"Motoman" Rough Break In

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by porkandcorn, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. porkandcorn

    porkandcorn FortesFortunaAdiuvat

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    [​IMG]

    Hey there,

    I'm picking up a new 2012 Triumph Tiger 800xc this week, and in some research, ran across "Motoman" Pat McGivern's Engine Break In Secrets webpage. First of all, this guy seems like he's a superhero from another planet with the world's lamest website possible - funny to search the internet for someone these days and hit all dead ends. He seems to have disappeared. Anyway...

    I'm not all that well versed in this stuff, but there is something about this technique that feels right.

    Any thoughts (or personal experience) out there to share on whether or not this is a good idea?

    My summary as I understood it:

    -break in hard through all gears with heavy acceleration and then deceleration
    -play with the throttle, never steady on it
    -don't even start it the first time unless you intend to break it in
    -make sure bike is warmed up 5-10 minutes on idle before you do this
    -break in with dinosaur oil
    -change oil after the break in (20-30 miles)
    -ride like hell after you do this and laugh at other people in there 600 mile break in period

    Here's the article:

    http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

    And a funny youtube of this technique from India or somewhere:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekjEZp5Ows0

    Motoman:

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. omeoxlv

    omeoxlv Been here awhile

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    edited
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  3. pretbek

    pretbek Long timer

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    From my bike's Owners Manual:
    Shift to 2nd @ 9 mph
    Shift to 3rd @ 15 mph
    Shift to 4th @ 21 mph
    Shift to 5th @ 27 mph
    Shift to 6th @ 34 mph
    :eek1

    Something tells me not everything that they write in the manual is written only by engineers, but some mostly by lawyers covering the company's ass.

    If you do the Motoman break-in wrong, you could ruin your bike then and there, and significantly so.
    If you do the bike manual's break-in (can't do it "wrong", it is so slow and tedious), you probably get a slower engine with somewhat leaky piston rings causing a tiny bit of oil consumption, dirtier oil and more wear on the piston edges.

    The latter is a much less dramatic "failure" and usually won't be chalked up to the prescribed slow-ass break in, but just to "that's how it is".
    #3
  4. Trailrider200

    Trailrider200 Been here awhile

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    Went to the Marysville MD honda motorcycle plant a few yrs ago when they were still building Valkyries and Goldwings there. Took the tour through the assembly line, get to the intial startup/run dyno platform that ALL new bikes go to. Each bike was run through the gears to a top speed of 60 mph. The bikes were not run to redline, but the operator was far from easy on the rpms going through the gears doing his different tests. Valkyrie and GW engines are known for 400+K miles longevity and never burn oil. The motoman is right!
    anybody who is around the building and tunning of new race engines on a dyno will tell u he is right. nobody puts 600 hundred easy miles on a race engine before it goes on the dyno.
    #4
  5. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    Oh no, somebody soon put the lid back on that Pandora┬┤s box... :lol3
    #5
  6. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

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    :rofl This will be better than an oil thread with a little bit of truth and good observations in each post.

    Triumph also has several videos of running each finished bike on the dyno up to high RPMs through all gears.

    A custom "race" engine does not get built nor broken in with the same expectation of longevity vs. a "OEM" offering for the masses, etc., etc.

    The worse things to do is to idle for excessive lengths of time, lug the engine and/or just keep banging off the rev limiter. Riding hilly and twisty back roads is the easiest way to vary speed, RPM, shift gears often and find nice places to stop and cool the engine to allow a few heat cycles to facilitate the engine, transmission and rider to get to know one another as well as bedding the brakes, etc. If you are concerned with oil contamination, it is likely a filter change and topping the oil level that will benefit the most as the oil won't break down in such few miles.

    As omeoxlv posted, following the OEM guidelines should not be dismissed, Just ride her to let her start stretching her legs and then get a service when needed with quality oil and filters that meet spec and don't worry about anything other than finding more time to ride. BTW, our advice is worth what you paid for it and Triumph's is too. YRMV.:deal


    Cheers and Enjoy!
    #6
  7. devo2002

    devo2002 -Devo

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    I'd also follow the manual for break in. An oil change around 50 miles would be the best thing for your bike
    #7
  8. Rob Dirt

    Rob Dirt More or less in line

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    Like already said, Triumph runs each bike on a dyno. Then they dump the oil & put in semi-synthetic. Motoman's method is already screwed up. I changed my oil after riding home & the oil was like new. No metal shavings at all.

    BTW, isn't he referring to a brand new thumper? I haven't read it in a long time.
    #8
  9. kirb

    kirb should be out riding

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    I'll go with the guy who is going to warranty my bike for 2 years, not someone who isn't.
    #9
  10. protondecay123

    protondecay123 Been here awhile

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    I've Motoman'd my last three brand new bikes and never had a problem with the break in or motors, but my bikes have not been Triumph's. Also I usually wait longer than 20 miles to change the oil, more like 50. Have never broke the speed limit. Find some country roads, get out of the city.
    #10
  11. devo2002

    devo2002 -Devo

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    Good to hear from someone who has done it, what bike/year and how many miles have you put on them?
    #11
  12. protondecay123

    protondecay123 Been here awhile

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    2005 Yamaha FJR1300 ~ 50K, 2012 SuperTen ~ 12K, 2012 WR450 ~ 1 hour on the clock.
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  13. omeoxlv

    omeoxlv Been here awhile

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  14. DeejayP999

    DeejayP999 Adventurer

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    I fear that you've misunderstood the Motoman method.

    There's nothing harsh or rough about it - and we're not "Getting away with it now because of superior engineering ability". In fact it's nothing new - I've seen the same method recommended for old Brit bikes, by one of the most renowned Brit Bike engine builders of the day.

    So it's a sound, long established process.

    It's simply a methodical system of loading and unloading the engine in order to ensure proper seating of the piston rings - surely a far better approach than simply following the age-old recipe of certain revs for a certain mileage.

    In fact the only possible downside is that it may be a waste of time with some modern engines - ie those which are already run-in on the bench (doubtless using a similar method) before they even leave the factory.

    So at worst you waste some time, at best you end up with a smoother, more efficient engine.
    #14
  15. protondecay123

    protondecay123 Been here awhile

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    It's actually pretty basic. Run it through the rev range up and down. It's not sustained red line or anything "rough". Sustaining a certain Rpm for extended periods of time is what you don't want to do. Change the oil early as that's when the biggest metal flakes are likely to fall and again at the manufacturers recommended first oil change using dinosaur oil.
    #15
  16. devo2002

    devo2002 -Devo

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    This is all talk until someone who has done this and reports their engine blew up or it went 100k+ miles.

    Unless someone has ridden the same bike brand new, one via moto
    Method, one via service manual, and ridden the same way, there is simply no way to verify which is better
    #16
  17. pretbek

    pretbek Long timer

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    I thought this was pretty convincing:
    Identical engines, "According to manual" on left, "Motoman method" on right.

    [​IMG]


    I am a mechanical engineer and I understand and agree with Motoman's explanation of why he thinks his method works. It makes sense mechanically. You warm up the engine, you load the piston rings significantly under positive and negative pressure, then change the oil to remove possible contaminations.

    If the only reasoning for preferring according to manual is "because the manufacturer said so", that is not much of a scientific argument.
    #17
  18. kirb

    kirb should be out riding

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    So, there is more scientific methods used with Motoman? (see, that shit works both ways)

    How many engineers do MFGs employ- many
    How many engineers does Motoman employ- none
    How many MFGs suggest the 'slow' break in- all
    How many MFGs suggest the motoman style method- none

    Why would every motorcycle MFG suggest the same style of break in, since I can remember- at least into the 70's?
    At some point you have to look at the big picture.
    #18
  19. tcourdin

    tcourdin Resident Spooner

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    I just ride my new bike, and change the oil. Never had a problem. I've heard lots of different opinions in all my years of riding on how to break in an engine, none seem to matter as long as you're not bouncing it off the rev limiter when you leave the showroom.
    #19
  20. bmac

    bmac Been here awhile

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    I do not agree with the statement that all MFG's recommend a "slow" break in. Generally, they suggest varied RPM's with no steady throttle. Many do suggest avoiding prolonged full throttle operation but that is not the same as "take it easy".

    Loading the engine with varying throttle input is generally considered the correct way to break in an engine. Positive and negative pressure help produce a good ring seal against the cylinder wall. Easy, or steady state, throttle is not the way to go.
    #20