Moto Camping - Cooking Gear

Discussion in 'Australia' started by dunno_where, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. dunno_where

    dunno_where 130km open roads!

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    315
    Location:
    Darwin, NT, Australia
    Has this been done?? I googled and could really find what i was looking for. :(:

    What are the Australian riders using for cooking?

    Tell me what you have from the Heximine stove to the Gas Stove with solar powered rangehood. :huh

    Pictures, pros and cons of your cooking, eating, drinking setup. Whats worth getting and whats worth leaving in the shop.
    #1
  2. Crofty

    Crofty Life's a Garden, DIG IT!

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    627
    Location:
    Launceston, TAS
    I really like my jetboil.
    #2
  3. Tfos1

    Tfos1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    227
    The Jetboil rocks!
    #3
  4. BBRadar

    BBRadar Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    120
    Location:
    Brisbane, Aus
    I've been using this pepsi can home made setup for motorbike and hiking trips.
    Stove is chimney type made out of Pepsi cans with V can reservoir. Some scrap mesh for pot stand.
    Pros: Runs on metho, very light, efficient, CHEAP, compact (fits in pot)
    Cons: fragile so store in pot (it's lasted me years), some consider slow to cook
    Other: Requires simmer lid (smaller chimney hole) to simmer
    I've just replaced this homemade stove with the Weenie gram pro which is a side burner design. I've tested it but haven't cooked on it yet. It's sturdier and more compact (doesn't require pot stand).

    [​IMG]

    Cooking on these little burners isn't bad - I do all my cooking/eating/drinking in the one pot to save weight/space. You can cook some pretty decent meals in one pot, or you can just fall back on the premix backcounty meals that just need hot water.
    These stoves are really not that slow - can still get a cup of water boiled in 5 minutes.
    #4
  5. lentil

    lentil All round nice guy Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10,347
    Location:
    Not Gunnedah
    I had a jetboil but found it limited in terms of anything other than 2 minute noodles so have gone for a dual fuel.stove with msr cook wear
    #5
  6. Fogo72

    Fogo72 I Bleed Green

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,568
    Location:
    NSW
    I go for the $10 special metho stove from BCF and the custom 2mm staino BBQ plate that sits on top of my rear fuel tank when traveling, wouldn't even know it was there.
    Cheers Fogo...:lol3

    Attached Files:

    #6
  7. DirtWanabe

    DirtWanabe Classic Adv Bike rider

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    188
    Location:
    Berry, NSW Australia
    I use a Trangia. The small one is a good size for one to two people. Simering with the metho stove can be tricky but you get used to it ok. Tried the gas and multi fuel add ons (Optimus nova+) but the metho burner is just so simple and effective.

    I've cooked all sorts of things on the Trangia, made some chicken with chilli & basil from scratch at the Trout rally and I've done Fettecini bosciola at the TTT a couple of years back.

    Good food is so much better than two minute noodles when your camping.

    Cheers, Dave.
    #7
  8. *nick*

    *nick* lost.

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    420
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    for the metho stove users, with a set up like BBRadar's: say you're using something like the Gram Weenie Pro how many times would you need to add metho to the flame to boil 1L of water? seems like a quick, light & simple way to carry and using cooking gear but I'm just wondering how hard it'd be to control temperature and such.
    #8
  9. jacksonracingcomau

    jacksonracingcomau Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    532
    I prefer vegetarians but not the skinny ones, they taste a bit gamey, better a bit plump. Cooked slowly
    #9
  10. Storm Shadow

    Storm Shadow Thread Ninja

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,523
    Location:
    Arashikage Clan
    I always use to use this ww2 Remake mess kit, metho stove, works well, boils slow though.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Now i just upraded to this fancy elcheapo propain canister cooker, its got a pizo ignition, a few bucks on ebay, boils quickly, after seeing a mate on my last bikeathon camping. i have some square alu mess pans, or just use the pans from the old one. yet, to test it out properly yet.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    but i have been looking at buying something like this, as i like the idea of just a kettle, add hot water etc for tea coffee noodle cups, no cleaning of it. http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/New-3in1...32?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item19c690b720
    #10
  11. Matt

    Matt Dirt Virgin

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    Apr 11, 2007
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    2,118
    Location:
    Newtown,Sydney
    Nice pillow, got the matching PJ's?
    #11
  12. BBRadar

    BBRadar Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    120
    Location:
    Brisbane, Aus
    1L is a fair bit of water for a small stove like the ones I use - if you needed that much I'd say go for a bigger stove.
    On my old one 500ml of water is about 10 minutes and I generally wouldn't need to refill for this much water. I've made quite a few different drink can stoves and some have had lower fuel capacity which would need refilling - probably only once. To refill you need to wait till it's gone out completely.

    Just tested the Gram Weenie Pro and 1L of water (had to use a pot from the kitchen) - refilled it once, and it only used less half the second load of fuel (each load was 30ml metho) so ~40ml total. Time was 20-22mins including priming and refill. This was to get a decent boil.
    #12
  13. tHEtREV

    tHEtREV Captain Awesome... tEAM iDIOT.

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,999
    Location:
    Middle Park, Brisbane, Australia
    Looks like the one I got to replace my expensive ($70+) one that I lost.

    Worked great up until my Tassie trip, and then the auto lighter thingy was hard to start and the arms became very stiff...

    So stiff that I left them extended for the entire trip.

    Might have to give them a spray with lube after use...
    #13
  14. Uncle Crumpet

    Uncle Crumpet Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    775
    Location:
    Eidsvold, QLD
    i love cooking in aluminium, but I can never remember the meal or where i left it!:evil
    #14
  15. Storm Shadow

    Storm Shadow Thread Ninja

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    Location:
    Arashikage Clan
    matching bed spread actually :-)

    got the double, and a single for my daughters one
    #15
  16. ontic

    ontic

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,317
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I absolutely love my old Svea 123. It is tough, simple, charming and works very well from a hot steak sizzling burn to a pretty decent gentle simmer.
    Runs very well on shellite and very important for me it runs perfectly OK on petrol. Mostly I take a bottle of shellite at the start of a trip and finish on petrol if the trip is long enough.
    In side by side use, coffee to coffee, steak to steak, etc, with a friends 'Gaz' cylinder cooker (sort of visible in the background below) I calculated the cost difference between the two systems and even using shellite (instead of the much cheaper petrol) it was a factor over 1000%.

    Lighting or 'priming' requires basically dousing the top in a cap full of fuel and torching the thing, which is fun, not advisable inside a tent, and easy to get the hang of. At a particular setting of the 'throttle' I can get it purring along and sounding just like an airhead boxer:D

    If you don't know the stove it is worth a google- I was weighing up between the variety of modern MSR type multi fuel stoves, lightweight (typically pretty fragile) and runs on a variety of fuels, and then I found the reviews on this old Svea stove and like just about every other user I very happy with my choice. Old school and practical at the same time is very much my thing though.

    [​IMG]

    Of course, nothing beats a camp fire and cast iron hotplate.

    [​IMG]
    #16
  17. dunno_where

    dunno_where 130km open roads!

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    315
    Location:
    Darwin, NT, Australia
    I did the same thing... I should have known better.

    It didn't have the little Australian Gas Certified sticker on it. I used mine the night it arrived. Worked fine. I walked away from it for less than a minute, come back and the f***ing thing is up in bright orange flame engulfing the billy i had boiling water on. I grabbed a bucket of water and drowned the bloody thing until the flame went out.

    No Gas Certificate - don't even bother. :nono

    Hence now I'm asking the question about camp cookers.

    I've been looking at the Trangia sets. Safe, small, reliable, and cheep to run. (From what I've read)
    #17
  18. Miss Jane

    Miss Jane Ride like a girl

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,120
    Location:
    Central Victoria
    Sometimes cook on a stove, sometimes on the fire. So jet boil pots are out, when I can remember foil wrapped vegies, feta cheese with a sprig of thyme etc are in.

    We take either my MSR Simmer light stove, runs on shellite. Shellite is very useful for degreasing and cleaning engine casings when applying metal putty over holes or cracks!

    Or we take the MSR Whisperlite International which runs on shellite or unleaded fuel - burns a bit dirty on the later, but a very handy back up.

    Both stoves nice and quiet, quick to boil.

    Rarely have to service/clean stoves in the field, but should you need to it's easy and they pull totally apart.

    Very reliable, no problems in years and years, and they get used a lot as they are our only camping stoves and we camp often.

    We find them efficient on fuel.

    Light weight, compact, quick to use and reliable even in the most disgusting weather.

    Aluminium pots can make food stick, non-stick is no good when not carrying detergent and using sand/dirt to clean out pots. We have a couple of misc pots made of stainless and a really big aluminium pot for one pot meals on cold wet Tassie bush walking trips.
    #18
  19. Miss Jane

    Miss Jane Ride like a girl

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    Mar 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,120
    Location:
    Central Victoria
    Excellent stoves, nothing on them to go wrong. They do take a long time to cook though.
    #19
  20. Storm Shadow

    Storm Shadow Thread Ninja

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    Location:
    Arashikage Clan
    scary if they catch fire, ill be cooking away from my bike nd tents on it now i thinks
    #20