Moto Trek'n to New York via the Trans Labrador Hwy

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by moto-treks, Sep 13, 2010.

  1. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    Well, a slight delay might be in order, due to cracking some ribs when taking my KTM 400 out for a spin :huh
    #21
  2. Ladybug0048

    Ladybug0048 Bug Sister

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    Yikes, sorry you're injured. Hope you heal quickly.
    #22
  3. C-Stain

    C-Stain Long timer

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    Not specifically the folks between Labrador and Quebec...try Quebec an the rest of the Country.

    In Quebec its ILLEGAL to display a language other than French on any sign. The Quebecois consider themselves a distinct society and have been petitioning for years to break away from Canada and form their own Nation. Try searching the 1993 (?) Referendum. You will find French Signs in parts of Nova Scotia, as well as Gaelic and New Brunswick is the only Bilingual Province where you will find signs in French and English.
    #23
  4. Baldone1

    Baldone1 I like It Dirty

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    Well, a slight delay might be in order, due to cracking some ribs when taking my KTM 400 out for a spin :huh



    Was tequila involved again?:nod
    #24
  5. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    Before or after :rofl
    #25
  6. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    I had dinner in Labrador City and then rode another 50km towards Churchill Falls before stopping to find a camping spot.

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-9.jpg">

    My luck with the back flies ran out at this camp. No sooner that I stopped then they started sharpening their teeth and warming up their engines. Within seconds they were swarming all around me as I madly rushed to setup the tent. I had not taken off any riding gear, so once the tent was setup, I found myself inside wearing gloves, boots and helmet. 30 minutes later and I had killed all the flys in the tent and had removed my riding rear - it was only 6:30 in the evening. Man, it was going to be a long night.

    It was cold that night and I woke to a frosty camp - and no flys!

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-10.jpg">

    But, the day was fantastic! First sunny day in a long time.

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-11.jpg">

    Local fishing camp

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-12.jpg">

    and about 540km to Goose Bay

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-13.jpg">

    The gravel along this highway was smooth and well packed, nothing like the gravel in Patagonia. I wish I has stopped in Patagonia to take a closer look at the gravel, but I'm guessing it would of looked like a river bottom because it was like riding on marbles - nothing like this highway.

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-14.jpg">

    This is what's left of the Churchill River

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-15.jpg">

    The river has been reduced to this by the Churchill Falls generating station, which supplies electricity for Quebec City. Just imagine what it was like before electricity.

    It's hard to tell the size of this river (it was big), but here is a close-up of the little falls that are in the middle of the last picture

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-16.jpg">

    It would be difficult to cross the Churchill River river by foot today!

    The town of Churchill Falls has one gas station, a restaurant, and a bar. It's purpose is to house the people that work at the generator station. After lunch I was off for the push to Goose Bay.

    The Highway scenery dons't change much.

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-17.jpg">

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-18.jpg">

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-19.jpg">

    Just before arriving at Goose Bay you reach pavement again

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/TransLab-20.jpg">

    The plan is to pave the highway from Labrador City to Goose Bay in the coming years.
    #26
  7. Ladybug0048

    Ladybug0048 Bug Sister

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    Well???? How are those ribs doing? Time to work on this again? I'm waiting :ddog Must be power tools. :lol3
    #27
  8. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    Much better :D

    I do need to finish this RR - sorry for the delay :huh Lets see if I can do it this week :deal
    #28
  9. SkinnyPedal

    SkinnyPedal Not So Skinny

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    :ear

    Looking forward to the rest of this one. :wink:
    #29
  10. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    First off, sorry for the delay - Lets see, just were was I - oh yeah, just arriving at Goose Bay in the late afternoon. The weather was great the whole day - nice and clear and not that cold; the best day of the whole trip :D What a great riding day and the end of the Trans Labrador Highway.

    Goose Bay is where I'll stop for the night as the next leg is too far without services and I wanted a place to dry out the tent. Tomorrow, I'd be starting off on the Labrador Coastal Drive

    [​IMG]

    and about 390 kms without anyplace to fill a tank.

    [​IMG]

    The next section of highway, after Goose Bay, is the newest highway in Labrador.

    <iframe width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" src="http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;source=s_q&amp;hl=en&amp;geocode=&amp;q=http://www.moto-treks.com/tracks/Labrador_Coastal_Drive.kmz&amp;sll=52.935397,-59.007568&amp;sspn=5.391495,14.27124&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=53.166534,-58.688965&amp;spn=3.161693,7.03125&amp;z=7&amp;output=embed"></iframe><br /><small><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;source=embed&amp;hl=en&amp;geocode=&amp;q=http://www.moto-treks.com//tracks//Labrador_Coastal_Drive.kmz&amp;sll=52.935397,-59.007568&amp;sspn=5.391495,14.27124&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;ll=53.166534,-58.688965&amp;spn=3.161693,7.03125&amp;z=7" style="color:#0000FF;text-align:left">View Larger Map</a></small>

    This section was just opened at the beginning of the year. Before, you had to either take a ferry to St Barbe, Newfoundland or Blanc Sablon, Quebec, or turn around. Now, you can ride another 650+ kms through the coastal region of Labrador as you head to Blanc Sablon and the ferry to Newfoundand.

    But first, I have a hotel to find, a dinner to eat, and a few pints of beer to drink :1drink
    #30
  11. gongnomore

    gongnomore Tetley

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    Good pictures, shame we didn't get one of your "marble road". Keep plugging on, looks like a great adventure and watch out for those Canadians ey!
    #31
  12. Ladybug0048

    Ladybug0048 Bug Sister

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    Enjoy the Hotel and your beer then come back and tell us the rest of the story. :beer
    #32
  13. Thorne

    Thorne Sherpa-ing around

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    :lurk
    #33
  14. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    Oh I did, both last night and on the trip.

    It was a little funny as I'd been camping out for a few days with each night getting colder. On the night before I got to Goose Bay, it was really cold. Like, put on all your clothes, crawl into you sleeping bag and curl up into a ball cold. At Goose Bay, I was in the hotel bar when a couple walked up and asked if I was on the 1150 GS outside :huh Turns out they were riding a 650 GS and a 990 KTM and had decided to spend the night in the hotel to warm up and dry tents/bags too.

    Anyway, we spent a few hours talking about the ride to Goose Bay, seeing wolves on the road, avoiding all the mining trucks, etc. In the morning we had breakfast together and then they went off to find gas before heading out on the next long stretch of highway. I didn't see them again so I hope they made the distance without running out of gas.
    #34
  15. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    I need to see if I can find a marble road picture :nod But, there's a rider heading down that way now so I'm going to see if he can stop and take a closer look. The problem I had was, if you stopped, you and/or your bike may have been blown over.
    #35
  16. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    Sleeping in a warm room has its rewards. You can get up in the middle of the night without freezing as well as wake up in the morning and lay around thinking of the last few days and what you've seen. But, at some point you need to start packing. I wasn't sure how far I would ride today. I knew I had 400 km of new gravel and then I needed to get to Port Hope Simpson for fuel.

    The Beast has a 41 liter tank so, if full, I can make over 650 km. The problem is if I fill the tank I've got about 70 lbs of fuel. I'm always trying to decide how much fuel I should carry for a given road. In this case, I put in enough to insure I could get to Port Hope Simpson, but I didn't fill it up.

    The 400 km of new gravel hwy wasn't too bad. A little soft in places and in other sections a road grader has been through, so the road would be real soft. But, for the most part it was like this

    [​IMG]

    About 45 minutes into the ride the clouds started dropping and then it started to drizzle.

    [​IMG]

    It wasn't too much longer and I had finished the first 400 km and was at the intersection of hwy 510.

    [​IMG]

    If you don't have the range, then you can ride to Cartwright for gas. But, that's heading north, and you need to head south to Port Hope Simpson.

    It wasn't long after the intersection that it start raining. It wasn't a downpour, but it was constant rain and before I knew it, I was riding in about 3 inches of mud. I first realized how deep the mud was when I was about 25 km from Port Fort Simpson an applied a little front brake, which almost dropped the Beast. At Port Fort Simpson I seriously though about stopping for the day (it was around 1 pm) but decided to push on to the next town.

    The road, while muddy in places was much better, scenery wise, then the earlier part of the trip

    [​IMG]

    But it continued to rain and I continued to push to the "next town" down the road. About 6 PM I decided I'd stop at Red Bay for the night.

    [​IMG]

    But, at Red Bay the road was paved so I continued to Blanc Sablon and my ferry

    [​IMG]

    In a little over an hour it left for Newfoundland, so I had time to grab a bite to eat and start drying my riding gear before boarding. 650 km of gravel road wasn't too bad for a days ride!
    #36
  17. Goldie05

    Goldie05 Fast George

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    I wanna see more, I'm liking what I see :lurk

    I'm planning on doing a trip to Labrador next year then east and south just like you into Nova Scotia :thumb
    #37
  18. sailer

    sailer trained Cirus Bear

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    that is a great quote
    #38
  19. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    It's a fun trip. I would have liked to spend more time in Newfoundland (Which I'll write about next on on my RR). If you're camping out, be sure to think about what to do in the tent when the black flies arrive :huh
    #39
  20. moto-treks

    moto-treks Back Home

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    The weather had turned from rain to wind as I waited for the ferry to arrive. Watching the caption dock the ferry in high winds was amazing. He made it look like this was an everyday thing – guess it probably is.

    About halfway through the ferry crossing my damp riding gear starting to feel dry. As luck would have it, this is also when it started raining. But, it was not just rain, it was hard rain with strong winds. Oh yeah, I just love this stuff – it reminded me of the hour or two I waited for a ferry in Terra del Fuego, Argentina – same stuff, rain and wind.

    Luckily, there was a hotel just a block or two from the terminal in St Barbe. Pulling up to the hotel, my heart sank as I saw the line of people trying to book a room. I had heard that other hotels are in the area, but the last thing I wanted was to spend the night, in the rain and wind, looking for a hotel room or putting up a tent. I got the last room in the place! I felt a little sorry for the five people standing behind me but they had cars so I didn't feel that bad.

    The rain and wind stopped in the early morning. I decided to have a nice breakfast before heading out to L'Anse aux Meadows – Leif Ericson's home away from home.

    L'Anse aux Meadows
    [​IMG]

    Original Workshop Site
    [​IMG]

    This sight was discovered by Heldg and Anne Ingstad. These two has been exploring the area for years looking for Viking settlements and finally found this one in 1960. The settlement was occupied around 990-1030 AD. Today, the site is a UNESCO World Heritage site.


    Reconstructed Viking Encampment
    [​IMG]

    Turf Wall
    [​IMG]

    Iron Processing
    [​IMG]

    Viking Artifacts
    [​IMG]

    Turf House
    [​IMG]

    Turf House Bedroom
    [​IMG]

    It was early afternoon when I left L'Anse aux Meadows and started riding south. While riding, I kept seeing road signs that said moose are in the area. The park rangers at L'Anse aux Meadows told me this was day two of moose hunting season and that not only should I keep an eye out for moose, but the hunters would be out in force too. If they are anything like the hunters in the US, I should be more worried about them then the moose!

    The last 5 miles or so before I reached Rocky Harbour were the worse. It was getting dark and every mile or so was a sign about how many accidents had occurred this year due to moose or deer. Lucky, I didn't see a single moose or a deer the whole time I was in Newfoundland. It's not that I don't want to see these animals, I just prefer not see them while riding.

    Rocky Harbour
    [​IMG]

    Rocky Harbour is a picturesque little town with a nice hotel by the bay. After changing into people clothes, I made my way to the restaurant for a few beers and some great fish and chips. Tomorrow was going to be an early day as I needed to get to the ferry before noon.

    The ride from Rocky Harbour to Port aux Basque started of as one of the coldest rides I've taking in a long long time. I had 330km to ride before noon so I got one of those as-the-sun-breaks starts. Again, I was keeping an eye out for moose and deer as these guys would be heading home after a night of food as festivities.

    The first hour was the ride was fucking cold. I had my electric vest and heated grips turned all the way up and I still couldn’t keep my fingers from freezing. Even sticking my hands on the Beast's jugs didn't thaw them out! But, it wasn't raining or snowing, and I didn't see any moose or deer, so life is good.

    I arrived at the ferry terminal about 30 minutes early and was told the ferry had been delayed by 3 hours! I smiled at the attendant, paid my ferry fees and parked the Beast in the moto line for the ferry. Then, I stood next to the Beast for about 30 minutes soaking up the heat of the sun – man, it felt nice!

    After a warm breakfast, I changed out of my riding gear in the terminal bathroom. This place even had a shower but I figured taking a shower would be too much indulgence. After changing I was more than content to wait outside, in the sun, for the ferry to arrive.

    <img src="http://www.moto-treks.com/PhotoGallery/albums/north-america/trans-labrador/translab_020.JPG" width="1020" />

    This doesn't look like a ferry in the Pacific Northwest
    [​IMG]
    #40