Minimalist Touring Thread (250cc and under)

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by SIKLR250, Feb 2, 2007.

  1. Pete-NZ

    Pete-NZ Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    903
    XR125..........CTX125 farm bike version...
  2. snare

    snare sittin and breathin

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    713
    Location:
    exactly where I choose
    I am an unabashed lifelong minimalist.
    In addition to moto exploring I backpack,
    practice and teach primitive skills, campcraft, self defense and emergency care (former urban-wilderness paramedic).

    I used to ride a DR350 but am currently
    daily driving a Super Sherpa and I love it ! Just rolled over 17k miles.

    For minimalist exploring throughout the southern Highlands I use a hammock set up.
    My 11' gathered end hammock, structural ridgeline, whoopie slings /tree straps suspension ( soon trying out UCRs), underquilt and separate bug net are all DIY.
    I modded a very lightweight, inexpensive down sleeping bag in to a top quilt.

    With all of the above and a tarp my shelter and sleeping gear totals about 4 pounds and packs down really small.

    The Sherpa (and I) appreciate the lighter load and it helps keep my fuel mileage between 75-90 mpg.
  3. zeeko

    zeeko shiver me timbers

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    63
    Location:
    Kata, Phuket, Thailand
    Nice! I also roll with a hammock setup and people are always questioning its comfort level for sleeping. I have an Eagles Nest, which is tiny, coupled with some rock climbing accessory cord (4mm I think) and then run a line above the hammock with a tent rain fly draped over if necessary. String up the hammock tight, throw in a shorty inflatable thermarest, and I find it to be very comfortable and practical....if you have trees. I have also resorted to using camalots (rock climbing gear) to set it up off of rocks. A friend has a Hennessy hammock which looks pretty slick as well with it's integrated mosquito net and rain fly.
    That being said, the ground has never failed me!:freaky
  4. 8lives

    8lives Dharma Bum

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,026
    Location:
    Shasta County,Calif
    Thanks Snare,good ideas and cool link.
  5. Jaseun

    Jaseun Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2007
    Oddometer:
    368
    Location:
    Annapolis, Maryland USA
    I know they sell that bike in Australia, probably New Zealand too. They're called AG bikes or Agriculture bikes. Usually have a bunch of brush guards and racks. Dual side stands, left and right side, center stands and a clutch lock. Allows you to keep bike in gear and hop off to open and close paddock gates. Yamaha has one too, think it's call the bushman or something like that.

  6. klous-1

    klous-1 Man on a bike

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    219
  7. =SUTTO=

    =SUTTO= Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    35
    Location:
    Newcastle, Australia
    Nailed it on the head there mate, good reliable bike all round, easy to maintain and great to learn and gain new skills on.



    CTX200
    [​IMG]
  8. snare

    snare sittin and breathin

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    713
    Location:
    exactly where I choose
    You are welcome !

    Yes. I actually sleep at home on a thin mat on the floor...but there are no rocks or roots and my floor is flat :D

    It is steep and very forested here where i am. It is difficult enough finding any flat spot let alone a comfortable one. Hammocks just make sense here. And many of the small, cottage hammock gear vendors are from this area. Your ENO is from a company right here in Asheville, NC.

    If you haven't tried a decent, well set-up hammock,find a person or attend a 'hang' and try em out. Hangs are often organized on hammockforums.net
  9. CMS

    CMS Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    332
    Location:
    Southern,OHIO
    Mine [08] had 900 miles when purchased. Now has 6k, drive to work and use as a mini tourer, [Givi 660 Windshield,and 30L Top Case, Tourmaster side bags, works great. Also had local shop mod the seat for more comfort, gets great mileage and I enjoy the trips. CMS
  10. Leo.G

    Leo.G Is still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    432
    Location:
    Marcos Juárez, Córdoba, Argentina
    Nice trip on such a small bike (small for the normal standards)

    Right now I'm continuing with the process of making my Tornado a little more "tourable". In December/January (Summer holidays here in the south hemisphere) I made a rear rack with a relative, and I put on some velcro straps down the seat in order to hold a sheep skin that I cured some time before that..
    Now that we are in July (Winter holidays), I ordered a digital tachometer, and a windshield. I'm also working in a bashplate (keeping the stock one) I think it's going to be made out of 3 steel, nickel or the metal I can get, 'cause it is just for stopping the rocks that can hit the lower part of the engine... And last but not least, I'm thinking of adding a tool tube in the place where the little box is (the same on the old XRs, NXs, etc)

    Pics later! eheh!
  11. OBryan

    OBryan Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    South Central Mo
    Niiiiiiice... I find mine to be a great little short touring bike.. Love mine but I gotta do something about that seat also.. A couple hours and I'm more then ready for time off it..Got some leather saddle bags and for the top came up with a wire basket out of old hardware store...Works great.. Took the pad off the sissy bar, cut a row out underneath the basket and slid it on.. Just some zip ties to keep it from bouncing plus a small cargo net and I am good to pack up.. Hears a picture from last fall.. Out on what at the time was a possible planned 2 night camping trip to watch vintage moto-cross. Cut it a day short with storms moving in but had a great time and had it averaging around 65 mpg.
    [​IMG]
  12. klous-1

    klous-1 Man on a bike

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    219
    Nice! The Tornado was really popular down those parts and I sometimes wished I'd had the cash to get the extra hp myself!

    I'd put my tool tube on the front as you can see, just to move a bit of weight forward and low down, but it's not much weight.

    I cased both bikes and never made a mark on the motor so haven't ever felt the need for the bash plate.....but I use engine bars to protect the pedals....

    A wind-shield will sure help in Patagonia!! As might a set of hot grips actually, maybe something to look into? Will keep an eye out for pics, suerte!
  13. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice In Garrison.

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,713
    Location:
    Roanoke Valley, Virginia
    I've decidied the little dr (DR200se) is the right bike for a North American tirp ( for about 7 months or so).

    It takes the seat height of a 2011+ G650GS (31.5" BMW vs 31.9")

    It takes the ground clearance of the Mighty DR (10.4" vs 10.2")

    It comes close to the range of the KLR650. close to 300 miles under the best of conditions.

    It is 88lbs lighter than the Mighty DR.

    It actually has better fuel economy than the NC700X.

    It has the 21" tire of the KLR650 and the Mighty DR.

    It has the same air cooled very reliable engine of the Mighty DR.

    It's $2,200 cheaper than the Mighty DR.

    Unlike the other bikes:
    No POS battery from the G650GS, or expensive maintenance, engine guards, or hard parts to find.

    NO T-bob/ 685 oil burning kit. Granted, the 09+ KLR are much better.

    No $300 gas tank the Mighty DR needs.

    No $250 seat that the Mighty DR Needs. I'll just put my sleeping bag and tarp on the seat for better comfort and more commanding views.

    No 366lb-472lbs bike to push into the tree line or pick up after being tired and such.

    __
    What do I have to give up?
    Top end speed of 100+mph. Will not miss it.


    Riding on Interstates. From the research I've done, From VA into FL and then pushing west into N.M., there are plenty of highways (55mph-60mph) zones {but I plan on avoiding these also!} for me to take advantage of.
    And if I do need to get on one, I can pick a time when there is less traffic.

    Hell, the ALCAN highway in Canda is 100kph. top speed. No problem. :deal

    I've read through Jan 2010 to August 2011 of the DR200se forum, and I feel like I could ride on a stock bike! What other bike from the list I just mintioned could do this?
    I come from a bicycle back ground and ride quite a bit on a really small thin seat. Plus, like I typed, I'll put plenty of cushion on the bike with my Recon 5 sleeping bag.
    I actually plan on taking physical training breaks a couple of times a day and doing Cross Fit. How's that for "stretching your legs."

    sure, a wind shield would be fine, but I plan on crusing at a top speed of 45 mph. :evil
    Sure, at 5'-8" tall, the ergos will be a little cramped. but again, All I have to do is stop the bike and do a quick 10 min bout of PT. Easy Ride.
    Sure, the engine life is well below 50,000 miles, but the bike is for a 7 month adventure, and then to retire in the stable as a commutter. Zombies should be here well before 50,000 miles.

    Bungie cords all the way.
  14. SAPB

    SAPB Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,803
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    Good plan. I always research before hand. I hate when I buy something, only to find it's not what I thought it would be. Then sell for a loss, and move on. Have a safe trip!
  15. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    105,153
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest

    All good except for the bungie cords. You'll lose your gear and put an eye out. Use nylon straps available very cheaply at the hardware store instead.
  16. sendler

    sendler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    851
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY USA
  17. 50short

    50short Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    53
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    This little machine will do it all...albeit slowly.:D After many years of adventure touring on big displacement GSAs and KLRs, I've decided to get back to my roots. Minimalist touring (at 100MPGs) on a 1970 CT90. Picked up a minty 1970 a couple months ago with 2,000 original miles for $650. After commuting 40/day on it I'm hooked! I'd never considered limiting myself to 40MPH roads, but given the crazy mileage, stupid simplicity, huge capability, and fun factor, I'm going to give weekend camping trips a go! I'm thinking my bicycling tent, mini stove and cook kit, warm weather sleeping bag, food and clothing will fit perfectly on the front and back racks. I'll still have enough room for the 1892 Colt 38 too.

    Anybody have tips for a good trail tool kit for this bike? What parts like to break on the trail? How many miles will a well maintained CT engine go?

    See you guys on the trail! Next stop,'Aerostich rally.
  18. SAPB

    SAPB Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,803
    Location:
    Rhode Island
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=262998
  19. Te Hopo

    Te Hopo AKA Deanohit

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,181
    Location:
    Back home in Picton, New Zealand
    I haven't got anything to add beyond saying that that sounds like a heck of a lot of fun, I'm sure you could fit a camera in your kit for a few pics right? :clap
  20. tshelver

    tshelver Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    577
    Location:
    Beween here (SE Asia) and there (NH/VT)
    I don't have any experience with the older CT, but have quite a bit with the modern variants, on and offroad.
    If you are going to do rough roads loaded, a few spare spokes could be useful, I've broken a few.
    Consider carrying basic items like a sparkplug (and wrench).

    Weight distribution seems to be more to the back, so consider loading heavier items up front, or between your legs like the locals do here. :-)
    Fuel: 100 mpg is good, but considering the limited tank capacity, you may need a bit extra if venturing some of the more remote places.

    Toolkit: the link above is very good. I started with a basic toolkit from one of the vendors (Cruztools in my case) and then modified from there. A good idea is to use the toolkit to perform basic maintenance and repair jobs (including changing a tube) before you leave.

    Be selective of where and how you ride: these have been ridden around the world and on longer 3rd world trips by several people, but the bike is 40 years old and not as strongly built as some other small capacity machines, one reason why I bought a YBR125G instead of a modern CT.
    Also the wheels are a bit smaller than the typical dirt bike, making for a more punishing ride on the rough stuff.
    They can go almost anywhere though, easier hand a GS or KLR in the tight and rough stuff. You just need to adjust your riding style and speed.

    I'm sure others will chime in with plenty more ideas.

    Sent from my A898 Duo using Tapatalk 2