modern tires and mounting with spoons. What happened?

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by batoutoflahonda, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. batoutoflahonda

    batoutoflahonda Long timer

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    A pet peeve of mine has become mounting modern tires. I've been spooning on my own tires for a loooong time. I remember pretty much getting them on most of the way by hand. Any more they seem to get 3/4 of the way on and the bead is straight across the upper three quarter part of the rim. And solid. Is it just me or have others noticed this?

    Any way, I don't care what tire is the greatest flavor of the day, I just want one I can fix by the side of the road with out drama.

    So I ask you, people of the airheads, what you got?
    #1
  2. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    Kind of agree, but I havent been changing tires forever or anything. ANd the tires I put on the PD are probably the wrong ones. THey are not expecting to see a tubeless rim with such a high shelf outside.

    I have better luck with the G450X rims, actually, but still pop the shit out of the tubes given any opportunity.

    Going to try that tube-half-inflated idea next chance I get which is... oh shit... this week :cry
    #2
  3. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    This is really the easiest way!!!
    #3
  4. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    I have been changing a lot of tires for a long time. I don't have a tire machine at my own shop. I haven't noticed anything different in the way new tires mount over how they did 20 or 30 years ago.
    #4
  5. Padmei

    Padmei enamoured

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    Yes me & it pisses me off I have to take my fronts to the shop to change. Even then the mechs are smacking the things to get them right.
    If I get a flat out in the field i am screwed.

    (incidently I have 2 flat fronts on 2 different bikes this weekend - I'm beginnning to suspect my compressor head)
    #5
  6. WRC51

    WRC51 Been here awhile

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    I also have had this problem. This is on a KLR(sorry) with Shinko 705s the bead is nearly impossible to break. But when broken they spoon on and off pretty easy, I have been doing my own tires for years and never seen beads this hard to break, But I have also never seen tires that say they can be used tube or tubeless. Anyway yeah Id be screwed tring to break a bead along side the road.(It would be a nice show for the cars passing by)
    #6
  7. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    +1,tires is tires,take the time and do it right and it can be done. Do it wrong and its an all day misery
    #7
  8. Stagehand

    Stagehand Imperfectionist

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    Read it a number of times :freaky
    #8
  9. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    I think its the rims.

    I did a puncture repair on an excel rim and now I know what the fuss is all about.
    WM profile Akronts on my G/S are easy as and only the last quarter needs a lever then a quick one, two with two levers for the last bit.
    Been that way for 30 years and have seen tyres come and go some are easier some are harder but they all go on.
    #9
  10. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    Tires have gotten more difficult to change. I think it's because most tires nowadays are Tubeless, with stiffer beads (and maybe sidewalls). And of course, we're all getting stiffer with age. :eek1

    I think that longer Tire Irons help ( I have a pair of the 16" by Motion-Pro with a nice recurve'd tip) and using real-live Tire Lubricant (Ru-Glide) help a lot. :deal
    #10
  11. daveoneshot

    daveoneshot Been here awhile

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    I'll go with Bill Harris on this one.......we're getting older and stiffer. Sometimes I sweat my ass off mounting a tire with
    a tube, other times the work happens easily. But I never get anybody else to mount my tires.
    #11
  12. Wirespokes

    Wirespokes Beemerholics Anonymous

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    Changed a front tire yesterday on a friend's 1999 R1100S. New Dunlop.

    Got the first side on, but the second wouldn't go more than 2/3 of the way without a major struggle!

    With the tire lubed the tire iron just wants to slide back, like running on a treadmill. One step forward, slide back to GO, one step forward...

    Finally had to use C Clamps to hold my position and gain a couple inches each bite.

    I've had problems with Dunlops before so stay away from them, and it's one of the reasons I like the Bridgestones - lots easier to install than some of the other brands.

    As for our airhead wheels, some tires are easier than others, and some not so easy. But I have found that tire lube eliminates the hassle of airing up a tubeless tire after installation. It used to be my compressor didn't always pop em on the bead (air leaking out faster than going in), but now I use a hand pump. Same with the 11S yesterday - the hand pump did it, but it took something like 80 lbs to get it all the way on! :eek1

    My LS took something like 30 or 35lbs to pop on the bead in comparison.
    #12
  13. lkchris

    lkchris Albuquerque

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    The ultimate solution is to find tires that are still made tube-type only.

    This means, of course, importing them from Europe in most cases.

    If you think in 2012 that many tire manufacturers are interested in 30-year-old motorcycles, you're mistaken.

    Somebody should start a business around this.
    #13
  14. batoutoflahonda

    batoutoflahonda Long timer

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    I agree on the Dunlop. I really like them but quit using them even on my dirt bikes because they were such a pain. Yeah, I think the big deal is most manufactures now gear towards non tube type. Even if it says tube type, I haven't seen much difference, here in the states any way, between the two. The stiffer beads make the tire seem like it's a size too small.

    I'll look into the European tube tires. All I can say is the Avon I mounted yesterday was real chore. Maybe in the future when folks post tire opinions they well say how mounting them goes. Till then, ugh.

    'C' clamps. Wow. I had a Dunlop 606 on my Honda XR600 I thought I was going to have to cut to get it off the rim. I feel your pain. Wear safety glasses.
    #14
  15. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl ignore list

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    Amazing how much I've learned from Ned....I learned to put more air in the tube than I think I need, and it solved my pinch problems. I have to remind myself that if I'm trying too hard to push the bead over the rim, I've done something wrong like let the other side slide up out of the dish. Also, my new habit is a little monkey butt in the tire helps keep it from sticking and folding. I've had problems breaking beads on all Shinko tires.....really need another bike and use the sidestand as the breaker. It's always been a 2 person job breaking shinko beads for me. Watch your rotors!
    #15
  16. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod I want to do right, but not right now

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    Everytime this has happened to me, the other side of the tire has popped out of the trough and I just didn't realize it.
    #16
  17. fsuitw

    fsuitw n00b

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    I recently had great luck with a set of stubby tire tools (http://www.stubbytiretools.com). Great leverage, comfortable in hand, and no marring to boot. I haven't used them on a modern tubeless tire, but for my application (73 r75/5) they were awesome.
    #17
  18. Tosh Togo

    Tosh Togo Long timer

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    :stupid

    With one minor correction.... some riders are more inclined to whine about tires being difficult to mount. I guess that they've forgotten/ignored/made no effort to learn that-
    Yuppers...just be smarter than the tires are... :D

    fyi, in my meager experiences, the fact that a tire is tube-type or tubeless makes no difference, while the manufacturer's decisions about carcass stiffness does. Some are stiff, some are limber, and the fun part is in the finding out. :evil
    #18
  19. Bill Harris

    Bill Harris Confirmed Curmudgeon

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    Bridgestone S11 Spitfires? Long-wearing, cost-effective, with decent handling?

    I'm considering a change from Avon to those next "F&R" tire change.
    #19
  20. supershaft

    supershaft because I can

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    I agree. Tube or tubeless makes no difference. I also agree that not all tires are alike but tube or tubeless doesn't have anything to do with it. Someone mentioned Dunlop Knobbies. They have been a mofo to mount forever that I know of. Dunlop bias plies in general are constructed like old 3/4 ton truck tires in so far as their weight and carcass stiffness is concerned. I use to work at a multi-line very busy dealership and we cut all the used tires in two for the landfill. The difference between Dunlop bias ply tires and most other brand bias ply tires was night and day.
    #20