MONO/PARA weights

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by Phreaky Phil, Dec 25, 2012.

  1. Padmei

    Padmei enamoured

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    I have taken Schmidt up a lot of stupid places down here. To me the limiting factor is the width- squeezing between gates, logs etc & the ground clearance- a lot of the rivers & tracks down here have biggish boulders that give the centre stand a hammering.
    The old BMW can tractor up most places with relative ease - going down is another matter:D
    That said I only do roads & easy stuff on the BM & leave the stupid stuff to the DRZ

    This may be off topic kinda but the other downside of Schmidt off road is that when going slow with slowish engine revs over technical stuff it really wants to fall over on the RHS:huh
    #41
  2. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    You know the answer dont you !

    Dont go slow then :D
    #42
  3. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    It's not what it looks like. I parked it there. A guy on a DR had lost it, ran over the top of someone else's bike and then landed in a deep rut. He ended up with a broken wrist, but it could have been worse. I had steep and loose down hills.

    [​IMG]
    #43
  4. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    Thats the Kaipara ride you are talking about.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I cant remember the section of undulations but I remember the deep sand tracks at the far end. Man, they were hard work !
    With a poillion you cant stand up for the rough trails so good suspension is key, but even with good suspension our speed has to be dropped in the rough stuff. The rear end our paralever is OK for the amount of travel available, especially compared with the stock front forks. (My old USD set that Vege has now was way better) Except on corrugations, where it hops around. Not sure if i've got to much rebound or whether there is just to much weight for the shock to cope with.
    HP2's are rare and expensive and I have seen those late model final drives pissing out oil.
    KTM adventures are to big and heavy, ive thought about an 950 SE but they are not made any more and are rare. Aparently they are a missile and shred rear tires :evil
    #44
  5. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    Yes, the sandy stuff was a hoot. I don't know how people got through there on the big bikes and I hate to think what was like two up. Since I helped a little while the course was being set up, I had the pleasure of riding most of it three times. I was OK at speed, but as soon as I had to slow down, it was all over. I nearly ran into the back of Oscar's 950, while he was stopped.:evil.

    Muriwai Beach is iron sand, when I cleaned the bean can recently, it had attracted a lot of the magnetic metal fuzz. One of the reasons that I think I'll stay off the beach from now on. Woodhill might be OK, but I hate that salt getting in everywhere.

    Vege loves his suspension. I can't believe how fast he is on gravel, I don't usually like getting passed, but when Chris Birch went past on Inland road on his 990, it was great to watch. The laws of physics do not seem to apply to him. I seem to be attracted by gravity a lot more, it's not happy until I am horizontal.

    I've just drained a couple of hundred ml of oil from the rear boot of the final drive on the R80GS it must have accumulated there for a while. I was expecting the usual table spoon full, not a puddle on the ground. Since the gearbox is still full, I am not too worried. I hear wet shaft drives last longer :-).
    #45
  6. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    Mine used to leak, even after I had had the final drive rebuilt, and as I am anal about oil leaks it drove me nuts. We figured it was migrating down between the shaft and the sleeve as it shouldnt be able to get past the seal, so Mike D put some crc wicking compound into it. Havent looked in there for a long time to see if there is any oil there.
    In the deep sand the front end wanted to spear off sideways. I tried riding it fast, dirtbike style but that nearly ended in tears so we just had to slog it out slowly. The soft front forks dont help as when the front would grab and want to go sideways it would just compress the forks and tuck the front under.
    I have never seen Chris ride on gravel before but if its anything like on a dirt bike it would be spectacular.
    If he has another school we should come up and see if he can teach us to ride sand 2up better. Not sure if he has done any 2 up adv riding.?
    We tried both standing a couple of times (on the Beemer ), weird.:eek1 I would need to shift the controls around a bit as its set up for sit down riding. And Dawn needs something around my waist to hang on to.
    #46
  7. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    Dawn is amazing, the stuff you two do together and she seems to be enjoying herself. Has she never wanted to ride herself? We'll be heading off tomorrow, starting with the Off-limits ride in Waiouru. It's amazing how much stuff we can pack on Gerda's bike, all I have to carry is one bag.:D,

    [​IMG]
    #47
  8. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    She did have a go and has a learner licence but would rather be a pillion.
    Travelling light is good ! Give it to someone else to carry:clap
    That ride sounded good. I would like to explore that area myself, but we are trying to get some things done around the house that I have been putting off for a long time :deal
    Enjoy the ride and do a report for us.
    #48
  9. elmontanero

    elmontanero Practicing...

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    This is good information - does using these different Swings/FD provide better/longer/higher rear ends?
    Seems like swapping front ends gives Airheads always comes with the need to sort out the rear, is there a preferred Oilhead Swing Arm/ Final Drive that gives you the best rear suspension for the effort?(besides weight/disc brake) I've seen the HPN:
    HPN-Sport: The "light" HPN for the sports rider.With the reinforced BMW GS frame, the BMW R1100GS swingarm and the best accessories parts from Brembo, Marzocchi, WP Suspension, Acerbis and HPN we created a motorcycle with superb handling on- and offroad
    Among the info: Teleskopic front fork: Marzocchi Magnum, ø50mm, 285 mm travel. Shock absorber: Special built WP Suspension with adjustable compression and rebound damper settings and hydraulic adjustable spring preload
    Swing arm: BMW R1100GS Series

    [​IMG]

    #49
  10. elmontanero

    elmontanero Practicing...

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    And this one too:
    [​IMG]
    HPN-Rallyesport: The "long-distance" HPN for the adventurer. With the reinforced BMW GS frame, the BMW R1100GS swingarm.
    Teleskopic front fork: Marzocchi Magnum, ø50mm, 285 mm travel, or WP Suspension Upside-Down 295 mm travel
    Shock absorber: Special built WP Suspension with adjustable compression and rebound damper settings and hydraulic adjustable spring preload Swing arm: BMW R1100GS serie or welded aluminum construction, 245 mm travel
    #50
  11. Basic_Gerd

    Basic_Gerd Gerd

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    #51
  12. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    I drained the remaing fuel from my GS tank this arvo. It weighs 6.2kg. As a comparison the Touratech site lists the 43litre tank as 7.6kg package weight. Not sure if that is boxed up but either way only 1.4kg heavier.
    Anyone have an empty one to weigh ?
    How about the 19 litre tank ?
    #52
  13. Box'a'bits

    Box'a'bits In need of repair

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    The important thing with the 43l tank is it gets the weight below the spine of the bike, so regardless of actual weight, it feels lighter (assuming the same fuel load between tanks).

    You'd also need to include the fittings for the big tank (two on the front of the frame & one at the rear, & the rubber damper mod frame).
    #53
  14. Phreaky Phil

    Phreaky Phil Long timer

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    Yes,the big tank would certainly carry the same quantity of fuel lower than the original, I take it from your post that its noticable ? Thats a lot of fuel when you fill it up though. My DR Safari tank holds 38l and its bloody heavy to lift off the bike when its full.
    I would assume the Touratech weight would include the brackets as its the shipping weight.
    Do you get the same steering lock with the 43l tank and USD as stock tank and forks ?
    #54
  15. Rucksta

    Rucksta SS Blowhard

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    43 lt tank (paintable) with mounting hardware, Fuel cap & taps 8.3kgs or about the same as the steel 32lt Dakar tank
    #55
  16. Airhead Wrangler

    Airhead Wrangler Long timer

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    It actually gives you a bit more clearance than the stock tanks.
    #56
  17. Kokopelli

    Kokopelli Yeah, right!

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    The ride was awesome. I am still at National Park, so no photos yet (watch out on McCardigan's thread). I really love that front suspension. It took some really big hits and some jumps (well, not huge ones) in it's stride, never once got close to bottoming out. The scenery was stunning and this ride is right up there with the best I've done, for a very reasonable price.

    I can now confidently run my airhead at high 3rd gear speeds on deep loose gravel/sand, let's call it a river bed. Tank tracks with with wash outs and ruts, were soaked up really well. My riding definitely went up a notch and should now be close to average.

    If I could sort out that slight stall off idle, I would be a happy man. I am also really liking those new Husqvarnas (BMW is easier to spell, that's why I am riding one, or two), that could be a nice commuter with adventure riding duties (checking lotto ticket, again).
    #57