Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    No, that's down in Jo Momma
  2. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

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    That is an idiotic statement. Noobs fare far better off-road than in traffic with cars, buses, an trucks. If you are scared to ride dirt, don't.

    Barry
  3. slide

    slide A nation in despair

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    Yours is a moronic and destructive statement.

    Motto of dirt riding:

    If you ain't falling, you ain't learning.

    It's one thing for a kid who is 12 to learn on dirt (good). It's another for an adult (bad).

    BTW, the adult already knows the way of buses, etc. Nobody comes to riding as a 40 year old (frex) who doesn't already drive a cage.

    Dirt == crippled adults.
  4. FishTaco

    FishTaco urban misfit

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    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Well put, Barry. Do you suppose there is any chance this bozo will finally back off and STFU?
  5. LittleRedToyota

    LittleRedToyota Yinzer

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    all my 40+ dirt riding buddies (including some who started after 40) and me must actually be in comas in the ICU at the local hospital. i guess i'm just dreaming all of this...

    noobs of all ages: just plain do not listen to slide. he has some axe to grind or just doesn't know WTF he is talking about. riding in dirt does not mean you will get hurt. you probably will drop your bike from time to time. you'll probably be going about 2mph when you do. you won't likely get hurt.

    you can ride dirt trying to emulate james stewart, and then you probably will crash hard. or you can ride within your abilities, and then you probably won't crash hard. what you will do is have a blast and greatly improve your riding skills...in ways that are directly applicable to the street if that matters to you.
  6. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    One point he does have that is valid: old bodies don't crash as well.

    If you are going to ride dirt, you are more than likely going to crash more often than you would on the street.

    Ergo, if you are going to ride dirt and you are getting up there in age, don't ride like a crazy asshole if you don't like hospitals.
  7. RevBill

    RevBill Irreverent Reverend

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    Y'all need to start your own "experienced" dickerin' thread and get off the Noobs thread ..

    .. unless ya'll are teachin' the new riders about bitchin' and opinions and callin' each other names .. yer doin' real good with that ..
  8. Gundy

    Gundy Been here awhile

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    After the state safety course I took, I would say I've learned more useful riding skills offroad than I would have merely riding around on the street within the confines of the law. Reflexes and reaction time for somewhat tricky traffic maneuvers were all made better by just a few weekends of offroad. Last fall on a Monday after a two day dual sport, I was able to avoid getting t-boned on my way home from work using reflexes I otherwise would not have had. It's all about honing that reaction time, which swerving around rocks, roots, ruts, and stumps definitely does. Worth paying in advance with a few bruises in my book. Just make sure you wear all the protective stuff and you ought to be ok at cautious noob speeds.
  9. swann

    swann Just practicing...

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    Lol!
  10. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    Well since no one had advice for gravel wash boards I went out and tried them on the back after it rained all day sunday .



    Advice from a noob to a noob , Rain soaked dirt/gravel road with washboards in the turns suck in the dark , Im guess in the light too :lol3
  11. RevBill

    RevBill Irreverent Reverend

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    .. lol Hawk .. you should join us at the What-the-hala Ride coming up in the Natahala area of North Carolina .. the Saturday Ride is lots of gravel roads and twisty mountain (paved) roads ..

    .. you might want to skip the Friday ride .. it's a bunch more off-road oriented (meaning you really need a dirt bike or some skillz with a big pig thumper to go where they go) .. though there will be a group of pigs riding around too ..

    .. my first trip out there was about six weeks after I bought my KLR last May .. I learned a TON about my bike and got some great experience and advice from the other riders ..
  12. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    Thanks , I bet I would learn a good bit . Thats a bit of a haul for me on my super sherpa though , even on the truck thats a good 5-6 hour ride . Yesterday I rode some ATV /horse trails then did a loop around the block , about 35 miles or so . The offroad /dirt riding skills do come in handy on the pavement . I was about home making a right turn onto another road and the engine died when clutched it to down shift so in mid turn I eased off the clutch to bump start it and the back end broke loose pretty hard , I hit the clutch again and then tried again this time with the bike a bit straighter and out of the fluff in the turn , it came around again , clutched it and tried again this time contact ,back running. If that would of happened to me last week before I started running offroad I think I would have panicked .


    When I got home I upped my idle a hair , I rejetted it last week so I must not have gotten the idle rpm on the money .
  13. Jon_PDX

    Jon_PDX Long timer

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    Good job keeping the bike under control.

    Just wondering.....why bump starting it instead of pulling in the clutch and hitting the started button?

    Jon...
  14. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    Thanks .

    Just a habit I guess from driving jeep and old farm trucks , rolling down a narrow va back road on a 77 c70 grossed out at 33,000 lbs its better to make the turn chunk it into gear and roll start it so you dont have to fumble with the key .
  15. nicola_a

    nicola_a Adventurer

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    Only ride a bike you are capable of handling. Sometimes just because it's L-plate approved (I'm in Aus, might be different elsewhere) doesn't mean you can just jump on and go.
  16. Jon_PDX

    Jon_PDX Long timer

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    That makes total sense.

    Thanks,

    Jon...
  17. Bogfarth

    Bogfarth Fridge Magnet Safety Tester

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    Being very much a n00b, any of the following would have helped...


    • Don't go getting in a hurry! Mentally, you're torching tires; trouble is, you ain't rolled three feet yet.
    • If you goof, most other drivers will understand an honest mistake. Recognize the test you failed, learn the lesson, and move on with grace.
    • You've got that familiar lump of keys in your pocket, but it don't matter. The key that makes it go zoom! is still in the bike. (only done this a hundred and sixty one times.)
    • That MSF card qualifies you to ride in a parking lot, not on the road. Fill the tank, take a day and fart around the neighborhood to find out what the world really looks like on two wheels. You'll be surprised what you were not taught.
    • You'll have rare moments of stark terror. Make sure you think through them. Panic, after all, is the response of the unprepared.
    • Try to keep your first motorcycle to 50-odd hp or less. Screwing up is easy enough; more power just makes the bike harder to learn and easier to break.
    • Counter-steering sounds like witchcraft, feels like driving backwards, and really does work. Hit a straight road and practice it at the wee hours of the morn.
    • Gas money lives as small bills in a jacket pocket (easy access, no fumbling with the wallet) your gear stays on while fueling, and place the gas cap in a strategic position. Lest you bump said hardware and then accidentally punt it across the filling yard. With your key.
    • Don't drop the bike to drive your bluetooth/ipod/GPS.
    • Inform people who make "asshole biker!" and "stupid crotch-rocket!" comments of the difference between riders, Pirates, and SQUIDs. They might even thank you for it.
  18. Hawk62cj5

    Hawk62cj5 2 Cheap 4 a KLR

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    More from a noob to a noob

    If say you are wearing a jacket , such as a mil surplus german gortex jacket , zip it up before hitting the road . The damn thing about yanked me off the bike when the wind caught it running a little over 50 .:rofl
  19. superslomo

    superslomo Adventurer

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    I started this thing comparatively late (in my 30's), and the only time I've been down was on dirt, and it sucked pretty hard. No major damage to me (bruising, minor strain) and some to the bike.

    I would say if you can become a good dirt rider you'll learn more about being a good rider generally. You will, probably, possibly, maybe fall a heck of a lot sooner learning on dirt, and you should hope you don't bust something. At 30/40/50 your ability to withstand getting thrown into a pile of rocks at even 10 mph is less robust than when you are 12, and you'll be on a more substantial bike to boot.

    If you aren't scared about biffing a few times, I can see dirt being a good training ground: the advantage is that you have to deal with more challenges, but when you screw up at least there won't be a semi there to run you over.

    That said, the practice of riding on the street will make it less likely that you wreck repeatedly, so there's that as an upside.

    To the person above who said that this is safe stuff, it's important to acknowledge that we can make it safER, but I know for a fact when I got out on the road that I'm taking a greater risk to life and limb than I would getting in the car. I do my best to be judicious, so I can make it home to my wife and kid, but you can't guarantee anything in life... a minor car accident would probably be a major motorcycle accident, in terms of injuries. It is what it is...
  20. slide

    slide A nation in despair

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    The only indication that dirt riding makes for better street riding is in the broken minds of those whose broken bodies are veterans of dirt riding while kids.

    I'll repeat - there is NO skill for street riding you learn on the dirt. None. Street riding is about lane placement, traffic reading and so forth. Dirt riding is about "if you ain't falling, you ain't learning".

    Consider yourself lucky that your dirt riding experience didn't cripple you.