Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX Valve Adjustment Procedure

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by leafman60, Jul 29, 2012.

  1. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,589
    This applies to both flat-tappet and roller-tappet engines.

    Start by blowing all loose dirt or grime away before loosening any fasteners or parts. This helps avoid debris finding its way into the internals.
    [​IMG]


    Next, pry out the little Moto Guzzi emblems. This may take more effort than you would think if you had good dealer prep. My dealer mechanic had added some glue to the underside of the emblems to avoid the common problem of lost emblems. I used a thin-blade utility knife as a prying tool and worked the emblem out. You have to get it up and then pull it loose from the glue. I know that I'm kinda anal sometimes but I applied blue tape so as not to mar the plug wire retainer when I pried out the emblem.
    [​IMG]


    This is what the little emblem looks like from behind. The blob of glue is in the background. Once the embem is out, you remove the retaining screw and the small spark plug wire cover piece.
    [​IMG]


    Next is removal of the spark plug boot from the plug. Much has been written about this and several people have mutilated a plug wire/boot trying to remove it from the plug. Be careful. The shop manual says to insert a screwdriver through the rear fin opening and pry the boot up. This is easier said than done. The throttle body and the injector kinda get in the way. Some have better luck inserting the screwdriver from the exhaust side of the cylinder.

    I discovered that I could grab the boot and rotate it left and right several times to break loose its seal to the valve cover. Then, by twisting it a bit further the shoulder of the boot rides up on the valve cover with the effect of pulling the boot off the plug. Help it with your fingers and it comes right off. You can also slip a nylon zip-tie or a piece of strong twine etc around the boot head and pull it off.
    [​IMG]


    Then take a long socket extension and a thin wall socket to reach the spark plug. This is the same size socket as used to remove the plugs on the current BMW boxers. I use a Duralast 16mm deep that I bought from Autozone Parts. If the wall of the socket is too thick, the socket will not go down into the valve cover.
    [​IMG]


    My socket did not have a rubber retainer inside so, once the plug was loose, I removed it from the well with a telescopic magnet.
    [​IMG]


    Next, remove the valve cover retaining bolts. Rubber washers are under them.
    [​IMG]


    Then, remove the plastic heat guard that covers the rear of the valve cover and lift away the valve cover.
    [​IMG]


    Just look at those easy-to-adjust rocker arms. Ducati people, eat your hearts out.
    [​IMG]


    The valve cover gaskets are rubber and re-useable after wiping clean.
    [​IMG]


    Now, we have to get the piston to top-dead-center on the compression stoke so that all valves will be closed and the rocker arms off the heel of the cam with the valve lash present. You can manually turn the rear wheel with the transmission in gear or you can put a 24 mm socket on the front crank nut.

    First, pry off the rubber plug on the front of the engine to reveal the nut. Then use the socket and ratchet to turn the engine.
    [​IMG]


    There are marks on the flywheel, as with all Guzzi models, to indicate when each piston is at TDC but they are not as obvious as on the older engines. You may want to paint a white mark on the flywheel once you have the proper TDC position. First, remove the rubber plug on the rider's right side behind the motor.

    [​IMG]


    Another way to find TDC, upon which I relied, is to insert something soft like a soda straw into the spark plug hole to rest on top of the piston and move with the piston. You just turn the engine with the wrench and watch the soda straw until it shows the piston reaching the top of its stroke.

    On the anal side, I like to come to rest at TDC as the crank would normally turn and not have to back it up to rest at my adjustment point. The theory here is to have the cam chain taut and not let any cam chain slack interfere with your adjustment points. The engine crank turns in a clockwise direction if you are standing in front of the bike and looking back at the front of the motor. Looking in the flywheel peephole, the normal direction of rotation would show the flywheel moving upward.

    Remember that you want the piston at TDC on the compression stroke. You can watch the valves to figure this out. When the piston comes to the top and all four valves are closed, that's what you want. You can verify this by grabbing the rockers and shaking them. You'll feel them a little loose. You can also double-check by looking for the flywheel mark.
    [​IMG]


    Before using the feeler gauges to check the lash, I like to squirt a little cleaner solvent (brake cleaner etc) on the lash joint to clean-out any oil that may interfere with a good gauge feel. After completing the valve adjust, squirt a little oil back into the valve lash gap. Intake is .006 inch, .15 mm. Exhaust is .008 inch, .20mm. *** edit 2-2-16 Current factory spec's, even for the roller tappet engines or roller conversions, remain at .006 and .008.***
    [​IMG]


    The intake valves are on the rear, near the intake. Exhaust valves are on the front where the exhaust pipe is.

    This is a procedure held over from my many years of BMW valve adjusting. BMW recommends checking clearances with two feeler gauges at once. The theory is that slop in the rocker shaft can alter your readings so you want to insert a feeler gauge on both valve trains to take out such free play. I don't know if it's worth the trouble but I am used to doing it.

    You still check and adjust each valve separately but you do so with a feeler gauge on the other valve while you're doing it. You can also try to bridge one feeler gauge blade across both valves.
    [​IMG]


    Now, we do the exhaust. So simple. Loosen the lock nut, adjust the allen stud. You do have to play with it. When you tighten the lock nut, your clearance may change a wee bit due to pulling the slack out of the threads. You'll have to back it off and work it until you get what you want after tightening down the lock nut. Play with it and you'll get it correct. You want a slight drag on the feeler gauge. If you are in doubt, take the next size up feeler gauge and see if it will go in your gap. If it does, you had them too loose. Of course, remember- too loose, is better than too tight.
    [​IMG]


    Another look at the exhaust side after we have adjusted both valves to proper spec.
    [​IMG]


    After one cylinder is completed, you move to the other side and repeat the procedure outlined above. Get the piston to TDC and be sure all valves are closed and you can feel slack in the rockers that you'll be adjusting.

    In keeping with being very detailed, I like to squirt a little oil back into the adjusted joints after the lash adjustment is completed.

    Wipe the valve cover gaskets clean and replace them on the cylinder head.
    [​IMG]


    Before replacing the spark plugs, examine them. Clean or replace if necessary. Guzzi uses the twin point plugs like BMW. I like to dab a wee bit of anti-seize compound on the threads.
    [​IMG]


    Insert the plug into the well with your plug socket or, as shown here, the extension magnet. Torque plug to specs.
    [​IMG]


    I like to lube up the interior and exterior of the plug boot with some dielectric grease to ease that boot removal procedure we discussed at the beginning.
    [​IMG]


    Position the valve cover on the head.
    [​IMG]


    After replacing the plastic heat guard, rubber washers, valve cover screws, and the spark plug wire cover, add a dab of silicone or some sort of glue to hold down that little MG emblem and re-insert the emblem.
    [​IMG]


    That's all there is to it.
    #1
    Vt-Stromer and playinatwork like this.
  2. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey 99% bullshitter...the other 1% is just lies

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,962
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, CA, USA, Earth
    Thanks for the great tutorial Leaf, but your image code is all wonky 'cause your pics aren't showing up. :waysad

    -SM
    #2
  3. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,589
    Computer issues. Cannot delete or edit initial post. Look at post below.



    Edit by pilot: First post fixed.
    #3
  4. boxermoose

    boxermoose Now fully goosed

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,960
    Location:
    Gulf Coast TX
    I've got the lash spec at XXXXX inlet and XXXXXX exhaust for the newer A8 motors such as your 2012NTX
    #4
  5. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,589
    My new shop manual says .006 and .008 inch for the NTX.
    #5
  6. boxermoose

    boxermoose Now fully goosed

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,960
    Location:
    Gulf Coast TX
    As an addendum to my original post (which I edited so nobody would use what I had in error) - if you have downloaded the available 2011 Euro repair manual it shows 2 different ranges

    Under the specs in the front few pages it shows the values Leafman has used which I assume are correct

    If you look at Valves under the maintenance section it shows a clearance of lesser value

    I'd hope that Leafmans 2012 version has been corrected

    BTW - nice series of how to's - we all appreciate your attention to detail
    #6
  7. RefJeff

    RefJeff Is it Friday yet?

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    261
    Location:
    South Central PA
    Another good way to remove the loosened spark plug is to push a length of hose, such as a fuel line, over the top of the plug. You can spin the plug the rest of the way loose and easily pull it out.
    #7
  8. RideDualSport.com

    RideDualSport.com TPB all the way

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,879
    Location:
    Texas at large.
    Nicely done! Thank you for posting the valve adjustment, I enjoyed it.
    I learned some tips and tricks. I like the straw method for finding TDC.
    #8
  9. Thinc2

    Thinc2 Paciugo

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,753
    Location:
    Seattle
    Awesome write-up - thank you.
    #9
  10. Thinc2

    Thinc2 Paciugo

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,753
    Location:
    Seattle
    Mods - this is inthe wrong forum - can we get it moved to Moto Bellisima please?
    #10
  11. kirb

    kirb should be out riding

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,050
    Location:
    Musky, MI
    #11
  12. RedHawk47

    RedHawk47 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    732
    Location:
    Berthoud, CO
    NGK's website says "do not use anti-seize". Two reasons:
    1. It's not needed. The "silver colored" plating on the threads makes anti-seize unnecessary.
    2. Use of the anti-seize can result in over-tightening because of the lubricating properties.

    Warning: there is a chart of torque specs for Stelvios on the web that lists the torque for spark plugs at 30 Nm (22lbf-ft). This is 3x too much. Don't ask me how I know.
    Torque spec per NGK is 10 to 12 Nm (7.2-8.7 lbf0ft).
    #12
  13. WitchCityBallabio

    WitchCityBallabio Guzzi weirdo

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,398
    Location:
    Salem, Massachusetts
    The flat tappet motors were .10mm and .15mm

    That's probably what the discrepancy was.
    #13
  14. barbarosa

    barbarosa Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    58
    Location:
    Colorado
    from the manual... valve clearance on exhaust should be depending on motor

    a5 is 0.15 mm or 0.0059
    a8 is 0.20 mm or 0.0079

    intake is the same on either motor... 0.10 mm or 0.0039
    #14
  15. Boulder Ed

    Boulder Ed Bin Ridin

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,208
    Location:
    Hutto,TX barely warm in the summer
    Humm gonna need to chase down the spec and go do this today or tomorrow on my 3400 mile 2013 bike.
    #15
  16. Crazy Legs

    Crazy Legs Let's Ride!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Oddometer:
    199
    Location:
    Central S.C.
    You Moto Guzzi guys are getting me to rethink my next purchase in the Spring from what I had in mind to the Stelvio. Keep it up please.
    #16
  17. RedHawk47

    RedHawk47 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    732
    Location:
    Berthoud, CO
    a5 =?
    a8 =?
    years? model?
    Thanks
    Dan
    #17
  18. Open Gate

    Open Gate Shhh She still thinks I'm out in the garage.

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Oddometer:
    51
    Location:
    Alberta Canada
    Great info, .. as I'm new to the MG clan can someone tell where to down load the service manual?
    #18
  19. kirb

    kirb should be out riding

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,050
    Location:
    Musky, MI
    http://www.guzzitek.org/

    You are going to want to English versions (GB)
    #19
  20. Doc.

    Doc. Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Oddometer:
    428
    Location:
    South BUCKS UK
    First two digits of your Engine number Dan.
    Left side of Crankcase, just above the front of the Side-stand mount plate.


    I thought my '09 would be an A5, but it's an A8.
    #20