Moab - Motorcycles in Mt. Bike Open Areas?

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Zuber, Feb 21, 2014.

  1. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob

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    Going back to Moab in late April, hauling out both trail bikes and trials bikes. I've got several maps, but they are not specific on if some trails or areas are open to motorcycles. Looking for a play area for the trials bikes and don't want the stink eye from the 'push bikes'.

    Bartlett open area?
    Tusher open area?
    Any other area recommend for trials bikes?
    #1
  2. enduro-ince

    enduro-ince dirtslave

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    You definitely won't get the stink eye at area BFE. Its south of town about 11 miles or so, privately owned but open to the public with a donation recommended. Its mainly a rockcrawler area but i've had fun out there on the trials bike. I've also had good luck not being yelled at on slickrock and MOab Rim. BArtlett and tusher are pretty much no goes for motorized fun these days. Amasa back is fun on the trialer as well. The key to being cool is never getting of the slickrock and avoiding all soils unless its on an established route or BFE.

    what are your dates? I'll be out there 4/17 and 4/18. always looking for fellow trials guys to ride with.
    #2
  3. jjustj

    jjustj cum petris et choris

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    i prefer poison spider mesa or even the slick rock bike trail, One they see ya hopping around etc most mtn bikers are cool. i like to get there early! :freaky
    #3
  4. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    I've done tons of both activities around Moab for decades, and I find a fairly mixed bag of reactions from MTB'ers. It's funny...when you're a mountainbiker out on some of the trails mentioned, you'll hear a good bit more carping "amongst" the mountainbikers when they think you're "one of them". And after the carping, they usually still wave and act friendly toward the motorized users. And no...it's only a minority but maybe more than you think.
    #4
  5. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob

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    I'll be there the firday after the easter jeepers leave. Ride for about 7 days and leave on May 3rd? So, last full week in April . I need to look at a calendar. Looks like 10 of us, staying down Spanish Trail, close to the start of Steel Bender.

    I'll get out my maps and look up these spots.

    By slick rock, you don't mean any specific spot, just the open rock? I know about the soils.

    Thanks.
    #5
  6. enduro-ince

    enduro-ince dirtslave

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    Yes. Its easy to get tempted off trail a little bit to play on a ledge or boulder. Many places you can do this entirely on slickrock and leave no trace. The moto track through a virgin off limits sand patch is another story..
    #6
  7. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob

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    A Long Story:
    The last day of our previous trip, the first warm day of the year, a Saturday. We went to the slick rock 'fins n things' with the trials bikes. There were a lot of push bikes with lycra coated young millennials trying to ride them. At every encounter with the groups of riders, we would stop to wait (and watch) them clear obstacles. But, they would freeze and wave us past while giving us the stink eye. We thought it was maybe the two-stroke smoke, so we always rode down wind, but more stink eye. This went on and on for hours. We got to the end of the long loop and found some ledges and wash basins to play in, great traction. We sat in the sun and ate a snack, soaking up the sun and putting off driving back to the rain in Oregon. We waited long enough that a big pack of push bikes came down the trail. They were frowning, staring at us and riding directly toward us. I mumbled "oh boy here it comes", thinking we would get an earful about being on 'their' riding area (we were totally legal of course). These big guys ride up and stop right in front of us. "We've been watching you ride those motorcycles. I think that those look like the hot setup! I'm so god-dam sick of pushing this bike up the hills and walking it down hills, that looks like a lot of fun." A little different reaction than I expected. So, we showed them off a little, hopped up some ledges and did a few wheelies for them.
    #7
  8. ironbrewer

    ironbrewer Hopefully Riding

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    I always give motorcycles the stink eye when I'm riding my MTB around Moab.
    #8
  9. jjustj

    jjustj cum petris et choris

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slickrock_Trail

    :freaky:freaky:freaky:freaky

    Slickrock Trail
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Coordinates: 38°34′53″N 109°31′10



    The Slickrock Trail, located near Moab, Utah (USA), is a popular mountain biking destination with worldwide fame. This 13-mile (20.9 km) loop takes intrepid riders over a landscape of "petrified" sand dunes and the eroded remnants of ancient sea beds. The Slickrock Trail is one of the more difficult rides in the Moab area, both technically and cardiovascularly, and is not suitable for novice riders.
    Part of the Sand Flats Recreation Area, the Slickrock Trail was originally laid out in 1969 for use by motocross motorcycles, and the area is still open to such recreation today. 4X4 and off-road enthusiasts will find a challenge on the nearby Hell's Revenge Trail, which intersects the Slickrock Trail in several places.
    The so-called "slickrock" sandstone, which forms the majority of the trail's surface, is not slick at all, but has a surface much like sandpaper. The rubber tires of a mountain bike or off-road motorcycle will grip readily to its surface on all but the steepest hills. The sandpaper texture is notorious for inflicting severe abrasion injuries. The name "slickrock" was given by early settlers of the area because their horses' metal shoes had difficulty gaining traction on the rock's sloping surfaces. The same is true today for cyclists who use shoes with metal cleats while riding the Slickrock Trail. Slickrock also becomes very slick when wet.
    In geological terms, the Slickrock Trail is not part of the actual "slickrock" formation. Rather, most of the outcrop that forms the trail is Navajo Sandstone. More commonly, the term "slickrock" has come to mean any expanse of sandstone with a surface level enough for walking or riding.
    The Slickrock Trail consists of three main sections, an out-and-back lead-in (also known as a lollipop stick or a cherry stem), a 6.8-mile (10.9 km) loop, and an optional 2.3-mile (3.7 km) "practice loop". The lead-in, loop, and practice loop are clearly marked by white dashed lines to prevent riders from straying from the trail, becoming lost, or disturbing the fragile cryptobiotic soil through which the trail passes.
    A minimal fee is required to enter the Sand Flats Recreation Area. Pit-toilets are available at the trailhead, but there is no drinking water available within the area.
    Note, permitted trail activities included: mountain biking, hiking, motorcycling.

    https://maps.google.com/maps?expfla...07&q=Slickrock+Bike+Trail&iwloc=A&gl=US&hl=en

    made by motorcyclists show our presence!!!!
    #9
  10. UtahGuido

    UtahGuido Long timer

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    What's up with Bartletts not being moto friendly? I was thinking about going out there in a week or two with the trialer.
    #10
  11. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

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    If I am legal, on a trail where I can be and am not doing anything wrong, I am oblivious to stink-eye. I have as much right to be there as anyone. :dunno
    #11
  12. adventure girl

    adventure girl Donde esta la playa?!?

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    Hi there, I just stumbled across the BFE area last fall on a 950 ride. Can you give me an idea what it's like? Maybe compared to White Rim or trails around Merrimac/Monitor?:ear
    #12
  13. enduro-ince

    enduro-ince dirtslave

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    Its pretty much just rockcrawler routes as far as I've seen. Not much of anything there for a big bike. Not really much for a 450 size either unless you like really hard stuff. I think there are some youtube videos out there...
    #13
  14. coloradogoose

    coloradogoose Really?!?

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    I lived in Moab for 10 years and was only a mountain biker while I was there. Never rode a moto but had respect for them. As long as they were staying legal I had no issues. If they were off in the crypto, I was pissed and I would let them know. Of course, I did the same with mountain bikers and to be honest, I ripped into far more douchey mountain bikers who didn't respect the rules than I did moto riders. As a group it seems that moto riders understand the need to honor restrictions so we don't lose access better than mountain bikers do. I'm still a mountain biker first and a moto rider second, and I HATE the idiots who walk around giving mountain bikers a bad name. WEARING LYCRA DOES NOT MAKE YOU COOL!!!

    Anyway, as long as you are staying legal, ignore the stinkeye. Most of those idiots don't even know why they're giving it in the first place.
    #14