hand. You can apparently get them at the Migración office at the terminal. They will check everything thoroughly including verifying the bike’s VIN to the TVIP.


    I didnt affix my TVIP sticker to the winds'hield like they want you to and the customs guy got a bit upset about it and was ready to stick it on. :deal I told him I was worried about it getting stolen as my windscreen disconnects real easy (which it does) and told him the guy at the border said I didn’t have to have it on (well, I kind of made that up) and he finally relented and handed it back. If you don’t turn that sticker back in when you leave, I suspect you aren’t going to get your $400 bond back and therefor don’t want to leave the thing where it can grow legs easily.

    Then went to buy my tickets at the booth just inside Customs. Young girl was slow, wound up charging me the prices for the trip to Mazatlan which is about 270p more. I kept asking her if that was the right price and she finally figured out her error and refunded cash after already processing the higher amount on my Visa. Got around to the terminal (could have bought my ticket there also), went looking for food, found a tienda upstairs and they had some dodgy looking ham and cheese sandwiches on Bimbo bread – which I had along with some cookies and a coffee. So much for lunch.
    Ferry terminal
    [​IMG]


    Here is what I will do differently if I go on this ferry again: Buy the tickets online (I think you can pay for and pick up your tickets at an Oxxo), eat before I show up at the terminal, then, show up at the terminal about an hour and a half or two hours before sailing. In fact as I mentioned, I would have cut my previous day short at Ciudad Constitution and then ridden into La Paz the morning I was sailing – since I really didn’t take any time to see La Paz.

    This ferry is deceptively massive, in essence a truck ferry that can take some passenger vehicles. There are 4 vehicle decks, three of which were for trucks and cargo and were packed and the vehicle deck could probably hold 100 cars but there were only 20 or so. They had me park my bike next to a steel rail, handed me a rope. Left it on the sidestand and tied the left side of the bike to the rail – very secure. They actually load and unload from the same end so, trucks (and cars) at some point have to turn around on the ferry – seems to work well. When you ride on, the passenger vehicle deck is #2 so you ride down in the bowels of the ship to get to the deck – quite an experience compared to the BC and Washington ferries I am used to.
    [​IMG]

    This guy was releasing one of the massive lines tying one corner of the ferry to an anchor buoy and then starts driving the boat alongside the ferry for quite awhile. Couldn't figure out what he was up to

    [​IMG]

    Then this guy hops off the ferry, acting like Mr Big Shot. I guess they use a pilot in and out of La Paz . . . you'd think the Captain would learn how to maneuver after doing this run a gazillion times. Guess it keeps the pilots union happy.
    [​IMG]

    Ferry ride was about 7 hours long. One thing I hadn’t counted on is that they provide a meal as part of the cost of the ticket – it was pretty good. I did not get a cabin and just wandered around between the bar which is comfortable but a bit noisy, the cafeteria which is available after most people have eaten and then outside on the decks. My favorite was the top deck at the back where there are a couple of benches to sit on or just sit on the deck. Great place to relax, watched the Baja recede, watched the sunset, watched the stars and had a snooze. If I was on this boat for a night passage, I think I would just throw my sleeping bag on the deck - it would be great.


    Didn’t get off the ferry until about 10 pm and had no desire to ride into Los Mochis for a room in the dark. Knew there was a hotel in Topolobampo, found that and got a room. Pretty average but I could park right next to my door and they had internet.
    [​IMG]


    Oxxo across the street and went to get a beer but they cut off sales at 10PM – grrrr! Can get a brewed coffee early in the morning though. :clap

    #31
  12. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Thanks for following along Baja Ho. I came out about 15 miles north of Ciudad Insurgentes on Hwy 53. There is also apparently a route that starts north of San Javier and heads north to connect with Hwy 53. Someone told me that he had heard that road was impassable right now - didn't confirm it. Otherwise, that road south and west of San Javier is dry and quite enjoyable (with the exception of that last chunk). Have a good trip and ride safe.
    #32
  13. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Day 10 - January 27

    Had a short ride up to El Fuerte today. Arrived in the late morning to a very bustling town, busloads of students on class fieldtrips and some (mostly Mexican) tourists.

    Parked the bike and went looking for a hotel. Wanted to be downtown this year. Went to four, at three the desks were either closed or not manned so, chose the Hotel la Choza. Right across from the zócalo – reduced the rate to 714p – most expensive room so far and the worst WiFi. Pretty decent place, nice courtyard, nice vaulted ceiling room.

    Front of the hotel blends into the traditional look around the zócalo
    [​IMG]


    Courtyard of the hotel
    [​IMG]

    They must have saved this room just for me

    [​IMG]

    Wandered around downtown, sat in the square and watched people while eating some churro – basicly a long rope of dough is curled around in boiling oil then cut up into pieces and dipped in cinnamon sugar. Hmmmm!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Mexican's many times like to use vivid colors for their buildings

    [​IMG]

    Went up to the “fort” museum – there was originally a fort built here around 1600 (hence the name El Fuerte) but they don’t know where it actually was and the museum is a replica. The Spanish were generally not well received by the natives so the fort helped keep them from getting hacked up in the night by the locals.
    [​IMG]

    Beautiful cactus in front of "the fort"
    [​IMG]

    Downtown area from the top of the fort

    [​IMG]

    Spent some time in the afternoon in the lobby of the hotel with my friend Negra Modelo trying to get some of this report caught up.

    This is the second time I’ve stayed in El Fuerte and it is a very clean, friendly and well looked after town. Towns with a good tourist attraction can be this way. When I was leaving last year I really wanted to spend a bit more time poking around - glad I did come back.

    Got chewed up by some sort of bug while here – little bastard no-seeums were drawing blood on my arms during the day and the next day my legs were a itchy mess. I'll save your eyes the horrors of looking at my body parts and just stick to this description. :yikes
    #33
  14. GoinPostal

    GoinPostal Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    387
    Location:
    Sonoma, CA
    Enjoying your RR. We are crossing the border on Wednesday headed for Copper Canyon and south, (down to Puerto Vallarta) then back up to Mazatlan to cross doing your trip in reverse. How much did the Ferry trip cost? Where did you land in Mexico? We were thinking about Mazatlan, but we are not really set in our plans at this time. Do you know the website for the Ferry tickets? We got our TVIP and Visa online already, God I hate lines and immigration. Keep safe and maybe we'll see you along the way!
    #34
  15. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Thanks for following along Goin. Here is the ferries website http://www.bajaferries.com/ I found it a bit confusing but if you perserveer you can figure it out. I think I paid a total of about 1700p for my bike and myself but I went to Topolobampo which is a shorter and less expensive trip than to Mazatlan. Unless you want to explore the area up around Los Mochis, I think I'd opt for the Mazatlan trip.

    Did not know you could get your Visa online - make sure you in fact have your Tourist Card - you don't want to be caught way down in Mexico without it. I thought you could only get your Tourist Card in person - but maybe not. If you are crossing at Soynita/Lukeville, the Migracion/Banjarcito is about 25km past the border.

    Have a great trip and ride safe.
    #35
  16. GoinPostal

    GoinPostal Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    387
    Location:
    Sonoma, CA
    Thanks for that Info, we'll be watching your RR to see if we may cross paths
    #36
  17. PatdeLery

    PatdeLery Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    32
    Location:
    World and around
    Just found your report ,very interesting to read ,my wife and I are coming from Del Rio Texas across the desert and are now in Durango heading to Mazatlan tomorrow for about a week maybe we wil see you for a beer?Pat and Chris
    #37
  18. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Glad you found it and found it interesting Pat. Thanks for following.

    You are going to love your ride tomorrow - I did that road 3 times last year on my Harley.

    I am trying to get this report caught up. Am currently in Guayabitos playing tourist - will be leaving Monday, likely south. Let me know if you are planning on heading south and we may well cross paths.

    Have fun tomorrow and ride safe.
    #38
  19. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Day 11 - Jan 28

    Wanted to get on the road a little earlier than usual as Garmin was telling me I had about 5 hours to do a little more than 100km to Alamos. Figured it would be a beat up road and I would be sweating a lot, so get at it before the sun takes over.

    Gassed up, refilled the Rotopax and headed out. Quick comment about the Rotopax. This is that red 1 gallon flat gas can you will see in some of my pics mounted on the back luggage rack under the gray bag. With only a 16 litre tank (gives me 325 to 350 km - 200 to 225 mile range), the Rotopax gives me another 50 miles (80 KM). Have not really needed it but have used it once. The thing I like is it gives me peace of mind. On the road from San Felipe to Bahia de LA, I was able to just squeak into the Pemex in Bahia but had I not had the spare gas, I probably would have bought some crappy barrel gas on Hwy 1 to make sure I would make it. Later coming into La Paz, I knew I would need gas soon but when I passed a Pemex, the GPS showed another Pemex 15 km up the road. Needless to say when I arrived there it was closed - replaced by the one 15 km ago. Used my spare gas to get me into La Paz without having to go back 15 km. I know, when you have a chance to get gas or take a pee, do so. You'd think I'd learn.

    Rough pavement out of El Fuerte then turn off to some gravel, past the Miguel Hidalgo Dam.

    Construction site at the dam. Mexican water truck - sorry crappy video but I thought it was a great way to solve a problem.


    Gravel road pretty good all the way - not much elevation change. Lots of small ranches along the way - farmers seem to love herding cattle along the roads. Main mode of transportation seems to be the little 150 or 200cc bikes you see all over the place. Got off track a couple of times which added some miles to the ride but that was ok. Including the detours and some other messing around, was about 4 hours.

    I didn't take any pics along the way but did have my GoPro on for about 3 hours. Here is a highly distilled portion of that. I'm trying to focus on a couple of small towns the road passes through to you an idea what rural Mexico is like. I's quite different than the tourist towns. Couple of shots of cattle. These scenes were quite frequent. This is my first video attempt - took a lot of time figuring out the mechanics and then actually sorting through 3 hours was mind numbing.


    This guy was just going home


    Road got a little more interesting for a while and then dumped me in the back door of Alamos ready to look for a room. Not so fast there Sparky! The place was a madhouse with the entire inner town blocked off to traffic by the local police. Turns out this weekend is part of a big cultural festival and the hotels are pretty well booked up solid.

    Checked about 10 or 12 places and would just get a slow head shake - at least they didn't laugh at me. Quite a number of the hotels were quite nice places and in fact, have not seen as many late model Mercedes, BMWs and Cadillacs with Mexican plates in the total time I have been in Mexico. When you see a bunch of these parked out front, you figure that that hotel may well be slightly out of the price range a travelling biker is looking for. Checked anyhow - no dice.

    Found one place that had a room for 300p - it had hot water . . . got a blank look when I asked if they had Wi-Fi and I probably would have taken it but no parking - that's a no go. It was, ummm somewhat rustic. So, hung around for a bit, had a couple of tacos and moved on to Navojoa for the night.

    Sorry, no pics as I forgot my camera when I went wandering. Had left my bike in a pretty open area but it was still vulnerable to sticky fingers so, didn't want to linger too long. No problems.

    Stayed at the Sicomoro Hotel in Navojoa which I've been at before and has a decent room.
    [​IMG]

    #39
  20. RexBuck

    RexBuck Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,117
    Location:
    Interior BC, Canada
    Day 12 - January 29

    Left Navojoa with no definite plans on where to stop today. Had a route planned out but as soon as I was out of the city I saw a Libre sign and headed off. It wasn’t really a Libre but more just not on the Cuota. This is great farming country that reminds me a lot of California. Lots of variety: Field crops, cotton, grains, vegetables, vine & tree fruits and so on. I love looking at this stuff. And, they are big, very productive farms.

    So, I’m standing on the side of the road to take some pictures and this guy pulls up to see if everything is ok. Speaks pretty good English so start chatting. Turns out Javier rides an 1100 GS, is the Presidente of the local Sanuaro Moto Club and has traveled all over the western states and into Canada. In his spare time he is a farmer and head of a large Co-op in the area. Super nice guy. Gives me a hat from his club then gives me a beer holder – the only other place I’ve seen these is in Australia and the Aussies call them stubbie holders. Very passionate about farming and very passionate about motorcycles. A great guy. Thanks Javier. :thumb
    [​IMG]

    Javier's hat

    [​IMG]

    Carried on wandering around. Cruising down a long straight stretch (well that is dumb – everything in this area are long straight stretches) and I notice a pickup parked on the side of the road a long ways away. As I get closer, I realize it is black and white of the State Police. Ah crap! I’m only going about 100kph but I know the speed limits are all less than that. :deal As I approach this cop starts walking across the road. This is a large cop, along the lines of Jackie Gleason in Smokey and the Bandit. Even had the same sunglasses. Anyhow he waves me to stop and now I’m going to get my first experience with a Mexican shakedown. He walks over, gives me a hearty Buenos Dias, sticks out his hand, I shake it, he says it’s a beautiful day and then says “go.” I’m saying to myself WTF just happened there? Guess another member of the local welcoming committee. I’m having a great day that just gets better.

    Starting to head back down the highway and am thinking will just pack it in early in Los Mochis. Came across the side road I had originally planned that would take me through a bunch more farmland. This was great. I meandered around these fields for miles following the main irrigation ditch – man they take good advantage of the irrigation water here. This went on for a couple of hours – really didn’t see anyone else out here except in a couple of small towns I went through.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Many crossings over side channels
    [​IMG]


    Came around one corner and there was a tractor with a tank trailer parked in the road. As I approached I noticed this guy laying on the road under it in the shade having a siesta. Raises his head up and waves. I did’t think it appropriate stopping for a pic so you’ll have to formulate that image in your mind.

    Eventually my route took me out of the farm land and headed me across some, shall we say, less improved land. The GPS was now really screwed up and there was no roads on the route it wanted me to take. So, I just stuck to roads that seemed to somewhat parallel the GPS’s purple line and it worked out fine. After quite awhile the road started to deteriorate a lot which reminded me of the many roads I have found at home like that. You know, the ones on the map but eventually just stop.
    [​IMG]


    After about 30 km of this stuff, I finally hit a paved road and it's quite nice whipping along this at a decent speed – when all of a sudden I'm rounding a corner and the road drops off. I realize I’m scooting down this concrete slab which is the side of a giant water crossing :yikes. . . with no water in it but it is at least a kilometer wide and the base is chunky concrete. Apparently the river must back up enough to the dyke on my left that is holding the lake in and you’d have a water trek.

    It seems this dam arrangement is the source most, if not all the irrigation water I saw in the hundreds of miles of ditches and canals. Impressive operation.
    [​IMG]

    Waiting for a train? :doh

    [​IMG]</o:p>

    Decided not to stay in San Blas (not the seaside tourist town) nearby and headed down to Los Mochis which wasn’t far away - more farming along the way
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Staying at the Hotel Las Fuentes on the main drag into town. Decent place, secure parking and OK WiFi. I’m happy. Crappy restaurant though. Go across the street to the Oxxo to buy a couple of beers . . . no, no, beer sales stop at 4:00 :kboom
    #40