Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. opaque_machete

    opaque_machete girls wanna have fun

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    I love my little ninjette. It's so much fun to ride. Has nothing on the bottom end, but talk about corners! Hubby loves it too. :lol3 He calls it a 'giggle bike' because it makes him grin like the Cheshire cat. :lol3 And it's really good on gas and pretty reliable. It's just a fun bike. Have fun and ride safe!
  2. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    I wish I had that... I thought I could use an ABANDONED mall for my back-in practice, but the guy ran me off.

    Sucks mainly b/c I'm the only one interested in that sort of thing around here, and prolly the 3rd Supermoto in town.

    So it's not like there'd ever be droves of bikes roaming the empty parking lots...


    oh well...
  3. FloorPoor

    FloorPoor Been here awhile

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    Get a DR650 of KLR 650 if you like thumpers and only have 2 grand to spend. You will get far more enjoyment out of one of those IMHO. I am just biased, I hate riding on pavement and only do it when necessary. A savage is a good choice though, my cousin got one as a starter bike and is still riding it two years later, he likes it.
  4. ShardPhoenix

    ShardPhoenix Наглый ублюдок

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    Haven't seen any DR's or KLR's come up in my area. Only seen a couple dual sports come up in my price range, and they were a little... beat up.

    Made a couple inquiries to a few guys about some bikes, one of which is a 2005 S40, 9k miles, $1900. I just have to hope it doesn't sell before the middle of this coming week. Have my fingers crossed.


    ------edit-----
    I've just graduated from total wannabe to "newbie". Bought the S40, and am quite pleased with it. My maiden voyage even included 30ish miles of slab.. I-5 between Medford and Grants Pass. Was a beautiful ride.
  5. daq7

    daq7 Been here awhile

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    Be careful of new tires. The wife low sided her g650 about a month ago and dislocated her shoulder...
  6. SCQTT

    SCQTT Zwei Kolben

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    The OP asked this question 18 months ago. During that 18 months we have given him 55 pages of information. I think he is probably a guy doing research for a book.

    Perhaps for a book about what a new rider should know, but more likely a book about how, when given an opportunity, us humans will grab a string and run with it....when we are asked a question we love to have the answer, be the expert.

    This person might be lurking, or dead, or laughing his ass off, or cashing a check, or might have decided that motorcycles are too complicated and just bought a boat instead.
  7. opaque_machete

    opaque_machete girls wanna have fun

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    That may be so, Scott, but it is still good information for a noob to have. I know it has helped me several times while learning.
  8. MotoMusicMark

    MotoMusicMark n00b

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    SCQTT, opaque_machete, DAKEZ, and others,

    It's me, MotoMusicMark,...yes, a true moto-noob! Thanks so much for all contributors to this thread. It really took off and, as someone mentioned, probably helped a lot of noobs like me!

    I am 53 years young and bought a "wrong" first bike in early 2010. The school of hard knocks told me it was too tall for me despite a seasoned motorcyclist guiding my choice.(There's another point a noob should watch out for!)

    You wonder if I am writing a book. Well you're close. A compilation of the good "from the street" information to REALLY help the new motorcyclist I feel is vitally needed. Does anyone have books/videos they know are available along these lines?

    I've been basically unemployed for about 2 years and have dreams of doing a seminar series or on-line video to help noobs. Anyone interested in partnering? Are you musical? I've also written a number of motorcycling-specific songs toward a touring band at festivals, expos, etc.

    Keep the good info coming for moto-noobs. They appreciate it!

    Tip: Be VERY wary of anything that might look slippery because it can get you: road apples, matted wet leaves, oil slick, mud, etc. You'll at the very least get a wiggle in your ass to tell you it was slippery!

    best,
    MotoMusicMark

    P.S. What's a "sticky thread" and a "Perfect line forum"??
  9. Bravo21

    Bravo21 Been here awhile

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    NOOB reporting in. I'm one of those late bloomers - 48 years old and have been riding for just 6 months. In that time I've ridden 4,000 miles between 2 different bikes. This is a massively helpful thread.

    The quote above came from the 1st page. It's succinct, direct, unemotional, and incredibly practical. It's also the one thing I have to regularly force myself to keep foremost in my mind when out for a ride on winding country roads. There are so many golden nuggets in this thread that deserve mention, especially regarding car drivers, conditions, lane position, gear, etc. The one above just resonated with me more than most others.

    If I could pass on anything I learned this year, it would be: start small. My first bike was a 250cc Kawasaki Super Sherpa. I put my first 3,000 miles on that bike, including a 1,500 mile, 6 day road trip. I learned basic skills and gained a ton of confidence. When I bought my 650 V-Strom 2 months ago, I felt ready to move up and begin the learning process all over again. Nice thing about starting with a small dual sport is that I now have a little dirt bike for learning some off-road skills.

    Then I would echo the other most helpful tips:
    - ATGATT. Don't go cheap, either. Buy the best stuff you can afford.
    - Ride YOUR ride. Stay within your skill level. Listen to the Dirty Harry in you. "A man's gotta' know his limitations."
    - Learn to brake. Then learn it again, again, and again.
    - Practice, practice, practice (ride, ride, ride).

    Thanks to all who have shared their long years of experience with noobs like me. This thread is a treasure.
  10. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    I had two things, but rightnow can only remember one...

    COMMUNICATION; I live in a place where ravines can often accompany the road...

    And we've all seen or heard the stories about a overturned car and a person being trapped and not being able to call for help.

    Take your phone and put it INSIDE your jacket pocket. Put it in a place that's close, and protected... And the inside jacket pocket is it.

    Your wallet and keys and so fourth can't call for help if you're trapped under your bike, and if you put it in a bag that might land out of reach.

    Put your phone in the inside pocket of your jacket EVERY TIME you ride.
  11. Hookapelli

    Hookapelli Meat Popsicle

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    If you're not feeling your head is in the game for a ride... don't ride. All it takes is one moment of not paying attention and you're out.

    Take breaks on long trips- just because you can go 450+ miles on a tank doesn't mean you should.

    Practice, practice, practice.... always.

    Don't speed and get caught. If you get caught- joke with the cop about it... it seems to have worked for me a number of times.

    Only buy the accessories you need- people with a bunch of useless junk on their bike is just more room for distraction and problems.

    Check you tires... and then check your tires... and before you roll out, check your tires. (and don't buy cheap tires- do your homework).

    Wear gloves, they will hit the road first. Wear a helmet (that covers your face), that's what will hit the ground a split second after your hands.

    Get to know how your bike 'feels'... she'll let you know if something is wrong.

    HAVE FUN!!!! (That's what it's all about).
  12. ShardPhoenix

    ShardPhoenix Наглый ублюдок

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    Yep. That's me today.

    Crappy nights sleep, and although part of me thinks I'd be just fine to ride.. I'm opting to take the cage instead. It's one of those days where I'd prefer to not leave the house at all, but alas I must.
  13. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    Or at least a nice concussion of the ribs;

    coming to that :

    don't ride a bike with a non-working rear brake on serious gravel (or do it real slow)

    and some of the less expensive pants (at least around here) have knee protectors, but only empty protector pockets at the hips. Fill tose up ASAP if it's the case with yours.
    Lowsided on the deep gravel at about 15 mls only, but that hip hurt three weeks
  14. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    Damn DAKEZ, wtf phone do you ride with? In my variable broken ribs are better than a broken phone... Your ribs can't call for help if you're trapped or IMMOBILE under your bike.

    [​IMG]


    Ok, sorry... I'm a street rider... Sorry for the confusion.


    STREET RIDERS: Ride with your hopefully slim design phone, on the INSIDE of your hopefully PADDED and zipped up motorcycle riding jacket.


    There, hope that nails ALL the variables.
  15. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    I didn't say that I personally subscribe to it but I know several riders that will NEVER ride with anything like a phone or camera in their pockets (not even an Iphone) due to rib injuries they have sustained during a get-off.

    Me? I carry both a phone (like the one pictured above) and a Canon A590 point and shoot camera in my jacket pockets. (knock on wood)
  16. Animo

    Animo Beastly n00b

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    [​IMG]

    That would friggin hurt!
  17. dwoodward

    dwoodward Long timer

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  18. IheartmyNx

    IheartmyNx Ihave2draft

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    Well... That was the "inside" of the, "padded" variable. If it's behind the "pad" or other course outer-material, then therefore one can include the possibility of an off-parallel offy.

    And in a "trapped under your bike" (at the bottom of a ravine) scenario, it would meet the safety criteria of being both safely secured, and within reach for an easy call for help.


    And not only that, but the dispersal of pressure depending on the size of the object (phone) which one can divide the size of the alternate impact projectile, say in this instance a 7/8ths diameter motorcycle handlebar, multiplied my pie (3.14) then divided my the surface area of the alternate impact receiver (the phone) to calculate the decreased surface tension area of the otherwise direct impact.

    P = F/A

    [​IMG]

    Yes. Earplugs, spare change usually quarters for emergency gas, and a tire pressure gauge.
  19. high dangler

    high dangler Been here awhile

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    my best advise is stay away from group rides for a few years.
    To easy to get in over your head trying to impress.
    Us males have this testoserone thing working against us.
    Personally i know of way to many new riders crashing while trying to "keep up" Some of these newb were crippled for life Dont get suckered in.!

    Also do a track day. Its very easy to do nowdays. There is so much to be learned there .
    I think I learned more there in one day than 30 years on the street . You and your bike will do some things you didnt think possible.
  20. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    edited for safety. :D