Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. Toddv

    Toddv Been here awhile

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    Also a trick that I have learned, especially effective with fog/moisture that collects on the outside of the shield, is to turn you head side to side a bit and it will blow the stuff off. When looking straight forward the wind doesn't help much.
  2. RagerToo

    RagerToo vroom vroom

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    "stealership" ?

    It's attitudes like this that make the world a rocky place to live in. People are in business to make money, not friends. Get over it.
  3. tjv

    tjv wannabe

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    OK I have daft question and it might not be the most important information to know, but here goes anyway. The thing with kidney belts, those are basically the same thing as weightlifters belt? That is useful (or somewhat useful), but often just used to show everyone that you ride (or lift weights). What I see here often is that people like to have the belt outside your clothing as well. T-shirt and kidney belt, a very good and safe look?
  4. eap

    eap El Adventurero Solitario

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    I love thumb squeegees like this:

    [​IMG]
    Available from Aerostitch. I have several gloves that also have integrated squeegees too.

    My experience with RainX and other chemicals has not been so good. The visor on my old Caberg delaminated after I used such a product - no proof, but suspect it was the chemical. Anyway, with the squeegee and sticking my head out from the windshield from time to time, just let it rain!
  5. LittleRedToyota

    LittleRedToyota Yinzer

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    rain-x does supposedly eventually harm plexiglass, but i've used it on my street helmet visor and not had any issues. it does make the rain drops just slide right off. definitely works from that standpoint.
  6. Merckx the Cannibal

    Merckx the Cannibal Been here awhile

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    I'm not sure, but maybe you're seeing people who are wearing back protectors? Some back protectors have a strap across the waist, as well as shoulder straps. Maybe you're seeing people who are wearing back protectors under their T-shirts, but with the waist strap exposed. Or maybe it's a German thing and not a North American thing and in that case, I'll just shut up.
  7. tjv

    tjv wannabe

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    Nah its just a kidney belt they wear. On top of their t-shirts, that being their only protection besides the helmet obviously. Must be a local Berlin thing then. Just recently moved here and started riding so cant really compare, but tend to see this daily. Just glad to hear that it is not more common thing.
  8. snacks

    snacks King Bull Bucker

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    Thanks all for the info!
  9. catweasel67

    catweasel67 RD04

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    It's pretty common. I see it a lot in the UK, Europe and in the US. Makes no sense to me.
  10. Toddv

    Toddv Been here awhile

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    Maybe it's just there to help with back pain?
  11. tokyoklahoma

    tokyoklahoma 75%has been 25%wanabe

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    It is fairly common for cruiser riders (especially hardtails) to need some support.
  12. TheBlurr

    TheBlurr Banned

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    I have not read the entire thread but a few key points

    25 percent of motorcycle accidents happen do to unskilled uneducated riders.
    I would be willing to bet it is at least double that but thati s what is confirmed according to the hurt report.

    Try not to ride at night, you have decreased visibility and in rural areas critters abound.

    Ride with at least one finger covering your front brake at all times if possible, but especially in traffic or in rural areas and times when critters are most likely.

    Ride slower than the speed limit in those areas and in decreased visibility.

    Bright colors saves lives.

    Nothing is certain and nothing wil guarantee your safety, but you can do many things to increase your odds of survival, the same as any activity.
  13. _Davi_

    _Davi_ Adventurer

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    I would point out an interesting statistic I learned a while back.... there is a huge bump in accidents among not the newest riders (because they're often extra careful) and not the longer riders (because they've got a bunch of experience and have learned better) but in that 2-5 years riding area. You know the one, where you don't feel like a noob anymore, you think you're an expert, and you start pushing that confidence and envelope until it too often breaks. So the lesson is don't get overconfident after a few years, m'kay? It'll bite ya!
  14. aldend123

    aldend123 Long timer

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    Isn't there always a reason to keep yourself in check? No matter the category?

    When you're new, you lack talent.
    When you're getting confident, don't overdo it.
    When you're really experienced, it becomes an odds game the more miles you ride, so you must continue to stay sharp and alert.

    Didn't screw up today? Don't worry, there's always tomorrow.
  15. Tubaman

    Tubaman Adventurer

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    A week ago I was on my way to work, late, and pushing it on a clear back road when the back wheel locked. It released almost straight away and cruised into a petrol station wondering why? Turns out oil was low. I got a small small taste of what could happen if the engine runs hot and sizes up.

    Simple tip - don't negect the oil or any fluid on the bike its enough to worry about Everything else on the road then have your own machine fail :ace:ace:ace
    jantomas likes this.
  16. MotorcycleAdvocates

    MotorcycleAdvocates Banned

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    [spam removed]
  17. Mickalmus

    Mickalmus Been here awhile

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    I have to go with Zender. Doing Q-Ride assessment in Oz I was not nervous but had some trepidation about it. The 3 sections above were covered, theory, practical, road ride in one assessment course.

    The key message was it's up to you to ride in a way that avoids accidents, be it leaving an appropriate gap, lane positioning in different situations, or slowing down more when needed, and awareness of who is around you, where you are riding into and making shoulder/head checks before merging or turning. Having the instructor say that it is is simple as this was helpful and I already had enough motorbike (offroad) and traffic experience to get it done.
    The tricky bit is applying all of the above in changing situations.

    The best thing I learnt was to look further through ahead, the more time I had to react, the smoother I was.

    Don't believe everything you read on the internet and over analyse your riding.
  18. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    :huh Might want to seriously rethink those, especially the second one.
  19. opticalmace

    opticalmace Been here awhile

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    What's wrong with them?
    The first one can be useful when going through an intersection, and the latter helps keep traction in corners...
  20. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    So you sit behind a big truck and feel safe that people will see the truck. Yes they're far more likely to see the truck/van or car than some piddly small motorcycle, that's the very trouble. The only thing a driver waiting at the intersection or worse the driver coming from the opposite direction and wanting to turn across the traffic will see, is one bloody great big truck. They make their decision that as soon as the truck passes they will turn, they are committed and act, straight into the following 'invisible' motorcycle. Even at a two second gap your essentially invisible behind a large vehicle to anyone forward of the vehicle. Cars not seeing a motorcycle because it is 'hidden' (both real and illusion) by the vehicles in front of it is one of the major reasons for motorcycles getting taken out. A beginner rider is far safer out in the open, riding defensively, with attention given to maintaining their own high visibility to forward traffic.

    The merits or otherwise of a statement "always keep power on the back wheel in corners" was debated to death in the thread on MSF and trail braking. I see no value in covering it again.