Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. opaque_machete

    opaque_machete girls wanna have fun

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    An absolute must for a helmet is fit. My hubby's bike slid out from under him at low speed in the mud and was knocked out because his helmet was fitted incorrectly. Be sure that the helmet fits side to side and front to back as well as somewhat squeezing the cheeks. When you move it, it should move your skin with it. If it does not fit, don't buy it. I have to buy Vega's because of the shape of my head. My hubby needs AFX or Icon. MAKE SURE YOUR HELMET FITS YOUR HEAD!!!


    Oh, and by the way...I paid a whopping $19 for my helmet on Ebay, because I know what fits. Can't beat that for bargain!
  2. tokyoklahoma

    tokyoklahoma 75%has been 25%wanabe

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    http://nm.msf-usa.org/msf/ridercourses.aspx?state=TN
  3. orangebear

    orangebear Long timer

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    plus 1 on the helmet all way were one as it will save your life.

    you should never were the old pudding boll tipe helmets that are the half helmets you see as they were band in the uk in the 1980 for being crap if you ever crashed and are not legal on the road.
  4. MurphCO

    MurphCO Been here awhile

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    People aren't going to like this, but I have said it to every newer rider I have ridden with.....


    After you take the MSF course and after a few miles under your belt getting your bearings, I highly suggest you find a nice piece of straight full sightline road and go REAL FAST a few times.


    My logic, after you have gone fast like that, 45mph doesn't seem so fast and you are more relaxed at normal street and city speeds. You realize how much time you have to react is VASTLY different between 45 and 100, and you are a better rider for it.


    If you crash from doing this, meh you probably weren't meant to be riding anyway....:wink:
  5. opaque_machete

    opaque_machete girls wanna have fun

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    Let the flames begin. :rofl

    I do tend to disagree, however. Speed is something you begin to work up to after you have the muscle memory. It's not that difficult once you realize the bike isn't gonna start bucking you off because you gave it plenty of reign. :D
  6. AdrenalinJunkie

    AdrenalinJunkie Been here awhile

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    Reading the two posts above this reminds me of the differences between a optimist, pessimist, and a realist. The realist thinks somebody used a glass twice as big as they needed. The realist in me thinks that MOST (not all) that learn how to ride are gonna twist that wrist, even without someone telling them they needed to. I definitely vote for a controlled environment, which can be hard to find on the road.
  7. leejosepho

    leejosepho Sure, I can do that!

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    ... or at least a more-confident one, and that is what I have done (up to about 70 mph so far) in order to refresh my own confidence a bit after not riding at all over the past 15 years.
  8. Rasputin

    Rasputin n00b

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    I started riding at age 51. A few things that have been helpful over the last 3 years:

    The MSF BRC was essential.
    Hough's Proficient Motorcycling.
    Videos on YouTube of how to make slow speed figure 8's, etc.
    I bought gear first, then bike. With the exception of jeans instead of my riding pants, ATGATT.
    Parking lot practice.
    Keeping safety in mind by reading on the internet (I read this whole 54 pages).

    Probably my biggest danger is a mental brownout. The close calls I've had have been when I was not fully concentrating, or properly reacting to potential danger. I must keep alert and apply what I've learned.
  9. BahakMoto

    BahakMoto n00b

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    Be well seated on the Bike, tips of foot and two fingers on Brake and Clutch. Keep your eyes on the Horizon, not in the road that is passing below you. Ride with no fear, but nether without respect. Use a Helmet that its value represent the value that you have for your brain.
  10. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Not sure what is meant by this. (the helmet thread is down the hall on the left)

    Buy a helmet that fits and that you can afford and WEAR IT!!!

    Personally I would NEVER buy a used one.

    They are one time use... Meaning that once it has hit the ground with any force (even dropped) it should have the straps cut off of it an retired.

    Can a dropped helmet still be good? Yes of course it can... But I wouldn't bet my life on it. :deal
  11. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Don't be this guy. Learn from his humble admission.

    <IFRAME height=360 src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TFD9az2eAv0" frameBorder=0 width=640 allowfullscreen></IFRAME>
  12. The farthest I've moved my bike under its own power was from a gas pump to a parking space at a gas station in Prescott, AZ. I'd seen this video before and it's part of the reason I don't do what he did. Thanks for posting it for everyone :D
  13. DirtReeper

    DirtReeper Been here awhile

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    My dad had some really good advice.

    #1) its easier to teach someone to ride in dirt than it is on pavement, therefore its easier to learn on dirt than pavement.
    #2) ATGATT!
    #3) open that Mikuni up in the sand it will stand you back up.
    #4) ride in Your comfort zone. keeping up with me will come later
    #5) watch for rocks
    #6) stay back from semis unless you are about to pass them.
    #7) your mom rides slow........shell catch up lets go :p
    #8) watch out for the idiots in cars they dont see you
    #9) just cause you got a nice new HiViz armoured jacket for your Bday doesnt mean the stupid cagers will see you.

    guess I had a pretty good teacher.
    Thanks Dad :D
    oh and one more:
    when you think you know it all about riding, you DON'T. you will NEVER know it all.
  14. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    :thumb Stay back for wind blast... But when you do pass, speeding ticket be damned! Go T.F on and don't piss around.


    The slower you are, the longer it takes to overtake it. And it's not like you could use that as a defense in court, and a ticket's a hell of a lot better than being a stain on the highway.
  15. TigerLilly

    TigerLilly Om Namah Shivaya

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    If you want to ride fast, go do a track day. A controlled, known, environment is great for honing your skills. On the street, give yourself a big safety margin. I see guys in my riding group that ride way beyond their skill level all the time. At least two of them have had very serious crashes in the past two years. Stupid shit like not having the skill set to adjust their lines in a corner when a car was a bit over the center line. Better yet, sign up for one of the better riding schools. I have taken a bunch of them and the skills I learned there have saved my life over and over and over again.
  16. ShardPhoenix

    ShardPhoenix Наглый ублюдок

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    When I made the decision to get into motorcycle riding a couple of months ago (June-ish), I made good use of my web-fu.

    I knew I wouldn't be able to buy a motorcycle until this month, so I knew I'd have the whole summer to sit in front of the computer and read, read, read, and read some more. Bought both "Proficient Motorcycling" books, and took the Team Oregon BRC.

    At times my wife has thought my compulsive forum reading has been out of control, but I'm an information hound. I am really quite glad for the existence of all the great motorcycling websites that have been full of helpful, experienced folk that share what they know with the FNG's. :freaky

    The only "downside" to all the reading I've done, is the depression that went along with having no ride...yet.

    10-ish more days and I'll be able to remedy this issue..... not going to make it much longer...must....ride....must escape the cage..... :becca

    Anyway, I suppose the point I'm trying to make is I feel like I'm much more prepared to get out on the road than I would have had I never taken the time to do the research. I'm a "stack as many cards in my favor as I can" type of guy.
  17. ShardPhoenix

    ShardPhoenix Наглый ублюдок

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    One I can afford!

    In all seriousness, I'm not trying to be super picky since I've only got $2,000 to spend and I'm buying used. I'd like to find a cruiser in the 250-750cc range. I will say I'm kind of fond of the Suzuki Savage/S40's because I like thumpers. I'm also keeping my eyes peeled for Honda Shadows and Yamaha Viragos. Year doesn't matter too much, but condition is important. I'm not allergic to doing maintenance, but I don't want a big project.

    I don't need something uber-powerful or whatever, as I'm not one of those "bigger is better" types. I know full well that a Honda Rebel 250 (or something similar) would suit my needs just fine.
  18. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    Well, make sure you save some of that for "the track" or MSF courses... Even if you're like me and don't have a track in THE ENTIRE STATE...

    Not sure about where you are,, but $1,500 out of your $2,000 budget should handle it nicely...
  19. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Of the bikes you mentioned I say go with the S40. You will not be happy with a 250cc cruiser for long. It is not a case of bigger is better... It is more a case of what the bike is capable of doing.

    Also have a look at a Ninja 250. It is likely the only 250cc bike that falls in your budget parameters that is capable of sustained highway speeds. They wrap it like a Sport Bike but it is a Standard

    The little Ninja will make you laugh out loud where the others will only garner a smile.
  20. ShardPhoenix

    ShardPhoenix Наглый ублюдок

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    Already took the MSF basic course, I've bought gear (Helmet, Gloves, Jacket, Pants, Boots), all I need now is the ride. After I get some time under my belt, I'm going to take the advanced course, which amusingly enough is held on a GO KART track that's in the area.

    @Dakez

    S40 is my primary choice. There are a couple for sale in the area, and well within my budget.