Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. DAKEZ

    DAKEZ Long timer

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    Loosely Translated he likely means that you should always ride slightly faster than the general flow of traffic. (for safety) :D
  2. sailorninja

    sailorninja Been here awhile

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    So, after I signed up for the Msf course, all was good until yesterday, get into the garage and attempt to crank my bike and realize she is having trouble starting/idling...AGAIN. The man I bought her from said she had cold start issues but they are nothing like the pain in the butt this has become. I'm wanting to practice and take the course and start riding and my bike is just like NO. Took out the carbs, cleaned them, replaced the oil filter and changed the oil and quite a few other things and she ran fine, started right up and everything was dandy, next morning she is at again. Not wanting to start or when she does, idle is a no no, unless you baby the throttle. I was so excited to get her but it's becoming a downer that every time I go to do ANYTHING with her, I can't. :confused: right now my carb is taking a pine sol bath in hopes that it cleans out whatever I possibly missed. Lots of little black stuff down in it, so I'm hoping that was the issue? As someone who knows pretty much nothing of motorcycle mechanics, I'm not too trusting of anything I THINK is going to work. I'm between bring sad and getting REALLY frustrated. :banghead:

    I'm open to suggestions.

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk 2
  3. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked

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    The "Lots of little black stuff down in it" is most likely the fuel line disintegrating. That would explain why it keeps showing up and plugging your idle jets even though "boyfriend took out the carbs, cleaned them". One of the first things I do on any new to me vehicle is replace the fuel lines (belts, hoses, etc) ASAP.
  4. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    could also be crap in the tank...
  5. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    The pilot jet is very small, if you don't have an inline fuel filter, get your SO to install one while he's replacing the fuel line (mentioned above). :nod

    [​IMG]

    From ProCycle
    [​IMG]
  6. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    Couldn´t agree more. What´s written above here, is one of the most important things that you need in order to survive. Always stay one step ahead, that means you have an alternative plan, if (or when) something unexpected happens.

    And I´m not saying you should always go very slowly, but do remember that your options (or alternative plans) are reduced, as speed increases.
  7. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    When following a vehicle on a two way street or one with intersections, the distance a motorcycle should leave to the vehicle ahead should be much more than if you're driving a car. If you ride at a normal car distance, a car coming in the opposite direction wanting to turn across the traffic, or waiting at a side intersection to enter or cross the traffic, can really only see the larger vehicle in front of you. If it is a truck you are following you will definitely be totally hidden. They will think there is nothing there and turn across straight into you.

    Traffic lights are particularly problematic where cars want to hot-foot it turning across a break in the traffic. You should leave a large enough gap so that you are clearly visible to vehicles ahead without the car or truck you are following hiding you in anyway what so ever. Behind a large vehicle this can be quite a gap you need to maintain, anything up to 3 or 4 normal car distances back.
  8. jimhaleyscomet

    jimhaleyscomet Adventurer

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    When you are a new rider limit the duration of your rides for a few months. Initially, after 30 minutes your concentration will start to slip. Later, after an hour or two your concentration will start to slip.

    Actually, I have been riding for years and I still don't like road rides that last more than 3 -4 hours. I often make 1 stupid mistake after I ride for 3 hours. Even if I take a short break every hour, the ability to ALWAYS compensate for others' stupid moves seems to deteriorate after a few hours.

    One time I missed a red light and almost ran it. Another time I passed stopped vehicles on the right to go ahead and turn right…. I should have waited till the light turned green.
  9. tommysmothers

    tommysmothers Flamesuit equipped

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    Price out everything before you start buying. Visit your local shops and look through their clearance racks. Some shops offer a discount for having taken MSF course. Try things on before buying.

    Your riding style and conditions should influence your purchasing decisions. Leather provides the best protection, but isn't as comfortable as textile or mesh in the heat. Also think about the visibility of the gear. Textile often comes in Hi-Viz and leather does not, but you can always throw on a $10 reflective safety vest.

    Do some searches on the web for "gear crash reviews" and "leather vs textile".
  10. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Go to the Flea Market.


    1911fan
  11. JRWooden

    JRWooden Long timer

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    Sign up for these guy's emails: http://www.motorcyclegear.com/
  12. brakedw

    brakedw Adventurer

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    So last Sunday I went for a group ride through the mountains and covered about 220 miles. By the end my fuel light had been on awhile and I was in a hurry to get home so I pushed my range limit and got home without a problem. At the time I had a msr fuel bottle on me in case I ran out. Well I had not ridden all week and decided to ride to work just to pick something up. I left my panniers and fuel bottle I the garage because my first stop was going to be a gas station a half mile away. I briefly thought of dumping my fuel bottle in the tank but really how much gas to you need to go 1/2 mile? Well apparently more than I had because I ran out at the bottom of a small hill 1/4 mile from my fuel bottle:(
    My wife was kind enough to bring me my fuel bottle without calling me stupid ( but I could see it in her eyes) so when gas is all around don't push your range
  13. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    What were the odds?! :huh
  14. Newbee21

    Newbee21 Adventurer

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    1) The first year of riding is when 90% of bike crashes happen.
    With a safety course the point is to get you into the 10% that
    never crash .

    2) If you have a 10.00 dollar head buy a 10.00 dollar helmet.
  15. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short guy

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    I would have quietly walked back for the gas and told no one.
  16. grub

    grub Requires Supervision

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    Momentum can be your best friend or your worst enemy

    Never ride so late you sleep through the sunrise

    and

    It's easier than you'd think to outride your headlights
  17. Jbone11 11

    Jbone11 11 Been here awhile

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    Never get complacent on the bike...Never. If its been said before...than it bears repeating.
    I've only ever had one "off" on the bike....I'll let you guess why.
    My2Cents
  18. Newbee21

    Newbee21 Adventurer

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    So After reviewing all these posts, Riding a motorcycle is
    like riding a horse. In that if you are riding at a race tract you
    don't want to be the only rider on a Clydesdale !!

    The proper bike to fit your needs can make a ride fun. Also
    maintaining the bike can be looked at as the same as feed and
    grooming your horse.

    The wind in your face and the feel of "you are in control" is what no
    one tells you about. Have fun and enjoy.
    :D:D
  19. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    ah, the old Bell helmet ad from the 60's
  20. SgtDuster

    SgtDuster Long timer

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    I'll forgive you since you're a noob but please stop parroting this inanity.