Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. BikeMan

    BikeMan smoke, drink, screw, ride

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    safest place to ride is where the cagers are not. the hills & twisties and or off road. cagers hate that kind of stuff. most mc accidents 90% happen at slow speeds. avoid slow speeds, city traffic, traffic jams, etc..
  2. slide

    slide A nation in despair

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    The UK study shows your information isn't just wrong, but laughable.
  3. Mile Maker

    Mile Maker Been here awhile

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    Things i learned (mostly the hard way) in my first 5 years of riding.

    ATGATT ( all the gear, all the time) because its not IF you crash, Its When you crash! At least when you ride in the dirt.

    If you are headed to the dirt, Have good tires. Period. 90% street 10% dirt tires, are useless for the places you really want to go. Once the front end looses traction, you crash. Its cheaper to wear out some good tires, than it is to replace that plastic you just broke.

    Air down your tires when riding the dirt. This will add traction, and confidence. But remember to air back up when you hit the black top again. I carry a small 12v air compressor

    Set up your suspension properly. Most adventure bikes have an adjustment to set up rear suspension height. Its amazing how much a rear suspension adjustment will have on the handling and feel of the bike.

    Cagers don't see bikes, they will look directly at a bike, and not see it. This is especially true at night. Bikes with only one headlight are hard to see, when surrounded by all the other lights in the city.
    Add an aux headlight. use it as a daytime running light. It will help you be seen.

    Always assume that you are not seen by cars. Stay out of blind spots. Leave yourself an exit strategy in every situation.
    Don't be afraid to flash your brights at people that you suspect don't see you. This will grab their attention.
    Also, flash your brake light a couple of times when you are compression braking, in order to grab the attention of the people behind you.

    When riding solo, Ride near the center line. This is the best place to be seen by other traffic.

    slow down for blind corners. They often hide pot holes, ruts, or some other obstacle that you wouldn't want to hit.
    Only ride at a rate speed that you can stop in time to avoid a collision.

    Don't listen to your iPod when driving. It will distract you. When you ride on dirt, or surrounded by cars, You have a lot of things to pay attention to already, You don't need music to distract you further.
  4. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Not when on a two lane highway it isn't. Being more to the fog line will help oncoming vehicles getting ready to pull out and pass a better chance of seeing you. (And give you a better chance of avoiding them if they don't)

    One should NEVER adhere to ANY hard and fast rule about lane position when riding. Be fluid and be seen.
  5. BikeMikeAZ

    BikeMikeAZ n00b

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    When I was 17, those tires looked GREAT on that 72 CB360. 10 minutes later, shorts, a t-shirt, and the guard rail bouncing off my helmet wasn't so great. Didn't break anything, but spent 3 hours in the tub with a scrub brush getting gravel out of my forearms and thighs. Before I could drink. Painful. At least Mr. Happy was unscathed.
    I didn't read all 95 pages of posts, so sorry if this is a redo: your tires have only a given amount of traction 'budget' for any given situation. Use too much for turning, and you don't have enough for stopping, or vice versa.
    The noob version of this might be 'Don't try to turn and stop at the same time'. Practice to determine how much turning and braking you can do.
    Loads of other good stuff here. Thanks for letting me join the fun.:clap
  6. Mile Maker

    Mile Maker Been here awhile

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    yes, i was referring to a double lane road, but failed to say that.

    Riding on the line, in a double lane road allows you to be seen by mirrors of cars in front of you, and less likely to be missed by a shoulder check.

    As like you said. Be where you can be seen.
  7. bush pilot

    bush pilot Long timer

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    The number one thing to remember; expect the unexpected!
    I'm sure someone else mentioned this, it bears mentioning again and again. "Expect the unexpected". There ya go I just saved at least one persons life.
    Also respect your lucky escapes, not everyone is so lucky.

    Sent from my SM-T211 using Tapatalk
  8. nukeNpuke

    nukeNpuke n00b

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    Sorry if this was covered already i didnt see it by page 50 something. Dont ever let your helmet hit something. I use to pull in the garage and throw my helmet across the garage onto a chair, occasionally it would bounce off and hit the concrete. One day (early 90's) as always i pulled in and took of my helmet i threw it in the chair as always, and it bounced out, only to shatter on the ground. It was still intact, just spider cracked all over. Any head protection, hard hat, helmet, bump hat should be treated like eggs. If you drop it hard, you need to replace it. You cant see what all damage is already done, and one day you might need the 100% protection it has to offer. I climb cell towers for a living and i follow this same rule with my bump hat and hard hats. If i bump it on something hard or drop it its trash. No need for my son to have to deal with me being injured or killed because i ddint take care of my protective gear.

    Always wear gloves, sliding across pavement barehanded will end your ride.

    Dont show off, I dont care how sexy she is.

    If it isnt up to par dont ride. that goes for you, your equipment and your ride.

    Grow eyes in the back of your helmet. 17 years riding motorcross and dual sports and all my major wrecks were from behind me. Either a truck sliding into the back of my bike at a redlight or a rookie on the track landing on my back doing singles instead of doubles.
  9. Sidewise

    Sidewise Been here awhile

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    Pick your feet up!:D Your boots will last longer.
  10. sailorninja

    sailorninja Been here awhile

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    As a noob to riding, I have a curious question. Is it normal that I am slightly unsettled by turning sharply? I've only been riding in the yard on my ninja. But it feels as though it is going to slide out from under me. Im still practicing just curious if the feeling will go away? :confused:

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk 2
  11. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Riding in the yard (as in on grass?) it may very well slide out from under you. Get out of the yard and to a nice paved lot and practice there.

    When tires are cold they have less grip.
    Painted lines have less grip.
    Metal manhole/sewer covers have less grip.

    Outside of that. It will be a LONG time before you lean that bike more than traction allows.

    Also remember to lean your body into the turn. (don't just lean the bike)
  12. Ciph3r

    Ciph3r Adventurer

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    Definitely find an empty parking lot, your ninja is not made for grass ;) Your bike will feel totally different, if you try it on pavement.
  13. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    And you ARE wearing gear, even on grass, right? Ninjas are not made for grass, low traction and street tires do not mix. Find a nice empty parking lot to practice in- our neighborhood church parking lot is HUGE and usually empty. Except on Sundays.


    1911fan
  14. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked

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    Here's a thought; I've heard it said that riding off road gives you skills that will make you a better rider on the street. By having you ride on grass, you are hopefully learning responses to sudden loss of traction, with less chance of damage to the street bike in a fall. It's all well and good to learn in a parking lot, too, but in the real world, it's the patch of sand, the oil slick in the center of the lane, a wet manhole cover that will catch you. I think the skills learned on the grass may save you in that situation. What do you think? Also, get a jacket with shoulder and elbow armor. Your bones will thank you if you ever do take a fall.
  15. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Only if you're wearing it, which should be 100% of the time. I still say, get off the lawn or have him find you a small dirt bike to ride. My .02 is all.


    1911fan
  16. orangebear

    orangebear Long timer

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    i would get some better gear and then pay for some lessons and riding with a instructor on the road and then get your test done so you now what to do and be legal to run the bike.
  17. BikeMikeAZ

    BikeMikeAZ n00b

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    For parking lot speed turns, you can let the bike lean under you, instead of leaning with the bike. You'll feel a lot more in control.
    If you haven't done it yet, take a motorcycle safety foundation course. Even experienced riders learn a little something in those courses (take the boyfriend).
  18. geolpilot

    geolpilot Been here awhile

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    Read and study Proficient Motorcycling by Hough, then read it again! I learned a ton from it even after 50 years of riding.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
  19. cele0001

    cele0001 Instigator

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    Granted I only have about 8 years of riding experience but my thinking is that if motorcycle is involved in an accident it is always motorcycle's fault.
    Here is the logic.
    On a bike if you crash you will get hurt and possibly die.
    Therefore you should never put yourself in the situation to be in an crash, ever.
    You always have more to lose than the car. I don't even want to go into "unforced errors" subject (going too fast, hitting a tree, etc)
    Its one of those you always have to think two, even three steps ahead. I am hoping some of the older crowd will chime in (no offense).
    Also on a bike you reaction instinct are almost always wrong. You must train yourself to think more and react less.
  20. Ciph3r

    Ciph3r Adventurer

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    My thought on this is, train the right instincts and reflexes, because if you have to first think about how to react, it's already too late. But this is hard to learn and harder to get rid of old muscle memory/reflexes...