Michigan Helmet Laws - A Detailed Look Into a Newly Helmetless State

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Anywhereness, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    Not really.:rofl I'm still trying to understand why somebody can be charged with DUI here when they're on a bicycle/skateboard in a park and not causing a disturbance or a traffic nuisance, OR if they're passed out in their legally-parked car with the engine off and no keys in the ignition. 'Makes no sense to me. Who are they supposed to be a danger to besides themselves?
  2. DOGSROOT

    DOGSROOT OUTSIDE

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    You guys caved pretty quickly to the National Minimum Drinking Age Act, which I hold to be a

    far more egregious violation of US citizens rights/freedoms than a helmet law.





    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._history_of_alcohol_minimum_purchase_age_by_state



    Here's a blurb from a group of college presidents that is fighting for your right to party:


    Should New Hampshire lower the drinking age?


    Congress passed the National Minimum Drinking Age Act in 1984, which imposed a 10 percent reduction in federal
    highway funds on any state setting its drinking age lower than 21.

    The push to lower the drinking age gained momentum with the 2008 launch of the Amethyst Initiative,
    a national coalition of college presidents.

    According to the group's website:

    -Twenty-one is not working

    -A culture of dangerous, clandestine “binge-drinking”—often conducted off-campus—has developed.

    -Alcohol education that mandates abstinence as the only legal option has not resulted in significant constructive behavioral change among our students.

    -Adults under 21 are deemed capable of voting, signing contracts, serving on juries and enlisting in the military, but are told they are not mature enough to have a beer.




    DISCLAIMER: NH is one of my favourite states, after intoxication. :1drink
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  3. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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  4. DOGSROOT

    DOGSROOT OUTSIDE

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    Yeah.

    Six years of just drinking age laws.

    Not quite as *Free* as advertised. :rofl

    Still one of the best states though.




    New Hampshire ratified the 26th Amendment May 13, 1971.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twenty...States_Constitution#Proposal_and_ratification

    Here's their drinking age history.

    New Hampshire:

    Post-Prohibition(after 1933) 21
    Lowered to 18 in 1973
    Raised to 20 in 1979
    Raised to 21 in 1985

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._history_of_alcohol_minimum_purchase_age_by_state





    A lot of my American friends were bemused by how horrified I, a non-citizen, was w/ the fact that you had

    conscription during Vietnam of voting adults who were forbidden by law to drink.


    (I gotta admit that I was unaware that the drinking age was 21 since prohibition in most states...)


    Time to get my ass outta bed for a beer and chocolate cake breakfast! :1drink
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  5. Chip Seal

    Chip Seal Long timer

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    Someone has to pay for all that winter road salt. Might as well be the Feds! :lol3
  6. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    I grew up in Vermont, drinking age was 21, but we could drive 15 miles to New York and buy booze when we were 18

    I went to college in NY where the drinking age was 18, then out of college and back in Vermont, I turned 21, they lowered the drinking age to 18. soon after, I moved to NH

    notice NH raised the drinking age to 20 only 6 years after they lowered it, there were too many 18 & 19 year old alcohol related fatalites in those years and NH raised it on their own before the federal mandate, hardly caving

    I'm torn between liking NH or VT better, I like NH politics, but in Vermont, its legal to pass on double yellows and no permit required for concealed carry
  7. DOGSROOT

    DOGSROOT OUTSIDE

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    Yeah, you're right about the "caving" .

    I'll retract that.

    Was mostly just baiting you a bit. :lol3

    Like bear-baiting at the dump, it can backfire!!!:norton

    I didn't want to hijack the thread away from helmet laws.

    My intent was more to point out that there are laws that are "well-intentioned" and commonly accepted by

    Americans, that are nonetheless depriving citizens of their rights in the name of protecting them

    from themselves.

    Motorcyclists get all bent outta shape about the helmet laws, and overlook plenty of others.

    I'm too busy riding to give a flying f*ck about helmet laws.

    Rode a couple of hours through NM helmet free just for the hell of it.

    If I arrive somewhere and discover I forgot to do up my helmet, I feel sick about it.
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  8. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    I like having my choice, while 90% of the time I wear a helmet, I do it for comfort, not protection
  9. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    You're welcome.

    PhilB
  10. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    Nice for a spot of sense to appear. Thanks.

    PhilB
  11. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    +1! This!

    PhilB
  12. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    New Hampshire does not require seatbelts for adults. And yes, seatbelt laws are equally coercive and therefore unethical, and some of us haven't lost sight of that.

    PhilB
  13. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    I do. I think it's a great option, but I think mandating ANYTHING is a bad thing, unless (and ONLY unless) that thing can be proven to violate the rights of some person other than the person doing or having it.

    PhilB
  14. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    Driving drunk (or on the phone, for that matter) endangers OTHER people. THAT is the moral difference that determines whether an act may ethically be outlawed or not. Drugs, gambling, and prostitution are good examples of other things that shouldn't be illegal, and which outlawing them has done us no good -- while fighting them with coercion has done us much harm.

    PhilB
  15. PhilB

    PhilB Long timer

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    +1. It amazes me that people cannot make that simple logical connection. If you claim the right to decide what level of safety another person must take, don't be a bit surprised if someone else claims the same right over you.

    PhilB
  16. 1200gsceej

    1200gsceej Long timer

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    I agree, except ....
    As a culture, we just don't let people die, regardless of the fact that they were "making their own choices." So, they do not suffer the ultimate consequence - dying. Someone must bear the cost of their medical treatments (the insurance company, assuming the victim has any/enough - through other ratepayers). And whether alive or dead, the family suffers and that can be a direct (i.e. welfare) or indirect drain on other citizens.
    So should I be forced to foot my portion of the money that gets spent on the person who is seriously injured? Isn't that a violation of my rights?

    I think it is a more difficult problem.
    -ceej

  17. InlineSkate

    InlineSkate Adventurer

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    Except your rates are largely based on your own health and decisions not those of someone else.

    For example motorcycle riders in general get charged higher premiums as do smokers and overweight individuals.

    Either way even if this was the case most would rather pay a little more in the long run than be coddled and told what they can and can't do.
  18. ktmgeoff

    ktmgeoff Remember it's not a race!

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    In some States though he'd have gone through the windscreen......:lol3
  19. aterry1067

    aterry1067 Been here awhile

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    Sooooooooo if ATGATT with FF helmet, armored jacket, pants, gloves, and boots, became mandatory law, do you think the insurance companies would be so kind as to lower you premiums?
  20. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    There is the problem right there. You feel that your "culture" should be imposed on others.


    Keep your idea of culture and its laws that you make to impose said culture the hell away from my body. (FUCK OFF :D)

    And stop with the cost argument already. It is so absolutely minuscule that it does not even deserve a mention in these threads. It is just parroted political crap!

    People should have the right to asses the risk and take whatever measures to mitigate that risk in the manner THEY see fit.