Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. espressodrinker

    espressodrinker Cape Town Wanderer

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    #21
  2. Motopapillon

    Motopapillon Eppur si muove

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    1) Don't hit anything.
    2) Don't let anything hit you.
    3) Don't fall over.

    Sounds simple enough, doesn't it?

    M-P
    #22
  3. Navy Chief

    Navy Chief Long timer

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    I like the simple logic of this! :clap
    #23
  4. mhpr262

    mhpr262 Banned

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    1: Always remember:

    On a motorcycle you will FEEL proficient long before you really ARE.


    2: When you want to change the oil,don´t start the engine and let it run for a few minutes to warm up the oil, go on a proper ride instead and then wait for an hour -- the oil will still be hot, but the exhaust will already be cold.
    #24
  5. wizze

    wizze Wizze = Wise

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    It's easier to see if somebody is moving towards you by watching where the tire meets the road. This works for vehicles at intersections, vehicles changing lanes, etc. The ones that bug me are the cagers that are "looking at you" but start rolling before they really oughta.
    #25
  6. miah66

    miah66 Pathfinder

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    Noob here, checking in. Good advice people.
    #26
  7. ralpfsbud

    ralpfsbud Semper Fi

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    couple of things ive learned
    the throttle is your friend, learn how to use it.

    i have crashed, i will crash again. there is nothing wrong with it, and doing it will remove the fear of it. i wear the gear so i can get back up. its part of riding off road,

    i ride with people that are better than i am to learn, but if i fall behind its ok. i push it when i think its a good idea, and dont when its not. youve got to spend the time in the saddle to learn the difference, nothing will teach you more than time in the saddle. i ride ANY time i can for that reason.

    AND.... the throttle is your friend, when you know how to use it
    #27
  8. eRRmmm

    eRRmmm Been here awhile

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    Agree. Twist the throttle, don't roll it... Sounds simple, but learn proper throttle control and you will have much better control of the bike.

    Also reinforcing what others have said - ride to your ability, keeping up with other riders could hurt you. Just because they are faster doesn't mean they are better riders. A good rider will go for a long time without a crash. A fast rider if he's not also a good rider will crash on a regular basis, I've ridden with a few of them. One of these crashes may end his riding career. If you get a chance to ride with a good and fast rider - watch and learn.
    #28
  9. Anticyclone

    Anticyclone Ride more worry less

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    One of my best friends told me, years before I started riding, to keep as much space as possible between you and another vehicle. Sounds simple, but it's pretty hard for a car to hit you if it's 50 yards away:D
    #29
  10. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

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    It is more fun to ride a slow bike fast than to ride a fast bike slow:evil
    #30
  11. Tucson Jim

    Tucson Jim Been here awhile

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    Ride like you are invisable and everyone is trying to kill you.

    Everytime you stop use the same techniques you would use in an emergency. I start with light rear brake to scrub a little speed and then apply the front right afterwards, using BOTH brakes together. May not be the right way but it works for me.

    Been on a motorcycle since '78 and haven't put it down (on asphalt) yet. Knock on wood!

    Assume they are going to pull in front of you, they will change lanes without signaling, don't ride in their blind spot, flash your brakelight a few times when stopping, install an extra 'cyclops' brake light.

    ATGATT. Helmet, boots, gloves, long sleeves/pants, padded jacket.

    Learning in the dirt made me appreciate the subleties of turning and stopping.
    #31
  12. Mountain Cruiser

    Mountain Cruiser Banned

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    My advice, slow down and enjoy the ride.

    Riceman
    #32
  13. EDS_TLS

    EDS_TLS Adventurer

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    dress warm
    #33
  14. jonoh71

    jonoh71 Adventurer

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    Best thread I've read to date.:clap I think you guys have already saved me at least one crash.:D
    Keep em comin'...
    Jon
    #34
  15. Guano11

    Guano11 Behind Bars....

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    Don't add alcohol.

    Not saying "never, ever" -- but not just yet. Alcohol always increases risk, and a Noob has enough risk factors to mitigate already. No need to add one voluntarily.

    Regardless of what your relationship with alcohol is, don't mix it with riding.
    #35
  16. MustTourEurope

    MustTourEurope Adventurer

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    Practice VERY FAST head turns/shoulder checks(when changing lanes, turning at junctions)...you'll never know the one in front of you(car,bike,drunk guy running:1drink ) may have abruptly stopped to avoid Godzilla's poo. You don't want to be mixed up with the poo, do you?:wink:
    #36
  17. cold_fire

    cold_fire Famous Head Scratcher

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    When in doubt, gas it (especially in the dirt).
    Ride on the wheel tracks, not between them.
    Keep at least a 2 seconds distance between you and the vehicle in front of you.
    In an emergency brake situation, take a quick peek in your mirrors. There's a good probability that the guy behind you didn't see you brake.
    Always scan the road and look for the odd vehicle.
    Keep your head cool. There's just no contest between a 200kg bike and an 1.5 ton car.
    Drivers aren't evil (or, at least, 99% of them), they just don't see you. Make yourself visible. Add lights, horns, wear hi-viz. If you suspect one is going to cut you off at an intersection, swerve in front of him or stand on the pegs.
    Stay out of blind spots. If you don't see the driver's eyes in his mirror, he won't see you.
    As someone noted before, ride dirt. It'll teach you a lot faster and a lot less painful the limits of traction.
    Take a track day, even if you've only got a 125.
    Never push through a blind corner.
    #37
  18. duck

    duck Banned

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    When you're using the gears and engine compression to slow the bike, be sure to tap the front or rear brake to light up your brake light to let the car behind you know that you're slowing.
    #38
  19. Uhuru

    Uhuru Wildest place I've been

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    +1. And keep checking who's coming up in the lanes beside/behind you, even though you're sure no one is there.
    #39
  20. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Take in what is going on well ahead of where you are. Project yourself out 12 seconds whenever possible.

    Knowing what is coming far ahead enables you to warn those behind you (lane weave, flashing your brake lights…) as to what is going on.

    It also allows you to change lanes and smoothly ride past what may have put you in harms way.


    Smooth is where its at. :deal

    RIDE SMART. RIDE OFTEN. :ricky
    #40