Morocco bike choice

Discussion in 'EMEA' started by mmoore89, Sep 21, 2017.

?

Which bike?

  1. Honda XR600

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Suzuki DR650

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  3. Suzuki DR800

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. mmoore89

    mmoore89 Adventurer

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    Hello all,

    Im planning a trip to Morocco! Woohoo, have been dreaming about it for years, and now its going to happen!

    I have a lovely sparkly KTM, which I will not be taking with me (I am fully aware that many people travel Morocco on hugely expensive BMWs, but I just wont do it, so dont try to persuade me)
    I am just too worried about, theft, damage, weight of bike etc etc.

    So I am in the market for a second cheap, basic, reliable, reasonably comfortable bike. Budget ranges from 1000 Euros to 1500 Euros.

    Choice are;
    Honda XR600
    Suzuki DR650
    Suzuki DR800

    Yes I know there are other bikes for not much more, XT660, BMW F650 Dakar etc etc that are all more modern and not too much more expensive. But I cant afford them! Not with keeping the KTM (Which is definitely not going anywhere!)

    So taking into account a long drive from either Netherlands or UK to France to catch the ferry, and then 8 days of driving around Morocco. Which bike would you get?

    Really looking forward to hearing your opinions!
    #1
  2. chasbmw

    chasbmw Long timer

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    Why don't you rent in Marocco, fly into Marrakech rent the next day and off you go. Big choice of bikes, some pretty new. I am off in November on a small group tour run by Chris Scott, we will be riding XR250s if the rental agency hasn't replaced them with BMW 310.s. Nice and light and easy off road. I can send you details of the rental people if you want.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #2
  3. Fishnbiker

    Fishnbiker Tire smuddy, hook swet

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    When? Morocco weather can vary a lot depending on the month & location. Rental bike out of Marrakech would give you a lot more time in country. On road/off road? strictly riding or cultural adventures too?
    Give us something to go on.

    For some ideas, my photos of last 2 visits are at;
    https://fishnbiker.smugmug.com/Travel/Morocco
    #3
  4. EastRoad

    EastRoad Road Viking

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    Switzerland
    I've been in morocco the previous year... albeit I rode my bike (the one and only I have, my old R1150GSA) from switzerland down to morocco.

    In essence, in all but the most extreme offroad the bike was pefectly fine... when it was just mud though, I wished for a lighter bike ;)
    but the big thing handled it surprisingly well.

    I'd say both your choice of season and route would have an impact on the type of bike - morocco can vary in those regards, vastly.

    My personal philosophy is to use what you actually have... I don't see much point in buying a bike for a trip to morocco if you already own a bike and anyhow plan on shipping it.
    if for practicality only, rent one.

    forced to chose from the three on your list, I'd go with the DR800.... I might swap or mod the standard seat.
    I feel of the three the DR800 would make the best compromise.
    Morocco is not just dirt riding ;)

    and as you plan to ride from the netherlands and probably spend a lot of miles on the highways thus... the DR800 just makes more sense.

    When I did my morocco trip, as mentioned, I did start in switzerland.
    Having done a lot of riding in France and Spain and having "only" 21 days for the entire trip, I though I might as well fasttrack the two countries by going all autobahn on the way down to algeciras.
    It was a good choice and saved me a lot of time. but honestly I was VERY happy with my big bike on the long way down. Ample power, enough comfort...
    Sure, you can "easily" ride from the netherlands to morocco on a 600c bike... but you'll find the seat lacking in comfort on most and the lack of power on the highway will be frustrating, it would be to me at least.

    btw.
    Do yourself a favour and take the ferry to Tangier MED and NOT CUETA... cueta has a properly miserable border crossing ;) (that is, unless you like spending a stupid amount of time being pestered, and running from one border shack to the other and back again)... Tangier MED, far more easy, modern and fast.


    That aside: ENJOY MOROCCO... it's a damn fine place, offers excellent riding, stunning scenery, really good food, nice folks... at least I did thoroughly enjoy my far too short time and will be back at some point for more ;)
    #4
  5. mmoore89

    mmoore89 Adventurer

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    Hello,

    Not flying and riding, although I will probably do that at some point. Rental costs look very reasonable.

    Will be a mix of offroad and on road. I would say aiming for about 40/50 road and offroad.

    Yes of course culture as well as driving! Want to see as much as possible and meet as many people as possible etc.

    Timing - End of October this year + again in June next year. (If its a cheap bike I might even leave it there...)

    Ferry - Debating Sete vs Algericas... Just a money calculation really. (+ I like long distance ferries)

    Hmm... So Eastroad, you would recommend taking the KTM 1190 Adventure R?
    #5
  6. NEGANTELIS

    NEGANTELIS ride till die

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    Latvia
    Hellow.

    I have been in Marocco 3 times and after 2 weeks will be the 4 time.

    First time f800gs 4 people
    Second time ktm 690r 3 People
    Third time 690r solo/alone

    Never i felt any threat. I was riding alone, usually finish at night. Was walking at every market in night, eating in local shops etc.

    I felt safe every time.


    This time i think will take the bike much more like hard enduro which is my RMX540Z, why, because of previous expierence.

    I will explain in 3 words.

    With F800GS you will see 1/3 of amazing places and with xt660z brake your neck off.

    If you have expierence with enduro (real one) then take as small bike as you can. Off course it will be some pain in the ass first day,but then the real stuff will begun, and you will love it.



    Here are some pics from my last ride in 2017 January or Febr, don`t remember.


    If you take bike no bigger than 690 then we can collaborate.
    My email aldis@akategorija.lv



    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #6
  7. EastRoad

    EastRoad Road Viking

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    If the 1190 is the bike you've got and are familiar with, I would definitely recommend taking it... the 1190 is an amazing bike in my opinion.

    Sure, a lighter bike does have some advantages, but frankly I have not seen a LOT of stuff that even my big fat heavy R1150GSA wouldn't happily do.

    with 40/50 road/offroad choice, I don't think you could go wrong with the KTM...
    If you'd plan for 90% hard offroad, a lighter bike would be preferable I guess. but again, I'm all for using what you actually have.
    For me it's like this: the R1150GSA I ride almost daily... I'm utterly familiar with its perks, it's strength, it's weak points... and I trust the bike on long distance travel... hasn't let me down.
    Maybe I'm not "hardcore" enough - but I see not much virtue in hogging several thousand kilometers on tarmac on a small uncomfortable underpowered off-road-hungry bike.
    And at least for me, getting to a place is a part of the trip.... and getting there with some degree of comfort, well I frankly don't mind...

    IF my garage would have several bikes to pick from, I would maybe think about it twice... but again, the R1150GSA is my current bike and it has done everything from tarmac to gravel to off-road... from daily groceries to 1000+km/day rides

    [​IMG]
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    #7
  8. GiorgioXT

    GiorgioXT Long timer

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    If you are going alone , a small enduro bike make less sense - as at home - its definitely not a safe idea riding alone on rough terrain .
    I'm not saying that is not possible, only that being alone you will need to be so careful and avoid risks - this would take away most of advantages of a racing enduro,
    #8
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  9. NEGANTELIS

    NEGANTELIS ride till die

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    Yes, There is some part of true in your opinion. But in reality on smaller bike you can get out from unexpected "o shit what now" moments much easier or with only brown stripe ,not crash.
    #9
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  10. wheatwhacker

    wheatwhacker It's raining here

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    When are you leaving?
    I may shoot down in Late October on my Africa Twin if you want to tag along.
    #10
  11. NEGANTELIS

    NEGANTELIS ride till die

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Latvia

    I plan to be in marocco staring from 12 or 13 October and till ~ begining on Nov.
    #11
  12. Teabar

    Teabar Been here awhile

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    I've been off road in Morocco. I was with this guy on an 800GS and he JUST got round. For off road riding the rule for me is simple, the smaller the better (within reason). And good tyres are critical - the more knobbly the better. If I was going again I would fly in and rent.
    Good luck
    #12
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