Michnus & Elsebie Piki-Piki Around the World.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by michnus, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    There is still a train running from Panama city to Colon and back everyday. It is still an old style coach and it run all along the canal. Somewhat expensive but absolutely worth. You get taken back into time. And it is a trip we would recommend when in Panama.

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  2. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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  3. joenuclear

    joenuclear Long timer

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    Thank you! Wonderful!!!
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  4. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    Panama city is everything you imagined it would be as the place where corporates and shady politicians get away with tax evasion and such shit. Huge high rises, expensive apartments. But as whole normal people just go their way with their normal lives.

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    Ice is always in huge demand especially the small street front shops and the fishermen's boats.

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    Girl had a huge party near the pier, they invited us to the party as we passed by. Not wanting to take over her party we respectfully declined :lol3
  5. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried

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    Time for an update? Michnus must have stumbled upon a remote beer reserve
    :drink
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  6. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

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    Boy, did they got off easy, evidently they had know idea who they were dealing with!
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  7. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    always great photos buddy... good to know your still out there and relaxing your way around the world
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  8. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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  9. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    If you are an engineering nut or even just someone who appreciate humankind's sacrifices and engineering feats the Panama canal is an absolute must visit when there. It is in short one mind bending incredible thing to see.

    The Miraflores locks just outside Panama city is a good place to go see the ships pass through the locks. You can call the office at the locks and they are so nice as to give exact times ships will pass through the locks. There is a huge new building with three viewing decks for people to see the massive ships.

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    The "normal" big ships use the old locks and the mega monster ships thew new canal in the background to the left of this photo under the new suspension bridge.

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    It is not a time consuming affair, these boys and girls push those big ships through the locks at speed, the next is waiting to blow a few mega bars of Dollars to get to their destination. They also have small sailboats in the same locks, just not sure what they pay.

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    In the hour we stood there these ships and the massive one in the background in the canal passed through the locks.

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    The size of all this engineering is just mindblowing shit!
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  10. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    Some info from the Huff:
    1. The Panama Canal couldn’t be built the same way as the Suez Canal, and nobody thought of that well, at least nobody tried to stop France from attempting to build it that way for 10 years. Ferdinand de Lesseps, the French diplomat who led the development of the Suez Canal, worked on the Panama Canal from 1879 to 1889. He wanted to build a canal at sea level and avoid the use of locks, which allow ships to pass between different water levels. He had his workers dig into the land, just as they did with the Suez Canal. The trouble was, Panama’s climate is different: it has a dry season and a rainy season, and every rainy season, all the land they’d dug out would flow right back into the canal. Très frustrant. It wasn’t until 1905, after extensive engineering studies, that the US settled on building the locks.

    2. Mosquitos very nearly prevented its existence. The other reason that de Lesseps failed was that malaria and yellow fever spread tragically and relentlessly through his workers via mosquito — but they didn’t know that. Thankfully, by 1904, 15 years after de Lesseps had left, the little bloodsucking culprits were found out, and countermeasures against the mosquito population made the Canal possible.

    3. The Panama Canal is politically neutral. Since the Torrijos-Carter treaty in 1977, the Canal has been officially and permanently neutral, providing service to ships of all nations. This means that if any nation were to attempt to seize the Canal, every other nation in the world would have a problem with it. Pretty smart. Panama itself has no military, nor do they need one in order to protect the Canal.

    4. The Panamanian government does not run the canal. The Panama Canal has its own board of directors who manage its operation and the allocation of the billions of dollars it generates each year. (A good chunk goes to the Panamanian government.)

    5. Giant ships are built specifically to fit through the canal — the technical term is “Panamax.” The Panama Canal Authority openly publishes the maximum allowable dimensions for ships, which is evident when you see one pass through a lock — they only spare what appears to be few feet on either side of the massive vessels. Ships that are too large for the Canal are referred to as “post-Panamax.”

    6. Trucks keep passing ships from hitting the sides of the locks. Even those Panamax ships move through the canal propelled by their own engines, so in order to keep them from grazing the sides of the locks, trucks are cabled to the front, back and sides of the ships. The trucks move forward and back on lock-side tracks to keep the cables taut and the ships in the middle of the locks.

    7. The Panama Canal is expanding, and even deeper, even wider post-expansion plans are already being made. “Cause baby there ain’t no river wide enough, to keep me from getting to you, babe.” The $5.2 billion Panama Canal Expansion Program began in 2007 and will allow the passage of larger ships (ships which adhere to the “New Panamax” standards). The widened Panama Canal will still be smaller than some of the world’s largest container ships, so the Canal will likely be expanded again within a few years of the expansion’s completion. Bonus fact from my tour guide: the new lock system will have sliding, not swinging, gates.

    8. You can walk across the gates. When those lock gates swing closed, people go marching right across them.

    9. East is west and west is east in the Canal. Seriously. Due to the curvature of the isthmus, one must travel west to get to the Atlantic Ocean, and east to get to the Pacific side. That’s messed right up.

    10. The Panama Canal was Spain’s idea. Though it was first attempted by the French, completed by the Americans and is now controlled by Panama, the canal was actually the brainchild of King Charles V of Spain in the early 1500’s, and he even began a study of the feasibility of the project which would begin 350 or so years later. Today, a bust of Charles V stands in Panama City’s Casco Viejo (“Old Town”) in commemoration of his vision.

    11. The United States uses the canal the most
    , followed by China, Japan, Chile and North Korea.

    12. The fastest transit was completed in 2 hours 41 minutes by the U.S. Navy’s Hydrofoil Pegasus in 1979.

    13. In 1963 fluorescent lighting was installed, allowing the canal to begin operating 24 hours a day.

    14 Nearly 20,000 French and 6,000 American workers died during the completion of the Panama Canal.

    15 Between 12,000 and 15,000 ships cross the Panama Canal every year – about 40 a day.

    16. The cost of moving a ship through the Panama Canal has tripled over the past five years to around $450,000 per passage for a vessel carrying 4,500 containers. With the opening of the Panama Canal expansion in June, it was to be expected that the waterway would shatter all sorts of cargo volume records, but with the canal’s added capacity one figure in particular stands out: $829,468.
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  11. goodcat

    goodcat Changing latitudes, altitudes and attitudes

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    Oh my, you really have become a source of information. :D

    Keep it up.... I like it :nod
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  12. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    Google makes it so easy nowadays. Have to add some educaaation :lol3
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  13. SuperSonicRocketship

    SuperSonicRocketship 50 Nations and Counting

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    Facts maketh the ride report
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  14. Saralou

    Saralou Worldwide Rider

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    If you get a chance ride past the Gatun Lock to the San Lorenzo Fort.


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  15. dano619

    dano619 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the Panama Canal info.......way cool!!
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  16. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

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    Great info' and pic's!

    Had a few Balboa's when you wrote "North" Korea :imaposer
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  17. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

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    About fifteen years ago I bought an old trials bike from a guy who worked at the RMC cement plant in Davenport ,California. He gave me tour while I was there, he claimed that a good portion of the cement that built the Panama Canal was pruduced at this plant. It is a long boat ride from Santa Cruz, California to Panama.

    In 2005 the Mexican company Cemex bought RMC for 8 billion, then closed the plant in 2010
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  18. 10ecjed

    10ecjed Been here awhile

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    I had no idea it cost that much to go through the canal. Good info. The pics are great as always. Thanks again. And again and again. I'm sure there will be a lot more thanks coming in future. This couch potato like your thread a lot. Damon i got to stop working and fix my bike so I can get out and ride.
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  19. ADVer

    ADVer Been here awhile

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  20. michnus

    michnus Lucky bastard

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    We missed it! Had so much running around to do with the shipping just completely missed it. Have to wait for the next time :D
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