Minimalist Touring Thread (250cc and under)

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by SIKLR250, Feb 2, 2007.

  1. The Cameraman

    The Cameraman Been here awhile

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    She scrubs up well does our Lois!
  2. Earthscape

    Earthscape Have ya got a helmut?

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    I'm loving all the action on this thread lately. Keep it coming - stories and pics of bikes, gear, camping, rides, packing etc. It's all good stuff.

    For a long time I was frustrated with the amount of space casual footware takes up when packing. I got a pair of these, and they are great. I wouldn't recommend a day long hike with them, but for around a camp site, they work very well, and are very easy to pack. I think they may be getting harder to find though.

    http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/08/timberlands-folding-shoes-zip-up-tight/
  3. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    LOL - those are pretty nice. When I back pack, I've been carrying something like these for around camp...

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    I just bought a pair of those, and you're right - they're pretty limited in sizes and color.
  4. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Just look around, LL bean sells something like that.

    Back when I was able to take month long rides, gear was more limited.
    I took what was on my back, plus one change, a small tent, and a big sleeping bag that I slept on top of most of the time.
    I also took some tools for the bike, wire tied spare cables to the ones in place, some spare bulbs, and loads of money in cash and travelers checks.
    This was pre gps, pre cell phone, pre Ipod, pre digital camera's and portable computers were the size of a big piece of luggage and weighed 50 pounds. You could not mac money, Western Union was the only way to get money.

    I piled stuff on the back of the bike, and had a small tank bag for maps, 110 camera, change, odds and ends.
    I never carried any food or a way to cook food, I ate on the road, and I used campgrounds, which had laundry, showers, a pool and a store. Average price was about $8.00 for a tent site.

    Sometimes I would meet people at the campground and run out for things like steaks and beer to cook over a fire.
    People would often offer me food and drink.

    You can travel very light that way, I did not even have rain gear, as it was summer.
    It does get cold in places, and I wore all the clothes I had and stuffed plastic bags under my shirt a few times.

    I can go without food for a while without any problem, and that was never an issue in the more remote spots.
    Crossing the Mojave in July, I broke down and got a canteen in Barstow, and it came in handy (for other people) at the Grand Canyon where people were passed out from the heat going back up.
    That was a tough walk up, and I had filled the Barstow canteen with Gatorade and water, and gave it to the ranger who was dealing with heat stroke people.

    After a nice lesurly day walking down and up (1 mile down, 5 mile walk one way) I found I had a flat front tire on my bike. Rode it to the campground and fixed it the next day. What a view of the sky out there!
    I still have that canteen...

    I left very light, and figured I could buy something I might need if I had to.
    I learned that on a trip to Florida where I did not even bring a tent. You can not camp in Florida without a tent, the bugs are crazy. After the first night, I went to Sears and got a small tent.

    From what I read here, most people take way too much stuff.
  5. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    Its entirely possible these days to be able to carry a complete kit in 25 pounds or less. That would include a couple of clothing changes, the items needed to stay warm and dry, a chair, food and water. Minimalist backpacking works perfectly with minimalist touring. There's really no need to sacrifice anything other than a little money if you're doing it right.
  6. SAPB

    SAPB Long timer

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    I knew a guy who said he saved shirts, underwear, socks, ect. instead of throwing them out. Pack it up for the trip, and throw away every day, making room for packing trinkets along the way. Many ways of doing it. I did one trip, and forgot to bring a clean shirt for every day, but bought one along the way, and washed the that day one at night, and if it wasn't dry in the morning clip it to the bike somewhere, and it will be dry in no time, though not while raining..............If it's hot, put a wet shirt on under your mesh jacket, instant AC.
  7. ALinUTAH

    ALinUTAH Been here awhile

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  8. Jon

    Jon Adventurer

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    Got to spend some time chatting with her as well one on one. Very entertaining!
  9. Scott_PDX

    Scott_PDX Leisure Engineer

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    Also check out the Big Agnes Fly Creek 2. I went to REI and looked at all the packed tents in their storage area and picked out the ones that had the smallest stuff sack. That was one of the smallest. The lighter the tent though, the flimsier the material. Worked great in a two week trip to Utah last summer, but I feel like I need to "Baby it" (Probabably not a bad thing).
  10. Leo.G

    Leo.G Is still learning

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    Hey!

    Here's a little photo of my last trip, last weekend..

    [​IMG]

    Greetings!
  11. carloscyclecare

    carloscyclecare Been here awhile

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  12. carloscyclecare

    carloscyclecare Been here awhile

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    The XR200 does well in cruising speed on the road. Max out the rpm and vibration will take it's toll on you, this is most particularly a problem for me as I have tendonitis. Wrapping foam on the grips does help though.
  13. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

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    Is that a 125?
  14. Pete-NZ

    Pete-NZ Long timer

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    Honda XR250 Tornado , DOHC air cooled motor..
    Same motor as in the New XRE 300 , CB250R & bored out in the
    CB300R...

    great wee bikes.......
    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
  15. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

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    Nice, wish they were available here.
  16. carloscyclecare

    carloscyclecare Been here awhile

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    That's a nice bike. What tires are you using?
  17. carloscyclecare

    carloscyclecare Been here awhile

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    Usually just sleep out though...
    [​IMG]



    This is just beautiful! Is that some kind of deep pit behind you? :eek1
  18. Pete-NZ

    Pete-NZ Long timer

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    Shinko 705 front , rear...

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    ewagman likes this.
  19. UtahFox

    UtahFox Been here awhile

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    You know, I'm not sure how deep that one is. They're often filled with water, and we never got any Sun in that alcove, you couldn't see the bottom. Wouldn't want to fall in either way, it can be pretty hard getting out of them...

    [​IMG]

    This one is considerably more 'user friendly' :)

    [​IMG]
  20. GearDrivenCam

    GearDrivenCam Long timer

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    Good point regarding the "what I can do without" part.

    I've refined my setup over the past couple of years - getting rid of stuff that simply doesn't work for me - while experimenting with other gear. Over time - you realize there are certain items you just can't live without and they become a mainstay in your setup. Obviously, what I can't live without is likely different from what others can't live without.

    With my CBR125R - just like my other bikes - the focus for me is a great night's sleep while camping (I refuse to stay in motels). I've tried many variations. The one that consistently allows me to sleep like I am at home involves....

    1) A camp-time roll-a-cot (only 10 lbs) with my Nemo Cosmo Air insulated mattress (packs small, is insulated, and the built-in foot pump allows me to inflate it in about 30 seconds) on top. And a thick, comfy, warm sleeping bag on top of the mattress. The cot allows me to place my helmet and other gear underneath it - to save space in the tent. And it is a real treat to get dressed while sitting on the edge of the cot - like a bed - in the morning. I often find myself over-sleeping with this setup - because it is just so damn comfortable and cozy - I don't want to get up. And it is always great to face another day of riding when you feel so fresh and rested.

    2) A Nemo Moki single-walled tent. Quick to set up. Lightweight. Completely waterproof. Packs down very small. And I never ever have to fiddle around with a tent fly again (or lose it) - not to mention the extra time it takes to drape it over the tent and peg it down.

    3) Ortlieb dry tailbag and saddles. I wish I would have purchased these the first time around. Now I never have to put on rain covers ever again. All my gear stays dry all the time. I'll never go back.

    4) A waterproof Kriega US20 tankbag that I plan to try out this summer. However, the Icon Urban Tankbag has many pockets, holds all my maps and little items, and easily carries two large drinks and food for the day.

    5) Ortlieb saddles that carry extra clothes, chain wax, tools, sandals, mp3 player with speakers, toiletry travel bag, and various other essentials. That's everything I need.

    You can read about my recent trip here:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=813500&highlight=nanabijou

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